Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 62721 times)

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Offline rkrider99

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #250 on: September 08, 2013, 04:27:18 PM »
Delicious, they were!

The pictures turned out a little darker than they actually were. I made this dough Thursday evening for Saturday night. Next week, I'll make the dough on Wednesday,  for Saturday night.


Offline redox

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #251 on: September 21, 2013, 03:51:03 PM »
Ah, just put some Garvey's No-Knead Pizza Factory Clone in the fridge for 3 days hence. I didn't really want to say "hence" but it just popped out. I've tried "hence-sitting" but it just doesn't work.  :)

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #252 on: October 22, 2013, 11:58:19 PM »
So Garvey, I took the liberty of tweaking your recipe just a titch and also made some conversions to make it in a bulk batch so one doesn't have to do all the measuring every time you need it. I figure about 1-2 tbsp per 12 oz can of paste with the water. I bought the spices as leaf like you suggested and then ground them down in a blender to approximate the size granules of the garlic, onion, salt, pepper etc. so then finer grained stuff wouldn't fall to the bottom and would stay more homogenized you could say.  Turned out real nice, thank you for a great recipe!!

jon

                               Garvey's PIZZA FACTORY RECIPE

12 oz. can Contadina tomato paste     
3/4 c. water

1/2 tsp. salt                                        1/2cup
1/2 tsp. black pepper                            1/2 cup
1/4 tsp. onion powder                           1/4 cup
1/8 tsp. garlic powder                           1/8 cup
1 tsp. thyme                                        1 cup
1/2 tsp. basil                                       1/2 cup   
3/4 tsp. oregano                                   3/4 cup
1 1/4 tsp. marjoram                              1 1/4 cup
1 tsp. fennel seed                                 1 cup
1/2 tsp. McCormick Italian Seasoning       1/2 cup
3 dashes paprika                                   1/8 cup
1/2 tsp. sugar                                       1/2 cup
1/4 tsp Aleppo Flakes                            1/4 cup (I used a bit more, pretty much replaces the paprika if one wanted to omit, I used both)

Anything I left out or suggestions fire away!
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #253 on: October 23, 2013, 10:12:55 PM »
Nice going.  Thanks, Jon.  That's actually how original Pizza Factory did it, more or less.  One scoop of the pre-mix blend per giant can of paste.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Qarl

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #254 on: October 25, 2013, 12:24:22 AM »
I've never used a cutter pan.  Do you wipe it lightly with oil and place directly on the rack?

Or do you place it on a stone like you would do for Sicilian or deep dish?

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #255 on: October 29, 2013, 11:16:15 AM »
Qarl:

I've done both.  Putting it on the stone will give you a little more heat generated from the bottom, but not like if you were to put the pizza directly on the stone.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #256 on: October 29, 2013, 05:24:55 PM »
I've never used a cutter pan. 

I've experimented a few times with cutter pans but simply did not have any luck getting the crust to come out right, FWIW...

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #257 on: October 30, 2013, 10:45:29 AM »
I've experimented a few times with cutter pans but simply did not have any luck getting the crust to come out right, FWIW...

I second that comment.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline BTB

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #258 on: October 30, 2013, 11:03:31 AM »
Just another man's opinion . . .  I've done hot stones, screens, and cutter pans and prefer cutter pans first, screens second, and stones last.  But one must test all out for themselves.   Peoples' use of cutter pans, however, is erratic as they do not use them in a consistent or proper manner.  Hard to describe.  But I love to use cutter pans for thin crust Chicago style.  --BTB


Offline rkrider99

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #259 on: November 01, 2013, 04:53:34 PM »
I have a question that I have not gotten or actually too many search responses on.

Can I make a Chicago thin crust using Caputo flour?

Balistreris in Milwaukee made this super thin crust pizza, very airy,  almost like a saltine cracker, but without the layers.  I'm really trying to duplicate it and am getting close, but I'm not there yet. My next experiment would be try Caputo.

I'm hoping the high temp tolerance of Caputo will allow me to get that crispness on the Blackstone without making it too charred.

Tom

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #260 on: November 01, 2013, 07:50:10 PM »
I have a question that I have not gotten or actually too many search responses on.

Can I make a Chicago thin crust using Caputo flour?

Balistreris in Milwaukee made this super thin crust pizza, very airy,  almost like a saltine cracker, but without the layers.  I'm really trying to duplicate it and am getting close, but I'm not there yet. My next experiment would be try Caputo.

I'm hoping the high temp tolerance of Caputo will allow me to get that crispness on the Blackstone without making it too charred.

Tom

MAN Balisteri's looks AWESOME  :drool:
http://balistreris.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Balistreris-MilwaukeesBestPizza.jpg
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 09:39:41 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline rkrider99

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #261 on: November 01, 2013, 09:50:48 PM »
It's #1 in pizza for me, and what I strive to imitate.
The crust is paper thin, and so tender, but crisp.
I haven't had it now in over 10 years. I may need to fly up there just to taste it again.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #262 on: November 02, 2013, 03:02:30 PM »
You might get some better help looking/posting in the cracker style sections of the greater forum.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #263 on: November 03, 2013, 08:44:15 PM »
I have a question that I have not gotten or actually too many search responses on.

Can I make a Chicago thin crust using Caputo flour?

Balistreris in Milwaukee made this super thin crust pizza, very airy,  almost like a saltine cracker, but without the layers.  I'm really trying to duplicate it and am getting close, but I'm not there yet. My next experiment would be try Caputo.

I'm hoping the high temp tolerance of Caputo will allow me to get that crispness on the Blackstone without making it too charred.

Tom

I tried it once on the BS using SI 00 flour with 'just ok' results. There are better ones that I've done on the BS using HG flour, just do a par-bake and run around 600-700 temps

jon
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

Offline rkrider99

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #264 on: November 04, 2013, 05:47:36 AM »
I tried it Saturday evening. It turned out OK. Nothing special. I think I launched it at about 750-775 on the bottom stone, and while it was paper thin, it charred a little too much before the middle cooked.
I may try it again, and then again, maybe not.

Tom

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #265 on: November 04, 2013, 09:30:30 AM »
I tried it Saturday evening. It turned out OK. Nothing special. I think I launched it at about 750-775 on the bottom stone, and while it was paper thin, it charred a little too much before the middle cooked.
I may try it again, and then again, maybe not.

Tom

Hey Tom, I'm not sure what formulation or style you're referring to, but if it's a Chicago thin then those temps are way, way hotter than is typically used.  Chicago thins are generally baked between 425 and 500.

Offline rkrider99

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #266 on: November 04, 2013, 05:58:27 PM »
I agree with you. I let the blackstone get ahead of me. I lit it up, and went inside to make the pizza. I came back out with the pizza, hit the stone with the IR gun, and immediately figured it was too hot, but then again, this is Caputo, which is somewhat tolerant of the heat.

One of these days, when I'm fooling around again and experimenting, I'll try it at the lower temp, if I can get it low enough on the BS..

Tom


Offline TomN

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #267 on: November 04, 2013, 07:51:47 PM »
I just wanted to thank you again for sharing your sauce recipe on page 1. Many people do not share their sauce recipes. Thanks again.

TomN

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #268 on: November 04, 2013, 08:31:22 PM »
I just wanted to thank you again for sharing your sauce recipe on page 1. Many people do not share their sauce recipes. Thanks again.

You're welcome! 

That was (/is?) the biggest shortcoming of these forums.  First and foremost, this seems to be a dough/crust community.  I actually didn't join and only occasionally browsed around for years and years because of this.  Then I thought the best way to change things was to jump in myself.  So I always include my sauce recipes (e.g., my Aurelio's recipe is somewhere on here, too).  But my best guess is that folks here undervalue sauce or something.  I dunno.  I still can't figure that aspect out about this forum.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #269 on: November 04, 2013, 10:53:22 PM »
In my case, the sauce recipe would be: "One can of good quality crushed tomatoes". There just isn't that much to say about most of my sauces.  That said, I am all in favor of more "sauce community". And I really love the Garvey pizza sauce too (as documented above). 

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #270 on: November 04, 2013, 11:18:30 PM »
And I'll add this, if anyone hasn't tried the seasoning blend, it is GREAT! I took a few liberties to adjust to my own taste and converted it into a bulk recipe and it has become my "GO TO" Italian blend. I posted in the "Off Topic Foods" under 'Chorizo Spaghetti Sauce' about using it in that. It really is a great seasoning blend to be used on WAY more than pizza. VERY versatile spice blend. The leftover sauce will be a lasagne tomorrow :drool: Thanks again to Garvey!!!

jon
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #271 on: November 05, 2013, 08:25:59 AM »
That was (/is?) the biggest shortcoming of these forums.  First and foremost, this seems to be a dough/crust community.  I actually didn't join and only occasionally browsed around for years and years because of this.  Then I thought the best way to change things was to jump in myself.  So I always include my sauce recipes (e.g., my Aurelio's recipe is somewhere on here, too).  But my best guess is that folks here undervalue sauce or something.  I dunno.  I still can't figure that aspect out about this forum.
Garvey,

As one who has observed these sorts of matters over the years, there is a fair amount of truth to what you say about pizza sauces. They have pretty much always been stepchildren to the dough. In this vein, I once started a monthly challenge in which I asked members to post their favorite red pizza sauces. As you can see from http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9744.0.html, the silence was deafening.

In my experience, tomatoes and sauces have always been intensely personal and highly opinion based. And people can be very vocal in expressing their love or hatred for a particular sauce or tomato. That is why I rarely comment on them. My opinion would be no better or worse than any other. More than once, I have seen members ask other members for their favorite or best pizza sauces only to pan them when they were submitted and tried. Similarly, I don't think that there is any canned tomato product that a member has loved on this forum that someone else couldn't stand. And heaven help you if you cook your pizza sauce :-D.

The above said, there are some pizza sauces that do attract others and have become favorites. Yours is one of them. And November's unique pizza sauce, as described at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3735.msg32136.html#msg32136, is another. People also like clones of pizza sauces, perhaps more so than original pizza sauces. A good example of this is the Papa John's clone pizza sauces at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6633.0.html. Elsewhere on the forum, clones of the Pizza Hut and Domino's sauces have also been posted, and others have been attempted.

I'm glad you decided to stick around and to post your favorite Chicago thin style, sauce, sausage and seasonings.

Peter

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #272 on: November 05, 2013, 11:24:03 AM »
Peter:

Thanks for the reply.  That thread is shocking, indeed.  Only two recipes contributed?  Crazy.

I agree that the clone recipes tend to gain more traction, since an actual benchmark exists in the original recipe.  That is typically where we see more group contributions, but even that is not always the case.  My sauce recipe is indeed a clone...of a place that no longer exists.  So I don't feel bad when someone doesn't like it.  I'm only paying tribute to the original.

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline IHK

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #273 on: November 05, 2013, 09:26:21 PM »
Hey everyone,

Special thanks to Garvey and the rest of you who shared so much information. I made two of these pizzas and they turned out great! I took a couple pictures but they are nothing compared to some of the ones already posted.

Let me rephrase what I wrote above, the pizzas were awesome!!! I will definitely be making this again very soon and take some better pictures.

Thanks again!

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #274 on: November 05, 2013, 09:52:34 PM »
Hey everyone,

Special thanks to Garvey and the rest of you who shared so much information. I made two of these pizzas and they turned out great! I took a couple pictures but they are nothing compared to some of the ones already posted.

Let me rephrase what I wrote above, the pizzas were awesome!!! I will definitely be making this again very soon and take some better pictures.

Thanks again!

Post them pics anyway, I'm sure they look fine!

jon
“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain


 

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