Author Topic: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan  (Read 588 times)

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Online mitchjg

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Hi:

This weekend we went to A16 for the first time and, as part of the meal, we tried their Neapolitan pie.  It was the first time we had one anywhere (aside from pies I have cooked) We were disappointed....

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=13130.msg307456#msg307456

I decide to try Neapolitan pie my WFO to see how I could do.  The dough was a 36 hour dough fermented at 64 degrees with Ischia at 60% hydration.  Both were cooked in about 1:40 at something like 850 on the floor.

I think on the Margherita, I should have taken it out 10 - 20 seconds earlier.  It was a little "stiff."  The salami pie could have come out maybe 10 seconds sooner. 

Both tasted very good and my wife (my judge and jury) said they were better than the pie at A16. 

The oven is an FGM 700 (with the raised dome) that always takes quite awhile to heat up.  I domed the pies in the last 15 seconds to get them to brown.  Once I did dome them, they immediately changed color.

I would appreciate any and all pointers you can provide. 

Thanks!

Mitch


Offline TXCraig1

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What flour did you use?
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Online mitchjg

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GM Neapolitan Hearth.

- M

Offline TXCraig1

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Did the dough look fully fermented when you opened it?
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Online mitchjg

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It looked very much like "This ball is about ready" in your thread (maybe a drop more developed ) - How I make my NP dough.  The last hour I let it warm up to room temperature of around 70.  But, there were no gassy bubbles to pop on the rim or anything like that.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20477.msg202048#msg202048

Do you think I should have let it go further?

- M
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 10:36:42 PM by mitchjg »

Offline TXCraig1

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What was the ball weight?
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Online mitchjg

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244 each.  Put them in the oven on 12 inch paddles.  I think my plates are the same ones as yours - 13 across, etc. 

Offline TXCraig1

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I'm a bit surprised you did 1:40 with an 850 deck. I would have thought a bit quicker than that unless the walls furthest from the fire are well below that. That second pie looks pretty darn good, however I don't think a bit more dome heat would hurt. I'd try to get the walls farthest from the fire up to at least 900 and have open flames next time.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Online mitchjg

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Thanks Craig.  There is a lot of rapid drop off on the floor from near the fire to the far wall.  When the center of the cooking area (excluding the fire, just the usable space) is at 850, the floor near the wall is probably under 800.  I did not check, but based on experience I would bet the far walls, say a few inches above the floor, were in the low 800s. 

I had a pretty good flame going, but I guess a super blazing one?

Thanks a lot for helping me.

- Mitch

Offline TXCraig1

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You don't need a bonfire - just open flames that are rolling onto the dome at least a little - halfway is good. I wouldn't be surprised if the wall across from the fire was under 800. Cheek it next time several times throughout the bake. You might be surprised with what you find.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Online mitchjg

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2014, 11:01:03 PM »
Will do. 

I am not sure what to do to raise those wall temperatures in terms of oven management.  I had the core (the FGM thermometer is set deep in the core) at about 860.

Thanks again.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 11:09:38 PM by mitchjg »

Offline Tampa

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2014, 09:50:24 AM »
Lots of good coaching above.  It makes for a good read and better understanding.   :chef:

Dave

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2014, 10:25:03 PM »
Will do. 

I am not sure what to do to raise those wall temperatures in terms of oven management.  I had the core (the FGM thermometer is set deep in the core) at about 860.

Thanks again.

I preheat the oven with the fire pretty close to the wall on the opposite side of where the fire will be when I bake. You don't need as much heat on the wall behind the fire so might as well heat the wall you do need to be hot as much as possible when you preheat. That and preheat longer.
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Online mitchjg

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2014, 10:36:38 PM »
I will try that.  You know, I actually did the opposite, but only for half-good reason.  I had recently built a couple of fires where the floor temperature was very low relative to the core and the walls.  I realized that there was to much ash and half wasted coals piled up on the floor and it was insulating it from heating up. 

I then switched things around so that after the first hour or two of heating, i kept the fire on the left (I bake on the right) so that the right would heat up from flames, etc. but not become insulated by the ash.

The floor heated up much better but, obviously that was not helping the wall.  I will heat up as you described AND watch out for too much ash, etc.

Thanks fort your help, much appreciated.

- Mitch

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2014, 10:50:33 PM »
My floor will generally glow a dull red for a few seconds when I move the fire to the other side of the oven. It takes an hour or so for the heat to even out.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Totti

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2014, 05:13:50 PM »
I will try that.  You know, I actually did the opposite, but only for half-good reason.  I had recently built a couple of fires where the floor temperature was very low relative to the core and the walls.  I realized that there was to much ash and half wasted coals piled up on the floor and it was insulating it from heating up. 

I then switched things around so that after the first hour or two of heating, i kept the fire on the left (I bake on the right) so that the right would heat up from flames, etc. but not become insulated by the ash.

The floor heated up much better but, obviously that was not helping the wall.  I will heat up as you described AND watch out for too much ash, etc.

Thanks fort your help, much appreciated.

- Mitch

Well noted. Keep turning over the coals and ensuring the soot on the bottom goes on the top every so often and you'll keep the floor zinging.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Please critique these pies - first attempt in a long time at Neapolitan
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2014, 07:55:57 PM »
Well noted. Keep turning over the coals and ensuring the soot on the bottom goes on the top every so often and you'll keep the floor zinging.

Just as a point of reference, I don't do that. I just keep putting logs on top.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.