Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 66608 times)

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Offline android

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #150 on: January 05, 2013, 02:44:14 PM »
incredible pizza crust recipe, thanks very much for sharing your hard work with us. this dough produced some of the best pizzas I've ever made. my wife and I (mostly I) devoured both pizzas.

made one at 48 hrs in the fridge and the second after 72. both were great, slight edge to the 72. i baked the first one in a perforated 16" pizza pan on a preheated stone on top of a stone at 550 for about 10-12 minutes, which turned out nice, but the second one I made without the stone (same temp and time), and the bottom of the crust was much better developed without using the stone. not saying do it one way or the other, but for my tastes, the pan w/o stone proved the best (IMHO).

thanks again!


Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #151 on: January 07, 2013, 02:41:36 PM »
made one at 48 hrs in the fridge and the second after 72. both were great, slight edge to the 72.

Glad you liked it!    :pizza:

There isn't a ton of difference between 48 and 72, but 72 is definitely the "sweet spot" for that dough.  It behaves better for me.  Much more consistent.

Quote
i baked the first one in a perforated 16" pizza pan on a preheated stone on top of a stone at 550 for about 10-12 minutes, which turned out nice, but the second one I made without the stone (same temp and time), and the bottom of the crust was much better developed without using the stone. not saying do it one way or the other, but for my tastes, the pan w/o stone proved the best (IMHO).

One of the things I've learned is that ovens vary greatly.  At the last place I lived, I had to do 550.  Where I live now, 450 is the only way to get the pies to come out right.  And I use a two-stone set-up: one low and one high.  I start low and finish high (crust cooks faster low, toppings cook faster high).  And sometimes, when the oven seems to be humming along beautifully, I can do the whole bake on the bottom stone.  Go figure.

Overall, I think Chicago thin is pretty forgiving in this regard.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #152 on: February 07, 2013, 07:35:06 PM »
I decided to give this recipe a try considering all of the comments it had gotten.  I gave it a spin last weekend.  I made the dough on Saturday exactly per the recipe.  The dough was refrigerated for ~30 hours.  At prep time, I prepared two 14" pizzas.  I had plenty of my own sauce still available so I used that up.  The cheese is my standard 70:15:15 of skim-milk mozzarella, sharp cheddar and provolone.  The first was my gold standard of Italian sausage and mushrooms.  Next time I will try using the sauce recipe that Garvey posted with the dough recipe.  The second pizza was simply a 1/2 cheese, 1/2 tomato + basil (Midwestern Margherita).  Pizzas were cooked directly on a pizzastone heated at 500 degrees for 1 hour.  I used small dusting of semolina on the peel to help with sliding it onto the stone.  The pics below should give you a pretty good idea how it turned out, which is to say, pretty good. ;D

Comments: I like the recipe.  The dough performed well.  It is a little more hydrated than my standard recipe of 47-48% and it contains A LOT more oil than my typical Midwestern thin crust.  When I first took the dough out of the containers from the refrigerator, it reminded me a fair amount of my BTB-clone Chicago deep-dish dough because of the amount of oil.  I like the final result.  I would say it is as good as some of the other recipes that I use, but no better.  Definitely a keeper, I think I am going to tweak it a little for my own personal taste by reducing the hydration a couple % and cutting the oil to about 1/2 of what the current recipe calls for.  Thanks Garvey! 
-ME :chef:
Let them eat pizza.

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #153 on: February 07, 2013, 07:37:30 PM »
^^that pie looks awesome -- except you ruined it by cutting it into triangles!!!   :P 

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #154 on: February 07, 2013, 07:46:06 PM »
I decided to give this recipe a try considering all of the comments it had gotten.  I gave it a spin last weekend.  I made the dough on Saturday exactly per the recipe.  The dough was refrigerated for ~30 hours.  At prep time, I prepared two 14" pizzas.  I had plenty of my own sauce still available so I used that up.  The cheese is my standard 70:15:15 of skim-milk mozzarella, sharp cheddar and provolone.  The first was my gold standard of Italian sausage and mushrooms.  Next time I will try using the sauce recipe that Garvey posted with the dough recipe.  The second pizza was simply a 1/2 cheese, 1/2 tomato + basil (Midwestern Margherita).  Pizzas were cooked directly on a pizzastone heated at 500 degrees for 1 hour.  I used small dusting of semolina on the peel to help with sliding it onto the stone.  The pics below should give you a pretty good idea how it turned out, which is to say, pretty good. ;D

Comments: I like the recipe.  The dough performed well.  It is a little more hydrated than my standard recipe of 47-48% and it contains A LOT more oil than my typical Midwestern thin crust.  When I first took the dough out of the containers from the refrigerator, it reminded me a fair amount of my BTB-clone Chicago deep-dish dough because of the amount of oil.  I like the final result.  I would say it is as good as some of the other recipes that I use, but no better.  Definitely a keeper, I think I am going to tweak it a little for my own personal taste by reducing the hydration a couple % and cutting the oil to about 1/2 of what the current recipe calls for.  Thanks Garvey! 
-ME :chef:
Yes sir! That crust looks like it has a lot of action going on ME, really nice. What flour did you use on this one...bottom looks like it had the thin egg shell snap to it, no?
Great pizza...but let's tighten up those cutting skills bro.  ;D j/k
Bob
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Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #155 on: February 08, 2013, 12:08:50 PM »
^^that pie looks awesome -- except you ruined it by cutting it into triangles!!!   :P  

Ha!  Beat me to the punch, CDNpielover!   :D

Glad you liked the recipe, Mad Ernie.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #156 on: February 08, 2013, 12:38:44 PM »
Yes, yes, I know - I performed heresy by cutting the Chicago-thin into slices instead of squares.  ::)

I grew up in Illinois and Wisconsin as a lad, and I probably had as many pizzas cut into squares as I did slices.  I did think about the party/tavern cut before I made the slice decision, but for us as a family, the slices work better, so I fudged, but hey, it's the taste that counts.  :D

Chicago Bob: I used King Arthur all-purpose flour.  Most of my photos came out a little dark so I lightened them up before uploading.

Thanks again, Garvey.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #157 on: February 16, 2013, 10:08:06 AM »
Just a side note.

I tried the sauce recipe Garvey posted
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17662.msg171274.html#msg171274

I used it on a Lehmann New York style pizza I made last Sunday, AND I saved the scraps of dough from the Pizza Factory clone dough I made the week before and made a 11" pizza from the scraps.  Both came out well, but I have to say, the sauce was even better than the dough!  It had tomato-sweetness to it, with just enough added flavor from the herbs to kick it up a notch.  This is DEFINITELY a keeper! :chef:

Great job, Garvey, and thanks again!  ;D

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #158 on: February 17, 2013, 07:40:30 PM »
Thanks, Mad Ernie.  I had to eat a LOT of pizza to get that sauce recipe correct. :D

Cheers,
Garvey


Offline spacelooper

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #159 on: March 04, 2013, 08:26:35 AM »
Garvey, great crust recipe! I had much success with last night's Thin Crust in regards to all around taste. Loved the taste of the crust, I used Trader Joe's Mozzarella both fresh and Low Moisture Whole which was a winner too.. the sauce was a thrown together sauce using 6in1 as a base (added with the usual suspects) and it was a prefect base for this pizza. I will be experimenting further with this combination for sure....I didn't take a ton of pics, but did snap a few. As usual I could always get my crust a tad more done... but using a Toaster oven is an art of getting it done vs burning the top....smile...

thanks again for the recipe Garvey.....

« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 08:28:31 AM by spacelooper »

Offline spacelooper

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #160 on: March 04, 2013, 08:30:12 AM »
Not sure why it flipped 2 photos upside down?? I tried it twice and it did it both times....weird.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #161 on: March 04, 2013, 03:19:55 PM »
That's some fine looking pie!  :drool:

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #162 on: March 06, 2013, 11:53:37 AM »
Hey Garvey,

I just wanted to let you know that I made your Pizza Factory thin crust pizza last night, complete with the sauce, and it was totally delicious. I just loved it.  The crust was flavorful, and the sauce!  I usually just use crushed tomatoes for sauce, so I wasn't quite ready for the full-fledged flavor assault that you get with this tomato paste based, herb infused sauce.  It was really great. So thanks for working so hard to make an authentic Chicago style recipe. It worked great!  

P.S. I did slice it "party-style".  

Regards,

TinRoof
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 05:04:51 PM by tinroofrusted »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #163 on: March 06, 2013, 03:53:52 PM »
TinRoof,

That is a great looking pie!  I'm glad you found the recipe to your liking.  Chicago thin is a fairly sauce-heavy style, and even within the type, I go very heavy on the sauce.

I see you've got a nice two-stone setup, too.  A man after my own heart!  It's really the only way to go in the home pizza factory, er, kitchen.   :D

BTW, if you're not sausage averse, try making the sausage sometime and put that on there.  In Chicago, sausage is, by far, the most popular topping.  Pepperoni may be king everywhere else, but not in the Chicagoland area.

Cheers,
Garvey
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 03:55:56 PM by Garvey »

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #164 on: March 06, 2013, 05:03:21 PM »
I definitely want to try your sausage recipe.  Maybe next time I make it. I prefer fresh sausage over pepperoni. (I put a bit of salami on the pizza, which was very tasty; just what I had on hand). 

Here are a couple of questions for you:

1. Do you ever laminate the dough, i.e., fold it over a few times before rolling it out?  Would that be a good way to go on this dough? 
2. Would you bake with or without convection? I didn't use convection because I was worried about the top getting done too soon. But I could have gone with 450 and convection instead of 475 conventional.  The bake time was just about 9 minutes so it was about right without convection I guess. 

I have some friends visiting in a couple of weeks and I think I will try this recipe out on them. 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #165 on: March 07, 2013, 08:10:34 AM »
TinRoof:

1. No, I never have laminated the dough.  If that's your thing, I don't see how it could hurt and I'd be interested to hear how it went, but this style doesn't really call for that.
2. I have never used a convection oven, but I think that those on this forum say to keep it off.  My best advice is "know thine oven."  If you're normally a convection guy, go with that.  If not, don't.  For me and my oven, I use a two-stone setup and shuttle the pizza from bottom to top as needed.  I start low and finish high, but YMMV.  Every oven is different.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #166 on: May 20, 2013, 02:19:09 PM »
Given how many times I've made this recipe and how long it's been my only thin crust recipe I use (outside of the few experiments inspired by this forum), it sounds crazy to admit that I even tinkered with it at all.  But I think I have stumbled upon an innovation that improves upon this already great recipe:
NO KNEAD.

Here's the back story.  Every winter, the old neighborhood gang gets together for a guys weekend at a cabin in the woods.  Pizza Factory is the star of the show.  We all grew up eating it, and the pizzas we make that weekend are always the best.  Well, several months back, I was making 20-something dough balls for the long weekend, which is a taxing feat without a commercial sized mixer.  My little consumer grade KitchenAid would have to do, and it was going to be many batches at full capacity.  I also have a job and family and don't really have an extra day in the middle of the week to just sit around and make dough.  So I thought to myself, "Heck, I'll just not knead it at all and bang out these batches as quickly as possible."  I made five or six batches of four dough balls (300g each) per batch.  I bulk fermented each batch overnight in a ziploc bag and then balled and bagged up all 20-something. 

I really wasn't sure how they'd turn out.  I figured it would all be OK, and the good company and libations would smooth out any minor deficiencies.  Boy, was I wrong.  It was not OK--it was awesome! 

After the requisite 3-day cold ferment, the dough was workable as usual, but it baked up crispier and more wonderful than ever before.  I was hesitant to share these results here on the forum without further testing.  Yeah, 20+ pizzas might be too many for a fluke, but they were all made at the same time.  Since then, I have made it a couple more times, to great results.  I think this will be my new go-to method.  Would love to hear how it works for you.

NO KNEAD PIZZA FACTORY DOUGH

For each 14" pie, you'll need a 300 g dough ball.  Here is the recipe for two (because who in their right mind would make only one pizza? ;-))

AP Flour (100%):
Cool Water (50%):
IDY (.5%):
Salt (1%):
Oil (8%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (160.5%):
Single Ball:
373.83 g  |  13.19 oz | 0.82 lbs
186.92 g  |  6.59 oz | 0.41 lbs
1.87 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
3.74 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.67 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
29.91 g | 1.05 oz | 0.07 lbs | 6.65 tsp | 2.22 tbsp
3.74 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.94 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
600 g | 21.16 oz | 1.32 lbs | TF = .06875
300 g | 10.58 oz | 0.66 lbs | TF = .06875

NOTE: As a no-knead dough, it requires a long, cold ferment. Make dough 72 hrs ahead (absolute minimum is 48 hrs.; still great after 96 hrs), kept in fridge until a couple hrs before baking.   Punch down if needed during the first 12 hrs.  I like to separate out the dough balls after the first 12 hrs. of rising as one mass.

MIXING: When making the dough, dump all the dry ingredients into the mixer bowl, stir to combine, and then add the liquids.  Be sure to use cool water (60o-ish?). Mix it just until the dough comes together and is uniform throughout.  It's done.  That is, don't knead it.  Cover it and stick it in the fridge for 72 hrs, when it's pizza time.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013, 02:23:40 PM by Garvey »


Offline pythonic

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #167 on: May 21, 2013, 07:04:01 AM »
Given how many times I've made this recipe and how long it's been my only thin crust recipe I use (outside of the few experiments inspired by this forum), it sounds crazy to admit that I even tinkered with it at all.  But I think I have stumbled upon an innovation that improves upon this already great recipe:
NO KNEAD.

Here's the back story.  Every winter, the old neighborhood gang gets together for a guys weekend at a cabin in the woods.  Pizza Factory is the star of the show.  We all grew up eating it, and the pizzas we make that weekend are always the best.  Well, several months back, I was making 20-something dough balls for the long weekend, which is a taxing feat without a commercial sized mixer.  My little consumer grade KitchenAid would have to do, and it was going to be many batches at full capacity.  I also have a job and family and don't really have an extra day in the middle of the week to just sit around and make dough.  So I thought to myself, "Heck, I'll just not knead it at all and bang out these batches as quickly as possible."  I made five or six batches of four dough balls (300g each) per batch.  I bulk fermented each batch overnight in a ziploc bag and then balled and bagged up all 20-something. 

I really wasn't sure how they'd turn out.  I figured it would all be OK, and the good company and libations would smooth out any minor deficiencies.  Boy, was I wrong.  It was not OK--it was awesome! 

After the requisite 3-day cold ferment, the dough was workable as usual, but it baked up crispier and more wonderful than ever before.  I was hesitant to share these results here on the forum without further testing.  Yeah, 20+ pizzas might be too many for a fluke, but they were all made at the same time.  Since then, I have made it a couple more times, to great results.  I think this will be my new go-to method.  Would love to hear how it works for you.

NO KNEAD PIZZA FACTORY DOUGH

For each 14" pie, you'll need a 300 g dough ball.  Here is the recipe for two (because who in their right mind would make only one pizza? ;-))

AP Flour (100%):
Cool Water (50%):
IDY (.5%):
Salt (1%):
Oil (8%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (160.5%):
Single Ball:
373.83 g  |  13.19 oz | 0.82 lbs
186.92 g  |  6.59 oz | 0.41 lbs
1.87 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
3.74 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.67 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
29.91 g | 1.05 oz | 0.07 lbs | 6.65 tsp | 2.22 tbsp
3.74 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.94 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
600 g | 21.16 oz | 1.32 lbs | TF = .06875
300 g | 10.58 oz | 0.66 lbs | TF = .06875

NOTE: As a no-knead dough, it requires a long, cold ferment. Make dough 72 hrs ahead (absolute minimum is 48 hrs.; still great after 96 hrs), kept in fridge until a couple hrs before baking.   Punch down if needed during the first 12 hrs.  I like to separate out the dough balls after the first 12 hrs. of rising as one mass.

MIXING: When making the dough, dump all the dry ingredients into the mixer bowl, stir to combine, and then add the liquids.  Be sure to use cool water (60o-ish?). Mix it just until the dough comes together and is uniform throughout.  It's done.  That is, don't knead it.  Cover it and stick it in the fridge for 72 hrs, when it's pizza time.

Pics or it didnt happen :)

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #168 on: May 21, 2013, 11:50:19 AM »
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #169 on: May 21, 2013, 04:04:28 PM »
I just put some dough for your Pizza Factory dough (no knead version) in the 'fridge. Iím looking forward to Friday.  :drool:

Offline sotaboy

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #170 on: May 21, 2013, 04:42:06 PM »
Let's stop this " pics or it didn't happen" BS. All Garvey did was post a different way to make the dough to achieve the same result of his original formula. And I thank him for the option.
Many esteemed posters here modify recipes, report their findings, without posting pics. You don't need 17 pictures of the same pizza to describe your findings.

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #171 on: May 21, 2013, 04:47:29 PM »
Garvey's formula is the best midwest-style thin crust on this site.  He can therefore say whatever he wants about it, and doesn't have to post photos if he doesn't want to.  (I think most people grow tired of the hoop-jumping required to post photos here.)  Others can say whatever they want about this, but until they post anything better, their comments really don't make any difference at all!   >:D >:D :chef:

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #172 on: May 21, 2013, 04:52:57 PM »
Just in case there are other people as clueless as I, it's now a lot easier to post pix. I'm sorry I didn't know this earlier.

The following is from Steve:

The way that you upload images to the forum has CHANGED.

You no longer need to do any image manipulation in order to upload images. No resizing. No resampling. Just upload. The forum will automatically resize huge images to 1024 pixels wide and resample them to 75% image quality compressed JPGs. Thumbnails still display at 640 pixels wide.

You should be able to upload images directly from your iPhone/iPad too.

Offline vcb

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #173 on: May 21, 2013, 05:24:52 PM »
I've come up with a Chicago thin crust dough formulation that I'm pretty happy with.
I think it started as a variation of Garvey's generic Chicago thin crust dough recipe.

I use it for thin crust, hand stretched pizzas, and calzones, with great results.
http://www.realdeepdish.com/CHICAGO-THIN-CRUST-DOUGH.pdf

For those concerned about making the pizza peel/stone process less of a hassle,
I highly recommend picking up a pizza screen (or two) to bake your pizzas on.
When you use a screen, you won't need cornmeal or semolina to dust the peel,
so that stuff won't smoke up your oven when it falls off the stone.

I preheat my oven for an hour to about 500 degrees with a baking stone on the lower or middle rack.
I put a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil across the top rack (This is how I try to simulate a pizza oven at home).

Roll or stretch your dough out and then gently press the edges onto the pizza screen to hold the dough in place (or crimp your edges like Barnaby's in Northbrook does).
add sauce, cheese, toppings, then place the pizza screen directly on the preheated stone.

Lower your oven to 460-475 (or not - get to know your oven) and bake for about 15-20 minutes.
For the last five minutes, you could remove the the pizza from the pizza screen and bake directly on the stone to get a crispier crust.

FWIW: When I post 'pics or it didn't happen', I am teasing, and I know most of you in here are doing the same ;D.
Generally, I think it's good to encourage others in this forum to try to take more photos when they can.  :chef:

I don't always post my pizza photos, (but when I do, I prefer Dos Equis)
err... I mean: but for those who are interested, you can see my pizza photo archive on Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/edheller/sets/72157628543774967/
It's mainly unprocessed raw photos, as I use Flickr as a backup service & to make photos available for sale.
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http://virtualcheeseblogger.com/

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #174 on: May 21, 2013, 06:37:00 PM »
 :-D @ "pics it or didn't happen."

And thanks for the kind words, everybody.  I think sotaboy really nailed it when he said that it is "a different way to make the dough to achieve the same result of [the] original formula."  It is a nice time saver to not knead, and given the 72-hr ferment, probably unnecessary anyway.  But I actually think the results are better.  Not sure why that is, so I'm interested to see what redox says on Friday.

Cheers,
Garvey