Author Topic: Leoparding  (Read 3438 times)

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Offline scott123

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2012, 09:10:15 PM »
Holy crap that's quite the bake time. That will seriously affect your sales volume.

That was a typo.  60 second, not 60 minute. It's been fixed.


Offline scott123

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2012, 09:23:49 PM »
Jamie, for a 3-4 minute bake with whole meal and par baking, those look very good. Are you using a torch to get the leoparding?

Offline jamieg

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2012, 11:47:41 PM »
Jamie, for a 3-4 minute bake with whole meal and par baking, those look very good. Are you using a torch to get the leoparding?

Well, that was my original question.  Sometimes, I get a lot of leoparding and sometimes only a little.  Clearly, heat is a factor - as if the oven is up to its max - the chances of leoparding are much greater.

However, it's not clear to me if it is predominantly the heat coming side on from the burners or from above - I suspect side on.

I also suspect - there must be other factors, i.e. hydration or age of dough, but I really don't know.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2012, 12:12:43 AM »
I think you are right about there being a lot of factors. I suspect there is more than one way to skin the cat so to speak.

A couple things that I have noticed that seem to work when taken together - 1) long fermentation time, 2) very hot oven, and very hot in all directions, 3) cool dough

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline jamieg

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2012, 12:24:14 AM »
'all directions' would presumably be below, above and side-on heat.  The side on factor is what interests me.

Can anybody point to examples of leoparding on a pizza cooked in a electric or gas oven?

I suspect there are none - even with ovens run at very high temperatures.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2012, 12:28:53 AM »
'all directions' would presumably be below, above and side-on heat.  The side on factor is what interests me.

Can anybody point to examples of leoparding on a pizza cooked in a electric or gas oven?

I suspect there are none - even with ovens run at very high temperatures.


Yes, all directions including the bottom, but for leoparding, a balanced high heat from the top and ALL sides is what really matters.

Notwithstanding, it can be done in a home oven with a broiler. Here are some fine examples baked in home ovens:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10024.0.html
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11654.0.html

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline jamieg

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #26 on: April 08, 2012, 12:33:45 AM »
wow. I'm was completely wrong.

Incredible pizzas.

Thanks.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2012, 12:58:53 AM »
Another thing I noticed looking at some pictures - too much bench flour of the top of the skin might supress leoparding.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #28 on: April 12, 2012, 11:54:10 PM »
Hey Jamie,

I'm surprised nobody has suggested a 2stone oven. Check out the 2stone pics thread.

RKP
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
 Brillat-Savarin

Offline jamieg

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Re: Leoparding
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2012, 12:36:49 AM »
A few months have past and so I thought I'd update this post - once again - I would appreciate any feedback - on the topic of leoparding in relation to different types of ovens.

See attached pics for my latest pizzas.

I've scrapped using wholemeal flour.  It's not a smart move if you want puffed up, light, crispy borders.

I've tweaked my recipe and methodology such that every pizza now has well-risen borders and at least a fair amount of leoparding - sometimes the leoparding goes completely off the scale.

I'm still using my small home-made clay oven which gets very hot - though I don't really know how hot - and has a fair amount of sideways heat - both because the gas flame is literally to one side of the pizza - and the clay walls radiate the heat very well throughout the oven.

However, I've just tested my dough in the gas oven I intend to buy - which has separate temperature controls for the floor and ceiling - both reaching 500c.  Unfortunately, yet again - while the base cooked well - and the cheese and tomato - the borders remained colourless and not fully cooked. In other words - it didn't work at all.

Whilst there are many factors - my latest trials lead me back to the conclusion that - leoparding cannot be achieved without a WFO OR without an oven that provides 'heat in all directions'.

It looks as though I have 2 options:
1) buy the new oven and attempt a different style of pizza
2) take the plunge with a WFO

Please jump in - if you have any advise or can explain how I may be jumping to the wrong conclusion.

Thanks,

j



 

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