Author Topic: Why marble for prep surface? Historically and in the present?  (Read 6610 times)

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Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Why marble for prep surface? Historically and in the present?
« Reply #25 on: April 05, 2012, 01:15:02 PM »
It's certainly softer, but I don't know about porosity. I have seen some pretty porous granites with huge crystals in them. I am not as versed in marble, but I recall it being a tighter more uniform surface. I think it depends upon the piece because I have seen it go both ways.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2012, 01:24:07 PM by DNA Dan »


buceriasdon

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Re: Why marble for prep surface? Historically and in the present?
« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2012, 03:56:00 PM »
I can post other links if need be: http://www.asgranite.com/choose_stone.aspx
I have worked with both over the years and without a doubt marble is more porous than granite hence the reason marble stains more easily.
Don

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Why marble for prep surface? Historically and in the present?
« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2012, 04:35:04 PM »
It's much more complicated than just the porosity. See http://www.stonecaretechniques.com/6_m.htm for a good discussion.

The main concern is absortion of liquids by the stone. Marble is more absorbent because the porosity is physically more interconnected. In granite its more "fractured" and random depending upon the makeup of the stone. They are pretty close actually, but it's the hardness that makes granite more desirable.

I don't want to argue the technicals, but to answer the OP's question, I say use whatever feels good, cleans well and passes inspection. Marble in the kitchen is a historical thing, until granite was cheap enough to mine, cut, polish, etc. for the mass market. Think of it this way, if you wanted a really heavy surface back then, you used a butcher block or some thick wooden bench. When that went out of style due to health concerns, stainless steel and stone were the alternatives to increase sanitation. Marble at one time was cheap and readily available.