Author Topic: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust  (Read 4154 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2005, 09:02:18 PM »
Paul,

What Domino's does is not that unusual. Papa John's uses a blend of semolina, wheat flour and soy oil. It's apparently granular in nature and is called Dustinator. Randy does something similar with his American Pie dough, except that he uses semolina, cornmeal and flour. It gets worked into the dough to produce a marbling effect. I like it.

Adding semolina flour to all-purpose flour or bread flour should make the crust chewier. However, you shouldn't go overboard with it because too much will make the crust too chewy and it can lose a lot of its crispiness. The most common percentage I have seen is about 25-30% semolina. I had a New York style pizza that, according to the pizza maker, used 40-50% semolina. He used volumes (scoops) so I don't know what it was on a weight basis (although I don't think there would be a big difference). The pizza tasted perfectly fine and, had the pizza maker not told me, I wouldn't have been able to tell that there was semolina in the crust. The basic flour he used was a high-gluten flour. If you have a choice, you may want to get the fine semolina rather than a larger grind.

Peter


Offline paul260426

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #21 on: August 30, 2005, 10:09:45 PM »
Pete,

We are talking about wheat semolina, right?  Because I understand there is corn semolina and was wondering how this would be different from cornmeal.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #22 on: August 30, 2005, 10:22:35 PM »
Paul,

I am thinking of the wheat semolina. The term "semolina" is often used somewhat generically to describe something that is ground like wheat semolina. If corn is so ground, it is called "corn semolina"; if it's rice, it's called "rice semolina", and so on. I would think that corn semolina is more like corn flour, which is a finer grind of cornmeal.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 30, 2005, 10:24:57 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline paul260426

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #23 on: September 01, 2005, 04:47:45 PM »
Just made a  pizza and this time I added cornmeal to the dough as I made the pie.  I wanted a thin toasty pizza so I rolled this one out.  Well it ended up that the cornmeal got mixed in with the entire pizza as I goofed on the pie forming twice.  After I layed the pie on the pan I let it rise again for about 20 minutes then put it in a hot oven without sauce or anything else.  Let it cook for about 5 minutes then took it out and added sauce, toppings, and cheese.   The result was a pretty good pizza.   

It was a little to dry.   Which brings up a subject.  How does Pizza Hut get their pizzas crust sides oily.  Do they add the oil to the dough or do they put it on after the pizza is cooked? 

This pizza turned out toasty but still was not what I was reaching for.  I don't want the crust to sag at all.   It seems that when I put the sauce on, the sauce permeates the dough and makes it soggy.  Is there a way to prevent this from happening?  Could this be because I am allowing the pizza to sit to long in the oven.  I don't know what my oven temperature is but I am sure it is not 500 degrees.  Which means I probably cook it longer  in order to get a well cooked pizza.  Is this causing the soggy problem?

Feedback Appreciated.

Offline buzz

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2005, 10:00:30 AM »
Following the lead of a local pizza place that makes the best crispy thin crust I've ever had, I use AP flour with a very long knead (I use the dough cycle of my bread machine), followed by three separate room temperature rises. The result is thin, cracker-like, and crispy, with lots of crispy air pockets! I have to watch it because it can get too crispy.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dynamics of Good Pizza Crust
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2005, 10:47:39 AM »
buzz,

Would you mind posting your recipe and processing technique under the Cracker Style board?

Peter