Author Topic: Cold Forming...bad?  (Read 1051 times)

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Offline TimEggers

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Cold Forming...bad?
« on: September 08, 2005, 12:56:25 PM »
What a terrible day today!  I was forming my pizza on my peel when the pizza stuck.  So I gave it a jerk and it ripped the pizza (fully dressed) right in half!  I was livid (and smashed my cutting board or make shift wooden peel) into a million pieces.  So I retreated to the living room.  Then I remembered that I had some older dough (4 days).  It was still cold in the fridge and I didn't have time to properly warm it on the counter like I normally do. 

Well I wanted pizza, at any cost.  So I smelled the dough and did not smell any hint of over fermentation so I decided to see if I could form it at all.  To my surprise it was very easy to form even though it was cold.  I was even able to toss the dough and it stretched wonderfully!  I thought I'd let it warm on the peel now that it's formed.  It really did form wonderfully so this may be a happy accident.  I think it formed well because I use a higher hydration (64%) than I used to (60%).

My question is this a bad thing to do?  Have I damaged the dough somehow by not letting it warm before hand forming?

Update:   I just baked the pizza and I don't think it hurt my crumb...
« Last Edit: September 08, 2005, 01:55:13 PM by TimEggers »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold Forming...bad?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2005, 02:39:56 PM »
Tim,

Are you sure you aren't using the same "crumb" photo over and over again? ;D.

To address your question, the risk you run when you form the dough into a skin without a counter warm up is that the dough may form big bubbles when the pizza hits the oven. Many people like the bubbles (especially kids) and fight over who is going to get the slices with the biggest bubbles, but pizza operators don't because this usually means they have to use bubble poppers to deflate the bubbles, which can be a real pain.  If this becomes a persistent problem, they often end up having to use dough dockers (a roller with a bunch of metal or plastic pins) to dock the dough to mitigate (not necessarily completely eliminate) the problem.

A dough that has undergone sufficient fermentation, and especially a long, cold fermentation (at least overnight), is less prone to bubbling. The standard advice to avoid bubbling is to make sure the dough reaches a counter temperature of at least 55 degrees F before shaping. I usually shoot for at least 60 degrees F. How long it will take to reach that temperature will depend on room temperature. This means that it will usually take longer in winter than in summer.

Peter


Offline TimEggers

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Re: Cold Forming...bad?
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2005, 01:11:49 AM »
No Peter it's an all new picture... 8)

Need proof?  Take a look...

Damn I'm good!  8)

Or is it lucky?  ???

Yeah..it's LUCK!

Offline Lydia

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Re: Cold Forming...bad?
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2005, 04:07:07 AM »
I have cold formed thin crust recipes using powdered non-fat milk as a dough relaxer. But when I do this with dough that has been refridgerated 3 or more days. The dough seem to relax to the point that it formed much more easily (didn't tear easily, but lost its bounce-back/elasticity) and it dosen't develop the 2-3 Large bubbles as usual.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


 

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