Author Topic: WFO heat balancing and related issues (split)  (Read 3253 times)

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Offline shuboyje

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Re: WFO heat balancing and related issues (split)
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2012, 09:06:53 PM »
I don't really think it "proved" anything, lol.  Maybe I misunderstood some of the comments from previous posts, but I was under the impression that you guys did not feel heat was transferring brick by brick via conduction in major quantities and instead felt the heat was transferring via radiation. 

I don't disagree in principal Jeff. My question is will enough heat move by that mechanism to matter? I can put a blowtorch on one end of a fire brick and hold my hand on the other for quite a while.
   

This quote basically hits at what I was testing.  Radiation alone brought the brick from ~50F to 180F(+130F).  Radiation + conduction brought the brick from ~50F to 400F(+350F).  Simple maths says conduction accounted for 220F as opposed to 130F for radiation.  The numbers themselves don't mean anything, but to me it does paint a picture that brick to brick conduction in the floor is feasible.

Now that I've hopefully somewhat explained my thought process I better get off the computer and on the phone to the Journal of Pizza and tell them to stop the presses pending further peer review, lol.  The things we do waiting to make more pizza.   
-Jeff


Offline TXCraig1

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    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: WFO heat balancing and related issues (split)
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2012, 09:53:52 PM »
I don't disagree that bricks conduct heat.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

scott123

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Re: WFO heat balancing and related issues (split)
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2012, 05:00:16 PM »
Jeff, I applaud your efforts. If you have any inclination to test this further (and I think you should), I'd really like to see a traditional fire on the side with a fairly active flame top licking flame for the test. It would also be nice if you could do the test near the end of the bake, just to make sure the super-heating of the center of the hearth during the initial fire isn't messing with the numbers. Lastly, could you take measurements of both the tops of the bricks and the fire facing sides?

Now that I've hopefully somewhat explained my thought process I better get off the computer and on the phone to the Journal of Pizza and tell them to stop the presses pending further peer review, lol.

You joke, but the real world ramifications of this information could be substantial. If conduction is the major player, then all these countless high dome oven owners could, in theory, place some sort of insulating layer (perlcrete) under their fires, go with larger, more aggressive fires and possibly end up with a more Neapolitan-ish top bottom heat ratio. This would most likely burn through a lot more wood, but... for a more Neapolitan-ish thermodynamic, I think it's a price many would be willing to pay.


 

pizzapan