Author Topic: 14 day cold fermentation?  (Read 2149 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
14 day cold fermentation?
« on: February 15, 2012, 10:41:27 AM »
Has anyone else seen this?

THE MASTER RECIPE
Recipe courtesy Artisan Pizza and Flatbread in 5 Minutes a Day
Makes 8 Pizzas

    Ingredients:
    3 1/2 cups lukewarm water (100°F or below)
    1 tablespoon granulated yeast
    1- 11/2 tablespoon Kosher salt
    7 1/2 cups (scoop and sweep) unbleached all- purpose flour
    8 tomatoes
    2 2/3 cup tomato topping of your choice
    24 oz. fresh mozzarella, cut into 1/2- inch chunks
    48 fresh basil leaves, whole, thinly slivered or torn
    Olive oil for drizzling over the pizza before baking
    Flour, cornmeal, or parchment paper for the pizza peel

1. Warm the water slightly: It should feel just a little warmer than body temperature, about 100°F. Using warm water will allow the dough to rise to the right point for storage in about 2 hours. You can use cold tap water and get a great fi nal result; but this initial rising will take longer.

2. Add yeast and salt to the water in a 5- quart bowl or, preferably, in a lidded (not airtight) plastic food container or foodgrade bucket. Don't worry about getting them to dissolve completely.

3. Measure the flour with the "scoop-and-sweep" method or weigh the ingredients. Then mix in the flour- kneading is unnecessary: Add all of the flour and mix with a wooden spoon, Danish dough whisk, 14- cup food processor (with dough attachment), or a heavy-duty stand mixer (with paddle). You might need touse wet hands to get the last bit of fl our to incorporate if you're not using a machine. Don't knead, it isn't necessary. You're fi nished when everything is uniformly moistened, without dry patches. This step is done in a matter of minutes, and yields dough that is loose enough to conform to the shape of its container.

4. Allow to rise: Cover with a lid (not airtight), leave it open a crack for the first 48 hours to prevent a buildup of gases; after that you can usually seal it. Allow the dough to rise at room temperature until it begins to flatten on the top, approximately 2 hours, depending on the room's temperature and the initial water temperature. Do not punch down the dough! With our method, you're trying to retain as much gas in the dough as possible, and punching it down knocks out gas and will make your pizza and flatbreads dense.

5. After rising, refrigerate and use over the next 14 days; the dough will develop sourdough characteristics over that time. Fully refrigerated wet dough is less sticky and is easier to work with than dough at room temperature. So, the first time you try our method, it's best to refrigerate the dough overnight (or at least 3 hours) before use. Once it's refrigerated, the dough will collapse, and it will never rise again in the bucket- that's normal for our dough.

On Pizza Day

6. Prepare and mea sure toppings in advance: This will help you top thepizza quickly so you can get it into the oven before it sticks to the pizza peel.

7. Thirty minutes before you're ready to bake, preheat a baking stone at your oven's highest temperature, with a baking stone placed in the bottom third of the oven.

8. Shape a ball in 20 to 30 seconds. First, prepare a pizza peel with fl our, cornmeal, or parchment paper to prevent your pizza from sticking to it when you slide it into the oven. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with fl our. Pull up and cut off a 1/2- pound (orange-size) piece of dough, using a serrated knife or kitchen shears. Hold the piece of dough in your hands and add a little more fl our as needed so it won't stick to your hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all four sides, rotating the dough a quarter-turn as you go to form a ball. Most of the dusting flour will fall off; it's not intended to be incorporated into the dough. The bottom of the ball may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will fl atten out and adhere when you roll it into a pizza or flatbread. The entire process should take no longer than 20 to 30 seconds.

9. Roll out and stretch the pizza crust: Flatten the dough with your hands and a rolling pin on a work surface or directly onto the pizza peel to produce a 1/8- inch- thick round, dusting with flour to keep the dough from adhering to your work surface. A little sticking to the surface can be helpful in overcoming the dough's resistance to stretch. Use a dough scraper to unstick the dough as needed, and transfer it to the prepared pizza peel if you haven't already stretched the dough directly on one. When you're finished, the dough round will be about 12 inches across, and should have enough flour under it to move easily when you shake the peel. As you add toppings, continue to test for sticking by gently shaking the peel. The pizza should move freely. If it doesn't, use the dough scraper and some flour to free it.

10. Add the toppings: Spread the tomato topping over the dough, leaving a 1/2- inch border at the edges, then add the cheese and basil (for a different effect, put the basil on after baking). We prefer using well- spaced chunks of cheese, which gradually melt and spread (giving the crust a longer opportunity to crisp before the toppings burn). Drizzle a little olive oil over the pizza if desired.

11. Slide the pizza onto the preheated stone: Place the tip of the peel near the back of the stone, close to where you want the far edge of the pizza to land. Give the peel a few quick forward- and- back jiggles and pull it sharply out from under the pizza (if you're using a sheet pan, place it right on the stone). Check for doneness in 8 to 10 minutes, and turn the pizza around in the oven if one side is browning faster than the other. It may take up to 5 minutes more in the oven. Using a spatula may be helpful in getting the baked pizza back onto the peel. Allow to cool slightly, preferably on a wire cooling rack, so that the cheese sets. Buon appetito!

12. Store the remaining dough in the refrigerator in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days: You'll find that even one day's storage improves the flavor, texture, and the color of pizza and fl atbread crusts. The dough begins to ferment and take on sourdough characteristics. Cut off and shape more dough as you need it. The dough can also be frozen in 1/2- pound portions in an airtight container for up to 4 weeks; defrost overnight in the refrigerator prior to baking day.This is a particularly nice option for an egg- enriched dough, which has a 5- day refrigerator life.

VARIATION: Olive Oil Dough
Substitute 1/3 cup (21/2 ounces/70 grams) of olive oil for 1/3 cup of water, and the result is a marvelously flavorful, slightly richer pizza dough, or our preferred base for focaccia.
__________________________________________________________________________________
I tried to find the bakers percents and If I did it right making a cup of flour 125g and the water 236g

that makes the total flour about 937g and the water 826g.  1 tbs yeast?  that puts the percentage at close to .6, for a 14 day fermentation this seems wrong. 

1.  Has anyone tried this?
2.  Has anyone converted it to bakers percents?


Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 01:31:04 PM »
Flour (100%):959.19 g  |  33.83 oz | 2.11 lbs
Water (86%):824.9 g  |  29.1 oz | 1.82 lbs
IDY (.92%):8.82 g | 0.31 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.93 tsp | 0.98 tbsp
Salt (2.24%):21.49 g | 0.76 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.48 tsp | 1.49 tbsp
Total (189.16%):1814.4 g | 64 oz | 4 lbs | TF = N/A
Single Ball:226.8 g | 8 oz | 0.5 lbs

This is what I came up with using the calculator.  I have heard of people saying this worked well.  I can't see how.  Has anyone on the forum tried it?

Does it look like I did the conversions correctly?

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2012, 06:14:35 PM »
Maybe a year ago I made a quarter batch. I'll have to give it another go just for fun. And yes it's a very wet dough that is worked cold using a rolling pin and quite a bit of flour. I have some unbleached Better for Bread to use. Most photos I've seen on blogs using the recipe are rather, um, uninspiring..........perhaps it's their ovens.
Don

Offline Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3522
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2012, 08:04:47 PM »
I regularly go 7 days and they are still getting better at that point, but I use a lot less yeast than that.

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2012, 08:21:52 PM »
I agree with the length of fermentation.  I was especially curious about the unusual hydration and yeast %.  Do you think that the hydration allows the yeast amounts? 


buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2012, 08:46:51 PM »
I make this high hydration dough quite frequently : http://sites.google.com/site/hollosyt/quickrusticciabattapizza

Don
« Last Edit: February 15, 2012, 08:56:36 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2012, 08:58:15 PM »
Thanks for the link.  I am going to give that a try.  I will definitely have to use the parchment paper, I sometimes have trouble with 66% hydration. 

Thanks for your response. 

Offline Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3522
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2012, 09:04:24 PM »
I work in the area of his hydration normally but I think it has more to do with the balance of his salt and yeast, he uses proportionally even more salt to yeast than I do.  I have also done doughs down to 60ish percent for 7 days, so I don't think hydration, so long as there is enough, has much to do with it.

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2012, 07:40:52 AM »
I found my notebook page ......finally. :-[ The recipe I copied must have been from a blog using the bread book not the flatbread/pizza book which came later. The ingredient amounts called out are different than this one. I have a notation stating a lack of browning to the crust and an overly salty taste and not much else, so I assume I never followed up. ::) A fresh start is in order.
Don

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2012, 08:58:09 AM »
After seeing the procedure I thought it would be worth a shot for sheer convenience.  To be able to pull a dough ball out of the fridge over a 2-3 week period after making it just once.  I would say that if the salt could be toned down and perhaps some food for the yeast so that it would still brown in the later days of the fermentation it could be a good technique.  I play around with different things I see others trying but I seem to always go back to that Glutenboy recipe, with the 6-9 day cold fermentation.  That dough calls for ~.185% yeast which is a far cry from .9!  This is why I was wondering if the hydration is what kept it from over proofing? 

I am going to try this one soon.  Can't wait to see how yours turns out. 


buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2012, 09:08:57 AM »
If you carefully read the directions the dough is allowed to rise at room temperature, collapse and then be placed in the fridge. Removing a dough ball from time to time would also cause the mother dough to go through a mini punch down. My notes from before mention lightly dusting the top of the mother dough each time some is taken out, something I don't see in this recipe.
Don

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2012, 04:18:45 PM »
I have the mother dough ready to go in the fridge. The tape marks the just mixed dough line. Since taking the pic a few minutes ago it has collapsed about two inches from the top.
Don

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2012, 11:28:54 PM »
Now is that the recipe from above or a different one from the previous book you were talking about?  That is some serious rise!

Very good point about the numerous "punch downs"  I had not thought about that. 

Did you use all purpose flour?  I think when I try I will use bread flour. 

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2012, 06:26:38 AM »
I used the basic dough calculator here plugging in a thickness factor of .07 for 8 ten inch pizzas giving me a single ball weight of 156 grams. I opened the last of my hoarded Gold Medal Better for Bread flour as the recipe calls out to use unbleached flour. .7% IDY and 3% salt at 86% hydration. The new book recipe and the old one vary only in the amount of dough made and is very similar, not that much difference to be notable.
Don

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2012, 06:06:46 PM »
This is my first time working with such a high hydration so we'll see what happens.  I followed the same percents you did.  The only difference for comparisons later is that I scaled the recipe down to 3 dough balls.  I just finished mixing it together and it is now in the 2 hour bulk room temp fermentation period. 

The only problem with only 3 dough balls is that I will only be able to try three different days to see when peak flavor might be. 

I am hoping that this is at least serviceable because of how easy it is. 

Gregory

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2012, 06:27:33 PM »
Here are the pictures of the dough directly after the mix.

I put the lid on with the side that filters the ice so that it would breath.   

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2012, 09:36:45 PM »
Ah, History repeats itself. I baked number one in my anemic counter top oven and the same pale crust occured, just as a year or so ago. The cheese was going to burn so I pulled it out. When I went to cut it the edges made a crackling sound but no color. The taste was ok, didnīt taste unbaked, but not that great either. I was underwhelmed. Sunday I'll use my gas oven and see how it goes.
Don

Offline Pizza3.14

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
  • Location: NH
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2012, 02:45:55 PM »
Don,

That is too bad that you didn't get any browning.  Visually it makes the pizza unappealing.  Do you think that given more time it will develop a more complex flavor? 

Hope your results turn out better on Sunday. 

 

Offline Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3522
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2012, 03:19:46 PM »
Is that asadero on that pie Don?

buceriasdon

  • Guest
Re: 14 day cold fermentation?
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2012, 04:11:18 PM »
Tom, Nope, that's Oaxacan style, I find the two behave quite similar in their melting characteristics. I give Oaxocan a bit of an edge over Asadero in the flavor department.
Don


 

pizzapan