Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 34194 times)

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Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #200 on: May 26, 2013, 02:47:15 PM »
The cutter pan version looks amazing.  Was the pan lubed at all?  I need to rethink my aversion to cutter pans.  That upskirt shot looks like golden goodness.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 02:49:26 PM by Garvey »


Offline pythonic

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #201 on: May 26, 2013, 03:23:19 PM »
Jay,

Looks like Rosatis!  Was this the no knead version?  I'm gonna have to revisit this formulation me thinks.

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #202 on: May 26, 2013, 03:50:25 PM »
The cutter pan version looks amazing.  Was the pan lubed at all?  I need to rethink my aversion to cutter pans.  That upskirt shot looks like golden goodness.

I got my cutter pan here http://lloydpans.com/standard-pans/pizza-tools/pizza-pans-and-trays/cutter-pans and they say all that is needed is an initial wash before the first use. I added a dash of canola oil and then wiped it out with a paper towel leaving only a slight sheen behind. Maybe it's not really not necessary but I feel that it adds a bit of browning w/o the frying effect of using more oil. Their pans aren't cheap but they're very high quality. It's like something Oddjob would heave at James Bond.  :)
p.s. They were the Anodized PSTK pans.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2013, 03:57:35 PM by redox »

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #203 on: May 26, 2013, 03:55:36 PM »
Jay,

Looks like Rosatis!  Was this the no knead version?  I'm gonna have to revisit this formulation me thinks.

Nate
Yep, it was the no knead version. I've done no knead breads in my Lodge Dutch oven and those worked so well that I wanted to try this. This made the best pizzas I've yet had from this site. This hardest part is waiting 3 days before the dough is ready. The second dough ball I baked on the 4th day was just as good.

Offline Condolini

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #204 on: May 28, 2013, 08:42:19 AM »
Made the dough on Saturday, it's cool enough to have the oven on to heat the stone. Fingers crossed guys and girls, I'm goin' in! Will let you know the results.

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #205 on: May 28, 2013, 10:20:07 AM »
I read a tip from the Dough Doctor somewhere else on the forum and bought a 2-inch diameter wooden dowel that I cut to 18-inches in length and then sealed with butcher block conditioner. If you don't happen to have a table top sheeter then the dowel works just fine to get the dough rolled really thin.  :)
Good luck with your pie!

Offline pythonic

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #206 on: May 28, 2013, 10:25:41 AM »
I read a tip from the Dough Doctor somewhere else on the forum and bought a 2-inch diameter wooden dowel that I cut to 18-inches in length and then sealed with butcher block conditioner. If you don't happen to have a table top sheeter then the dowel works just fine to get the dough rolled really thin.  :)
Good luck with your pie!

I'm trying to picture what this looks like.  Are there two dowel rods together?  Is there a crank?

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #207 on: May 28, 2013, 10:28:44 AM »
I'm trying to picture what this looks like.  Are there two dowel rods together?  Is there a crank?

Nate
No, it's just a rolling pin with no handles. Just press and roll. Easy peasy.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #208 on: May 28, 2013, 11:42:39 AM »
No, it's just a rolling pin with no handles. Just press and roll. Easy peasy.
C'mon man...it's easy peazzy dude!  Sheesh!!  ::)
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Offline pythonic

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #209 on: May 28, 2013, 01:12:09 PM »
No, it's just a rolling pin with no handles. Just press and roll. Easy peasy.

Like a French rolling pin?
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.


Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #210 on: May 28, 2013, 01:16:42 PM »
C'mon man...it's easy peazzy dude!  Sheesh!!  ::)

Yeah and this guy's got it wrong, too.  ;D


Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #211 on: May 28, 2013, 01:22:52 PM »
Like a French rolling pin?
Yeah, but those are thicker in the middle and tapering towards the ends. If you're more skillful than I am you could probably use one but the constant diameter dowel-type rolling pin is easier for those of us less skillful. I don't think I could roll a perfectly even and consistently thin pie with a French rolling pin. I have a French rolling pin and the dowel is much easier to use for this purpose.

Offline vcb

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #212 on: May 28, 2013, 01:33:20 PM »
You can get one of those straight rolling pins (and spacers) on amazon (and elsewhere) for $20 bucks or less, no labor involved on your part.  :chef:

Just search for 'rolling pin'  ::)

There's even one made in (gasp) the USA!
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000IYYG26/?tag=pizzamaking-20

[seriously, I'm amazed that anything is made in the USA anymore]  ;D

« Last Edit: March 07, 2014, 08:56:01 PM by Steve »
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Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #213 on: May 28, 2013, 01:59:09 PM »
You can get one of those straight rolling pins (and spacers) on amazon (and elsewhere) for $20 bucks or less, no labor involved on your part.  :chef:

Just search for 'rolling pin'  ::)

There's even one made in (gasp) the USA!
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000IYYG26/?tag=pizzamaking-20

[seriously, I'm amazed that anything is made in the USA anymore]  ;D

If I'd seen that I'd probably have ordered it just because I'm lazy but I got a 4' dowel (2-in. dia.) for 6 or 7 bucks at Menards and it was easy to cut. And I've got enough left for an extra.
Yeah, I'm always surprised when something is made in the USA, too. But this doesn't even have any moving parts! We're like our own third world country.  ???
« Last Edit: March 07, 2014, 08:55:36 PM by Steve »

Offline CDN

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #214 on: July 10, 2013, 10:14:15 AM »
Good Day All,

I have tried to absord as much a possible from this forum. Lots of very smart folks here for sure.

My Wife and I both like a thin pizza so I decided to try this as my first attempt at dough.

My first issue is that my digital scale does not show two decimal places, so I did the best I could.

The recipe I followed was from the start of the thread.
Below you can see the flour and yeast used. I am trying to find proper pizza Flour at this time.
The first dough is after kneading dough by hand, I don't have a mixer
And the second dough ball is the next morning.
My mistake was adding oil to the ball why, just what I seen.

Q; I still need to punch down knead and make two balls. Can I remove and wipe the excess oil off?

Thanks for viewing,
CDN

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #215 on: July 10, 2013, 10:50:14 AM »
Wow that does look like quite a lot of oil!  :chef:  I don't think you'll be able to remove much by wiping the dough ball, but you can try tilting the bowl to dump the excess out.  I would just go ahead and cook their anyhow, after all doughs of this style can contain relatively high amounts of oil.    :chef:

Offline CDN

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #216 on: July 10, 2013, 10:58:15 AM »
Thanks I will start draining now.

Not sure why the pics went sideways.

Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #217 on: July 14, 2013, 02:28:11 PM »
CDN
I hope your pizza turned out ok. Garvey's is my favorite so far. It is outstanding! It closely duplicates my favorite local joint that is, unfortunately going downhill, so it's great having this one to replace it.

Offline eric88h

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #218 on: July 14, 2013, 11:35:40 PM »
Whats going on everyone?

Completely new to pizza making and have a few questions.


I've never really cooked much ever..but am a huge pizza lover. I tried making my own pizza a few weeks ago, using crap ingredients and some random brand pizza sauce. As predicted, the pizza sucked, but the making it Is what I really enjoyed. So I did some googling and Stumbled upon this website and have ever sincee been thrilled to start making a killer pizza I'll actually enjoy.

New to pizza making I decided to keep it simple. I used loo's emergency dough and it came out good enough.

The rest of the pizza is where my questions are.

I decided to try Garvey's sauce hoping it would be similar to the pizza joints I love most. But unfortunately..it wasn't. I'm not sure if I cooked it wrong, but it was more of a spicy sauce. Is it supposed to be somewhat spicy? The sauces I like most, and are used of..are the more Sweet flavored sauces. One of my favorite pizza joints which have a few over Chicago is "Pizza Nova". Theres a ton of other places that make similar pizza, but I really doubt you'll know of those unless you lived in my neighborhoods. (Little Village/Cicero/Berwyn area)

Since this sauce is raved about.. I'm assuming I must have done something wrong.

Also, the cheese was bland. I used "Frigo" whole milk mozzarella (from a block). I've been reading people add Provolone and cheddar to give a better taste to it, so I'll have to try that next time.

On my first pizza I used a store made italian Sausage...which completely threw the pizza taste off and wasn't good at all. I tried finding some fennel sausage, but was unable to so just bought some pepperoni instead. Which takes me to my next question. What kinds of pepperoni's are you guys using? I've tried store brands, hormel, and 1 other that I can't remember the name of..and none of them seem to match the flavor of pepperoni's restaurants are serving out. They taste like pepperoni's I'd find in a lunchable or something.

Well, any help you guys can give would be appreciated. I really enjoyed making the pizzas..but can't settle with these "just ok" flavors.

Thanks in advance!

-Eric

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #219 on: July 15, 2013, 09:22:06 AM »
Eric, you made a sauce containing 12 different spices and asked if it's "supposed to be somewhat spicy"....the answer is yes.
Mozz is a bland cheese...most folks add provo or ched or any type of flavorful cheese you may like.
The best store bought fennel sausage I know of is Premio "mild".
Good pepperoni can be found by using the "search" function.  ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


 

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