Author Topic: Milk and bakers' percentages?  (Read 735 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tzdvl

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6
Milk and bakers' percentages?
« on: March 27, 2012, 10:14:03 AM »
Hi, all,
I have just recently started learning about using bakers' percentages rather than volume measurements in making my dough.

My wife prefers the softer taste/texture of the crust when milk is used for part of the liquid in the dough. The recipe I have used for years (similar to the pizza dough recipe in Julia Child's The Way to Cook) calls for 1/2 cup water and 3/4 cup milk for 3 cups bread flour.

I realize that the milk in the dough will affect how the crust browns during baking, but I am interested to know how (or if) the use of milk needs to be taken into account when converting a recipe into bakers' percentages.

I welcome any advice you can offer.

Thanks!

Ken


Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Milk and bakers' percentages?
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2012, 10:34:54 AM »
but I am interested to know how (or if) the use of milk needs to be taken into account when converting a recipe into bakers' percentages.

I welcome any advice you can offer.

Thanks!

Ken


Yes, Ken both the water and the milk would be expressed as a percentage of the weight of the flour.  (just like the yeast and salt)
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline tzdvl

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6
Re: Milk and bakers' percentages?
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2012, 05:35:40 PM »
Yes, Ken both the water and the milk would be expressed as a percentage of the weight of the flour.  (just like the yeast and salt)

I understand that the liquids will need to be calculated as percentages, but does that mean that is necessary to calculate a separate percentage for each one, or can the TOTAL amount of liquid be expressed as one percentage?

I guess what I want to know is:

If I have a recipe that calls for 3 cups of flour and 1 1/2 cups of water, the amounts can be expressed as percentages. If I decide to replace half the water with milk (ie 3/4 cup of each, giving the same relative percentage of total liquid), would there be a significant effect on the recipe?

Or, does substituting milk for some or all of the water in a given recipe significantly affect the % hydration of the dough?

I hope my question makes sense - as you can tell, I'm just beginning to get a handle on this stuff!

Ken

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends