Author Topic: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza  (Read 444 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Offline Ovenray

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2016, 08:38:49 PM »
What is your personal take on such a business setup Pete-zza, if you dont mind me asking ?
I'm grateful for all things learned from you folks.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 09:24:51 PM »
What is your personal take on such a business setup Pete-zza, if you dont mind me asking ?
Ovenray,

I am perhaps not a good one to give an opinion but as I see it there are many facets to the question. First, technology will always evolve to replace human labor, especially when the labor is of a type that can be replaced by machines and other technology (including AI) and still allow for profit. For example, Foxxconn, the Chinese company that makes the iPhones for Apple, is replacing 60,000 jobs with robots: http://fortune.com/2016/05/26/foxconn-factory-robot-workers/. That will mean the potential loss of jobs in the U.S. unless our workers can work for less than the robots. Apple will not be bringing jobs back to the U.S., as the politicians will have us believe.

On the food front, there is at least one company that has equipment that can make burgers to order without need for any employees. And there are kiosks that customers will use to order their burgers. These stories often come up when states, and the federal government, propose increases in the minimum wage. Food service is not a high margin business and increases in labor costs encourages substitution of labor with machines.

The economist John Maynard Keynes envisioned a society where the work week would be 15 hours and where the challenge would be how to manage all of the leisure time. Of course, people loved the idea. The writer Eric Barnouw, in 1957, predicted that as work became easier and more machine-based, people would look to leisure to give their lives meaning. Even today, there is a sizable part of the population, notably young people without college degrees, who do not work at all, and spend most of their spare time in leisure pursuits. This means TV, phones, games, computers, the Internet, social media, and living at home with Mom and Dad. And they are not complaining. But they will not be contributing much to society. 

Robert Gordon has written a controversial book where he posits that all of the major and meaningful inventions have already been invented, such as electricity, the telephone, aircraft, automobiles, refrigeration, microwave ovens, technology that took people from the farms and into factories, and so on and so forth. He does not see technology such as the iPhone and related toys as having the same impact as the inventions of the last hundred years (my recollection is that he covered the period of 1870 to 1970).

So, as I see it, one of the major challenges of the next several decades may be how do we address the needs of our people if technology replaces a good part of the work that they once did. And there is virtually no job that can be spared such replacement. In the past, the new technology created new jobs to replace the old jobs, and in greater number and at greater pay, but if Robert Gordon is right, that might not take place this time. Those who take issue with Gordon sometime point to biotechnology as the new frontier but the adoption of that technology will have its own set of challenges.

Peter

 


Offline sodface

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2016, 10:05:29 PM »
Interesting observations Peter and a very interesting topic.  I saw a clip from an old show from the 50's or so where the narrator was talking about what the future would be like, and he mentioned the abbreviated work week because technology advancements would allow us all to throttle back.  Fat chance.

This quote has been making the rounds so you may have seen it but I thought it was pretty good and kind of on topic:

Quote
I'm not scared of a computer passing the turing test... I'm terrified of one that intentionally fails it.

Do you think robots will ever replace forum moderators?  Or have they already???  :P (This is a joke about the who is Peta-zza thread)
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 10:20:32 PM by sodface »
Carl

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 11:00:11 PM »
Carl,

Not long ago, I got caught up in an interactive voice response experience with American Airlines where I was asked so many questions that I felt I was talking with a real person. It was like a successful Turing test. But most of my IVR experiences are problematic where I end up in dead ends and have to hang up and start all over again. But IVR is a good example of replacing people with technology.

I suspect that forum moderators are irreplaceable, Lol. It would take some fancy algorithm to curate what our members say in their posts. I suppose the algorithm could detect certain words that suggest a possible problem and move the comments offline for a real person to review. Some online blogs and the like have discontinued comments altogether because people can be abusive and offensive.

Peter


Offline petef

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2016, 03:41:28 AM »
It seems to me the one process to automate for pizza making is the spinning of the dough to form the pizza. Does anyone know if this has ever been attempted?

Offline Ovenray

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2016, 05:01:52 AM »
Thanks for sharing your observations Pete-zza.


This quote has been making the rounds so you may have seen it but I thought it was pretty good and kind of on topic:
I'm not scared of a computer passing the turing test... I'm terrified of one that intentionally fails it.

That is an interesting quote by itself and also pretty much in line with what movies like 'Terminator' and 'the Matrix' are based on.
I'm grateful for all things learned from you folks.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2016, 08:28:50 AM »
It seems to me the one process to automate for pizza making is the spinning of the dough to form the pizza. Does anyone know if this has ever been attempted?
pete,

If anyone could do that, I think the Japanese would be the most capable of doing it since they pretty much lead the world in that kind of robotics. But I suspect that a dough press of some sort would be the way of opening up dough balls where volume--not artisan pizza making--is involved.

Peter

Offline Ovenray

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2016, 08:58:51 AM »
The closest 'they' have gotten to robotics till now must be the level of automation in the frozen pizza factories but that is where the 'crusts' (crackers) are stamped out of rollled sheets of dough.

I'm grateful for all things learned from you folks.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2016, 09:03:23 AM »
Home Run Inn, the famous Chicago-area pizza chain, decided to make frozen versions of the pizzas sold in its stores for sale at retail. They use dough presses in their production line. They also use dough presses in ther stores.

Peter

Offline petef

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2016, 02:01:59 PM »
pete,

If anyone could do that, I think the Japanese would be the most capable of doing it since they pretty much lead the world in that kind of robotics. But I suspect that a dough press of some sort would be the way of opening up dough balls where volume--not artisan pizza making--is involved.

Peter


I could only find one machine for making pizzas

A video demo. It compresses the dough.
No spinning, but they get a similar effect.
Sprizza - l'unica stendipizza a freddo


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Offline Giggliato

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Re: Hungry startup uses robots to grab slice of pizza
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2016, 11:46:48 AM »
I still want to see that truck in action, it sounds hilarious. 56 ovens?? Don't hit any bumps in the road!!