Author Topic: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?  (Read 2475 times)

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Offline basetwo

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How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« on: September 08, 2005, 01:26:11 AM »
I love Beau Jo's pizza.  I'd be interested in how it's classified.  They sell the pies by the pound and they are just massive.  (Coronary anyone?)  I've eaten at Beau Jo's a few times, and it's only on the front range of Colorado.  If you look at their menu here: http://www.beaujos.com/orderpizza.html  (download the menu in .pdf format on the left) you can get an idea of what they do.  A pretty much totally custom pie that THEY call "Colorado Style".

If I wanted to make something similar, what style recipe would you suggest I start with?
« Last Edit: September 08, 2005, 01:31:37 AM by basetwo »
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2005, 06:37:11 AM »
Sorry I can't help you with your question. I'm sure these folks bake some fine pies, but "Tofu Pizza" is abut the funniest pie I've ever heard of. And who came up with the name "Prairie Pie"? Prairie oysters and cow pies come immediately to mind. I think I'm going to be ill. And "Crustless Pizzas"?


Bill/SFNM

Offline basetwo

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2005, 07:52:27 AM »
Sorry I can't help you with your question. I'm sure these folks bake some fine pies, but "Tofu Pizza" is abut the funniest pie I've ever heard of. And who came up with the name "Prairie Pie"? Prairie oysters and cow pies come immediately to mind. I think I'm going to be ill. And "Crustless Pizzas"?


Bill/SFNM


LOL... yeah, the tofu is definitely for a niche market.  Of course many of the items are rather tongue-in-cheek when it comes to naming them.  I'm sure their naming the Prarie Pie was to get the sort of effect you mention.  If you read the last page of the menu about the "founder" of Beau Jo's you get a taste if their sense of humor.
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Offline chiguy

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2005, 11:57:31 PM »
 Hi, Base2
 I would like to welcome you to the forum. I cannot answer your question and have never tried this place. I can tell you that we are pretty serious about pizza making on this site.Some of us members use Mixers,scales to weigh ingrediants,dough thermometers,and all types of flour.  I suggest you start with a recipe from the main page, N.Y. style maybe? Even if you dont have these items, you can still make a good pie from the recipes on this site, maybe even better than  Beau Jo's.  Goodluck 

Offline Ronzo

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2005, 09:21:11 AM »
Quote
I'd be interested in how it's classified.

"gimmick" pizza...
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

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Offline basetwo

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2005, 01:21:49 AM »
LOL, yeah, there's alot of gimmick there, but it's good also.

I'm not actually looking to create this type of pizza yet, but I was just kind of wondering if it would be considered a take-off of something like an "American" style pizza with rolled edges to accomodate more toppings, or what.  I'm definitely a noob to all this, so that's why I thought I'd ask.

For starters, I've already made one dough ball using Randy's simple recipe for American style.  Since I bought my wife a KitchenAid mixer not too long ago, I thought it'd be an easy recipe to follow for now.
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Offline Snowman

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2005, 12:42:17 PM »
"gimmick" pizza...

I have to take exception there, and I've never heard of the place.  The menu has lots of choices, looks good, and frankly, that pizza at the very bottom looks darned well edible.  Sure, there's some gimmick marketing, but you have to have good food to back it up.  From the poster's questioning, I'd say they have that.  I'd say it's one of the better marketing/menu combos I've seen in a good while.   I wish I were as creative.

Offline cdodson

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2005, 01:19:46 PM »
Creative indeed.  As long as your as creative in the kitchen as you are in the advertising...you're doing something right.  You're right about the pie at the bottom.  Reminds me of a local joint called Pasquales that would smother the topping with mozzarella.  Mmmmmmmm....
Carey

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2005, 02:10:39 PM »
Snowman,

I fully understand what you are saying, but I can also understand where Ron (nytxn) is coming from. Like many others who moved from the New York City area to other parts of the country, the loss of access to really good NY street (or even NY elite) pizzas is hard to take. To native New Yorkers, a good NY pizza is part of the heart and in the blood, and everything else pales by comparison. It's the same thing for native Chicagoans who find themselves in parts of the country where no one even knows what a deep-dish pizza or a stuffed pizza is, or even a thin cracker-style pizza. It's the stuff, of course, that makes for rivalries between New York and Chicago and Neapolitan and St. Louis and California and Old Forge and other regional styles of pizza, with the proponents of each style having a passion that may well defy logic but is nonetheless genuine and sincere. From what I sense from reading many of the posts of our members, especially new members, many of them are here at the forum to fill a void in their pizza lives and to find that magical pizza recipe that they can make in their own homes to remind them of their roots and recapture the warm feelings they had for their favorite style pizza of years past.

I happened to have grown up in an area of the country where no particular pizza style dominated (the Greek pan pizzas possibly) so I didn't develop any preconceived notions about any style or attachment to any style. I like and make all kinds of pizzas, including some that most people will turn their noses up at (like my oyster pizza or my prosciutto/fig jam/Gorgonzola/rosemary pizza :)). So I would be the last one to proclaim anyone's pizza as a gimmick. I suppose if enough people are willing to pay for and eat any pizza, and there is a profit in it for the pizza operator, it can't be a gimmick. But if I was born and grew up in NYC or Chicago, I could well find myself using the "g" word.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 10, 2005, 02:28:35 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Snowman

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2005, 03:44:57 PM »
Well, when NYTXN gets his little self up to Dallas, there's a guy here that says he makes authentic NY pizza.  He's got a Jersey accent, so the geography is right.  He starts with whole tomatoes (well, canned whole), and makes his own sauce.  He also refuses to use fake sausage (it's his "sacred cow"*).  AND, he's got a Rotoflex oven and loves to talk, so he makes great company.  It's http://www.cafenostra.com/ and he's located on really lower Greenville.  :)



Offline basetwo

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2005, 05:58:02 PM »

I happened to have grown up in an area of the country where no particular pizza style dominated (the Greek pan pizzas possibly) so I didn't develop any preconceived notions about any style or attachment to any style. I like and make all kinds of pizzas...

I didn't grow up with a dominant style either.  From my childhood (and now when I visit family) I remember Monicals in central-south Illinois which has a great thin-crust, I also remember Godfather's Pizza in northern Wisconsin which had deep-dish and ate my fair share of Domino's, Little Ceasar's and later Papa John's, etc.  when in college and the Air Force.  I would like to learn many different styles because I can't imagine eating only one style of pizza.  I'd like to choose based on my cravings, mood, or whatever.  Also there's really not any good pizza place within a 50 mile radius of where I live. 

I'm definitely not a "connoisseur" and I can eat the pizza chain pizzas, but I only consider them to be fair to good in taste.  I think of the pizza chains, I prefer Papa John's the best.

If I can get good at making a few types, I'll have to pay close attention when I'm at Monical's again.  I know there are others on this forum that'd like to duplicate their pies.
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Offline Ronzo

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2005, 07:26:15 PM »
Thanks for coming to my defense, Pete-zza. You hit the nail on the head.


I'm blessed to have found some places here in Austin that come very close to the pizza  grew up with, so I don't 'miss' it as much, but if I only knew of pizza as the way it's made by some of these places around here, I'd never want it.

Like Papa John's latest 'creation' (MUTATION ;D)... Chicken Bacon Ranch Pizza?

*shudders and gags*

I see a lot of the types of pizza on that site, not to mention the goofy 'history' written as the same thing... marketing gimmicks.

And snowman, I have my own Jersey dude here in Austin to visit. He makes the real deal, and I thank the good Lord for him. ;D
« Last Edit: September 11, 2005, 07:46:53 PM by nytxn »
Fuggheddabowdit!

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Offline whyrph

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2005, 07:58:59 PM »
I used to live in Colorado, and I have to second (or third, or fourth?) that Beaujo's is definitely NOT gimmick pizza.  It has gimmick marketing, but the pizza itself rocks.

So I would also like to know how to make Beaujo's style, since I so rarely get to have it (I'm in Michigan now, :( ).

Basically it's really thick stuff with a slightly sweet, very thick edge crust, and lots of toppings (several layers of cheese, toppings, sauce, etc).  The crust is intended to be eaten with honey after finishing the pizza (really good, especially with the whole wheat crust).

Offline rawcalls

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Re: How would you classify Beau Jo's pizza?
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2005, 01:20:05 PM »
BeauJo's is really good pizza!  Thank god there are creative people that dare to make pizza different than what people from New York or Chicago think is the only wat to make/eat a pizza.  I can totally appreciate the desire to have pizza the way you remember it from New York or Chicago, but don't think that everything else is a gimmick.  Especially if you've never had it. 


 

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