Author Topic: Sheeting  (Read 2610 times)

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Offline superdave

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Sheeting
« on: August 23, 2005, 11:57:11 PM »
I think I need help understanding the term "sheeting". I have been experimenting with the original Pizza Making thin crust recipe for close to a couple of years now.

I seem to be getting consistent results with the texture of the dough. I use the same 24 hour rise in the refridgerator, I use the same perforated Cutter pans, the same oven temperature, same cooking time.

My problem is about half the time the crust has that crackery, flakey, layered texture, and life is good. The other half of the time the crust has a bread-like texture with no layers.

I roll out the dough by hand with a rolling pin and continue work extra flour into it. Is this sheeting? I've also tried folding the dough back into a ball after rolling it out, and then rolling it out again. The second rolling out is really difficult and I haven't noticed that it makes enough of a difference in the texture to be worth the effort.

Can anyone help me understand the sheeting process, and share their techniques?

Thanks,
David


Offline Snowman

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Re: Sheeting
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2005, 06:40:07 PM »
I consider "sheeting" to be using a dough sheeter.  A dough sheeter is essentially two sets of metal rolling pins set at certain thickness and the dough is pushed through.  It's along the same concept as the old laundry wringers from years gone by.  It gets one pass through the first set (which are further from each other than the second set).  The dough is then turned 90 degrees and passed through the second set of rollers.  The dough is rolled exactly twice.  You just can't get that kind of result with a rolling pin by hand because of the sheer consistency and less "handling". 

"Sheeting" is a short-cut in getting the dough from a ball into a "skin" (crust base onto which you place toppings).  Sheeting will give you uniform results, fully duplicatable time after time.  Hand-slapping or hand-forming gives you more control over things like outer crust and such, but even in the most experienced hands, a slapped dough will still not be 100% uniform in thickness. 

Offline superdave

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Re: Sheeting
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2005, 10:30:00 AM »
Thanks, Snowman.

Sheeting or rolling out the dough doesn't sound like my problem after all. I guess I will go back to experimenting with ingredients. I'll start with slightly reducing the amounts of yeast and water.


Offline Lydia

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Re: Sheeting
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2005, 02:34:16 AM »
I use special elasticized bands on my extra-long and heavy rolling pin for consistent dough thickness (when it really matters, some recipes are horrid if they aren't rolled thin enough) but from what I understand the sheeters can press the drier doughs more efficiently than can be accomplished by manual rolling.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline superdave

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Re: Sheeting
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2005, 11:09:43 AM »
I really like the idea of the bands for consistency. However, my rolling pin isn't wide enough to accomodate a skin for a16" pan! The hunt is now on for a new rolling pin. Lydia, did you buy your extra-long and heavy rolling pin and the elasticized bands on-line?

David

Offline Lydia

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Re: Sheeting
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2006, 10:42:13 PM »
Sorry I didn't reply, I overlooked it.

I purchased them at Sur La Table. I'm sure they have them available in their online store. Let me know if you need help finding them.

Rolling pin brand was Victor Firth (sp)?
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


 

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