Author Topic: converting wood oven to gas...commercial  (Read 11879 times)

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Offline Fourlix

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2012, 10:15:02 AM »
Giving credit where it is due.....I found Jeff Verasano's website shortly after buying the "secrets of the pizzaria" recipe.  I think that has to have been about 10 years ago?  I only found this forum about two years ago, when I was gearing up to go commercial.
     Jeff's website is still up, and is still the best and most thorough discussion of pizza dough I have yet seen.  I have seen some professional baker's sites lately with some more intense discussion of dough temperatures than Jeff covers, but Jeff's info really does get you where you need to be.
      Secrets of the pizzaria was a push in the right direction, but the bitch is from Dominos....How good could that be?  But I got the high protein flour, KA Sir Lancelot, and cold rise from her. There is a lot of discussion, or scuttlebutt on NYC water. Water out west is loaded with minerals. I used to use bottled distilled water, but thanks to Grimaldi's in Tucson, I discovered that a good water filtration system works just as well. 
     But  I got that zing, that tangy sourdough like flavor I was looking for because of Jeff and his discussion of hydration and secondary enzymatic action. I may have found All-trumps on here, as I used KA when I was still amateur, but then I also discovered that I could make great pizza with just good bread flour too. I think one of the real pluses to All trumps is the addition of malted barley flour.  What is good for beer is good for pizza......


Offline pizzaneer

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2012, 10:23:24 AM »
Thats interesting.  Currently theres a lot of discussion going on in the NY style thread about different types of flour used in the "old-fashioned" pizzerias compared to what they use these days.  One thing that was mentioned was that they used to use bread flour, but eventually went more to the high gluten flour.

Heres the link for that thread.  I think you'll find it interesting.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19253.msg188257.html#msg188257
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline SinoChef

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #42 on: June 15, 2012, 09:31:26 AM »
Fourlix,

Thank you taking the time out of your day to post this. Very informative and succinct. Never mind the negative responses. I actually may need your advice in a couple months for the never ending, “next project” here. I have never used one, and for a 21,000 square meter, tri level monstrosity, open in lees then 2 months I don’t have time to learn it. And my employer knows nothing, only that it aesthetically pleasing, and trendy to have one of these things in an open kitchen.

 
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Too often Americans take a good idea and get carried away with it, as in taking it too literally...Like Pasta Al Dente.  No Italian would eat the American version of pasta cooked al dente,,,to them it is undercooked.  To me it is raw flour
.

That killed me. That’s makes 2 of us saying the emperor has not clothes. Raw bloody flour packed up in my molars, and I am supposed to sit there and be impressed because someone learned a new catch phrase? Crunch,crunch,crunch.

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We make fresh pasta and cook it to order.  It is never dried. Occasionally we get somebody asking, or complaining, for their pasta to be al dente.  Fresh pasta cannot be al dente because it has never been dried.  It is done when the flour is cooked, like all pasta, even the dried kind.
Numerous times I have been rebuked in my own dinning room in the US, for not “knowing” how to cook pasta “properly”. Dried is one thing, but when I take the time out of my day to make fresh, and get complaints……

Last hotel I had there. 6 inch hotel pan, filled with water, and some Liquid smoke. Spare ribs poached for 6 hours in water with S&P. Covered in bottled KC master piece. Umm, no.

 I went a bought a home smoker from Target (don’t tell the Health dept.) and started doing some baby backs out on my loading dock. Holy hell, what a mistake! I made some people very angry with ribs you could not mash into paste with your fork.
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Why so many Americans have developed a taste for undercooked flour is beyond me.
That and risotto. Risotto, risotto, risotto. Respect it, or don’t serve it. I think I had the only restaurant in MPLS that did not have risotto on the menu in the mid 90’s. I remember that, because I actually had some people thank me for not doing it.

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And another thing.  This thread is about CONVERTING A WOOD OVEN TO GAS......COMMERCIAL.   Not any of the crap you backyard WFO purists are talking about.   Not a deck oven,  Not achieving perfect Neapolitan at 850, but converting a Commercial oven from wood to gas.  PERIOD
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You guys have done nothing but bitch and moan because I made gas work for me, and it might work for someone else. 
     If you are not interested in a gas conversion why are you reading this thread other than to just flame me?


+1

Looked at your site. Your not a dedicated pizza restaurant. You a restaurant that delivers a dinning experience.

Success is found at your till count at the end of the night.

 Not if you have imported Italian water from the tap of your Italian grandmothers home, and tomatoes picked by a one legged, blind guito leper from the hills of Tibet. Who has perfected the pinch and twist method of harvesting, rather then the direct pull from san marzano tomato plant which is located at at 160.6 latitude, and 5.68 longitude. Which has been decided to be the most ultimate spot on earth to grow a tomato, according to “experts”.

Good on ya.

Thanks for the info.

Offline Fourlix

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2012, 05:34:05 PM »
Thank you.  Pizza provides an inexpensive alternative to our more expensive BBQ brisket, ribs, pasta, grilled salmon or seabass, and most recently steaks, (hence the new gas grill).  Silver City, New Mexico is a small town with a struggling economy (like everywhere else), and our customers need that option.
       Pizza out west has always been a real challenge, (kind of like Mexican food back east, yuk). Our town, population 15,000, only has Papa Johns, Pizza Hut and Dominos, and none of them serve beer.  It is big enough to have McDonald's and Burger King as well, but doesn't reach the population level needed to support an Outback, TGI Fridays, Olive Garden, Chili's etc.  So that is good for me, as I am trying to fill that "dining experience" you mention.  And because it is a small town I have to rely heavily on repeat customers, and give them enough variety that they don't get bored with the menu. My restaurant is about half the size of one of these big chain "dining experience" restaurants, with 100 seats.   And because I designed and built it myself, it cost a tiny fraction of what a "chili's" costs.  I already owned the building which was my failed ATV/Motorcycle dealership, which was blown away by the new economy. We had wanted to add a restaurant to the Dealership, and I had already started accumulating equipment, so when the dealership went down in flames, it was the restaurant idea that we went with.
       We have tried a lot of different things, ideas, and menu items.  My crystal ball doesn't work very well though, and it is amazing what works and what doesn't. I am very fortunate that the original premise of good pizza, fresh pasta, good cold beer, real BBQ, interesting decor and cute waitresses has been successful.
    And, pizza sales are up, I am using one less employee, customers like the new pizzas better, and we have not had one customer complaint about not having wood fired pizza any more. I also changed the menu to read "Brick oven Pizza".

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2012, 06:07:27 PM »
Thats a great story, and I'm glad to hear things are working out well.   So many businesses bit the big one, or have just limped along since 2007, my own included.  At the end of the day, your happiness is the most important thing.

Could we see some more pictures of the cute waitr... er pizza?  :P
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2012, 07:17:04 PM »
Exactly on all cylinders.  I also looked at your site, and your concept seems to be the same as another member is attempting to open, Jak123, here:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19431.0.html

He should call you and get the scoop.  Good luck and keep it going!

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #46 on: June 16, 2012, 11:21:36 PM »


Could we see some more pictures of the cute waitr... er pizza?  :P
Ha!  Nice try Brian...maybe they could add a new section to the site, eh?    >:D

Bob
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Offline SinoChef

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2012, 01:18:10 AM »

What are you saving in just fuel costs every month with the switch?

And then over all, what do you guess, with out the hassle of extra maintenance, staffing, etc..

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #48 on: June 17, 2012, 07:17:25 AM »
Ha!  Nice try Brian...maybe they could add a new section to the site, eh?    >:D

Bob

That would be the Hot Pizza topic!   ;D
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2012, 10:18:25 AM »
Here we go.................. :angel:

Does that nice looking young lady work for you Pizzaneer?
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 10:37:01 AM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: converting wood oven to gas...commercial
« Reply #50 on: August 08, 2012, 01:40:11 PM »
I will certainly agree the MAM 505 is a mutha to get up to temperature.  From a cold start, it takes 4 hours.  Even then, the dome is not all white.  It takes quite a while to master or at least, get the hang of it.  It came out of a college town restaurant that made pizza.  They had a deck oven in the kitchen and burned wood in the damn thing just for the effect.  A college kid doesn't stand a chance.  Once home, it took forever to burn it out. 
It's nice you found a solution for your oven management.