Author Topic: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven  (Read 23220 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #50 on: February 12, 2013, 07:35:07 PM »
Is that snow on the edge of your table Bo?  ;D
Nice look'in pie man... :chef:
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scott123

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2013, 08:41:55 PM »
Very nice. I looks like this oven has enough top heat to bake a sub 2 minute pie.

John, my issue with this oven has, from the beginning, been about heat balance, not whether or not the top of the pizza can be baked in less than 2 minutes. Between the tall dome and lack of thermal mass in it, the balance skews way too heavily towards the bottom.

Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #52 on: February 13, 2013, 07:27:13 AM »
Is that snow on the edge of your table Bo?  ;D
Nice look'in pie man... :chef:

Nahh ... luckily that's just the table cloth!!!!

Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #53 on: February 13, 2013, 09:01:23 AM »
John, my issue with this oven has, from the beginning, been about heat balance, not whether or not the top of the pizza can be baked in less than 2 minutes. Between the tall dome and lack of thermal mass in it, the balance skews way too heavily towards the bottom.

Scott, dude, you're moving the goal posts on me!!  :)  We've already established that a hard core VPN artisan will not be happy with this oven.  I, on the other hand, think it's a slick oven that makes great pizza and is a lot of fun to use.  I think it performs pretty well ... easily well enough for me.  I've made literally thousands of pizzas over the years using all manner of approaches and devices, including some actual hands on experience with a couple of brick ovens in Italy (I've described the context for this before).  The Millars oven is easily worth the $$ I spent on it, compared to using conventional ovens or grills.  Honestly, I also believe I will grow out of it eventually and will want to build an authentic oven.  In the meantime, this is a reasonable alternative in my view.  But honest people can disagree on things ... and it looks like you and I will have to agree to disagree.     

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2013, 10:01:47 AM »
That's a nice looking pie from what LITTLE I can see  :-D

You might give this a try next time: http://www.drpic.com/ and make the picture a little bigger. It will let you crop and re-size. I'd make the pictures at least 600px wide - they can be as much as 800px wide for uploading to pizzamaking.

I'd love to see pictures of the underside and crumb as well.

Craig
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Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #55 on: February 13, 2013, 10:34:08 AM »
That's a nice looking pie from what LITTLE I can see  :-D

I sent you the full-sized picture via e-mail

Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #56 on: April 29, 2013, 08:13:01 AM »
All

Here's a Pizza Margherita that I made on Saturday with the Millar's oven.  It was about Pizza #6 that evening.  Floor temp was 850.  Cook time was about one minute, 45 seconds.  It's a 12-inch pizza.  I didn't get a chance to take a picture of the bottom.  I'll try and remember to do that next time. 

I used crushed San Marzano tomatoes (spiced only with salt and basil) and some good quality, fresh cow's milk mozzarella.  The dough was my own cheater recipe for VPN pizza ... I used sifted bread flour, salt and low temp and IDY, fermented over about 10 hours in all.  When I made the dough balls, they each weighed about 13 ounces before slowly resting and raising for about 7 hours after the initial 3-hour fermentation.

Bottom line:  this was an excellent pizza ... I'm not sure where to get better, more authentic Pizza Margherita around here anyway.

Question to the group:  given the description above, what could I change that would give me better leoparding?  That's about the only thing missing, I think, in this pizza.

Botrojan 

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #57 on: April 29, 2013, 10:20:51 AM »

Question to the group:  given the description above, what could I change that would give me better leoparding?  That's about the only thing missing, I think, in this pizza.

Botrojan


BoTrojan,


I don't recall any other member on this forum expressing something I feel very strongly about after extensive testing: forget about leoparding. It is just a cosmetic artifact of the fermentation time/temp and heat. Depending on which sourdough culture I use and how I ferment it and how I bake it, I can easily produce a pizza with very little leoparding that has much better flavor and texture than one with picture-perfect leoparding.  More often than not, pizzas I bake that have pretty leopard spots are over-baked. I understand that visuals are an important part of food enjoyment, but IMHO, leoparding as a cue for quality is just an illusion. 

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #58 on: April 29, 2013, 10:26:41 AM »
Nice looking pie, Bo. I bet it did taste great. How big was it (diameter)? 13-14"? It's hard to tell from the picture. 13oz sounds like a lot of dough for an Neapolitan pie. That's about 34% more dough than I use for a 13" pie.

As for more leoparding, I'd suggest longer fermentation keeping everything else the same. This is just pure speculation from looking at the picture, but it appears that your dough is under under-fermented. The cornice closest to you looks a good bit smaller than the far side of the pie. Given the amount of dough you used, I would have expected a massive cornice all the way around.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #59 on: April 29, 2013, 10:36:29 AM »
Great feedback, both of you.  Much appreciated.

I made another pizza later in the evening with a dough that had fermented longer (it was left over, had been frozen and brought back to life over a couple of days) and the leoparding was better ... though it didn't taste any better.  Craig, I will try your suggestions.  By the way, the pizza was about 12-inch diameter and to be more precise, the dough balls were generally 12.7 to 12.8 ounces.  I keep forgetting that imprecise measures aren't best to use on this board  :D

Can either of you give me a link to a recipe on this forum for making great VPN dough with bread flour or something other than 00 flour ... that is, something cheaper and more readily accessible?

Bo

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #60 on: April 29, 2013, 10:49:28 AM »
Great feedback, both of you.  Much appreciated.

I made another pizza later in the evening with a dough that had fermented longer (it was left over, had been frozen and brought back to life over a couple of days) and the leoparding was better ... though it didn't taste any better.  Craig, I will try your suggestions.  By the way, the pizza was about 12-inch diameter and to be more precise, the dough balls were generally 12.7 to 12.8 ounces.  I keep forgetting that imprecise measures aren't best to use on this board  :D

Can either of you give me a link to a recipe on this forum for making great VPN dough with bread flour or something other than 00 flour ... that is, something cheaper and more readily accessible?

Bo

That is a lot of dough. Proportionately, and taking into account the cornice and base thickness, that's probably on the order of 30-45% more dough than you would typically see in a similarly sized NP.  Not that such is wrong or bad if that is what you like, but I think with more fermentation, you are going to see a very big increase in your cornice.

"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline BoTrojan

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #61 on: April 29, 2013, 02:39:15 PM »
Craig, do you have a favorite recipe for me (maybe a link to one here within the forum) ... and, as I said before ... one that uses more readily available flour than 00 or the like? 

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #62 on: April 29, 2013, 03:28:25 PM »
Craig, do you have a favorite recipe for me (maybe a link to one here within the forum) ... and, as I said before ... one that uses more readily available flour than 00 or the like?

I think you want to target 24 hour fermentation. I don't have a lot of experience with regular yeast, so you may need to experiment and tweak this some, but here is where I would start. Maybe someone else will comment if they can help fine tune this.

100% King Arthur AP flour (KAAP)
63% Ice cold water
2.5% salt
0.04% ADY or 0.03% IDY.

Dissolve the salt in the water (if using ADY, keep some out to warm and dissolve the yeast per the normal process) then add 3/4 of the flour and the IDY or dissolved ADY and mix well. Add the rest of the flour in large spoonfuls over the next 5 minutes or so mixing//kneading the whole time. When everything is incorporated, mix for a few more minutes until it's basically smooth. The dough will be ~75F or so when you take it out of the mixer. Let it rest on the counter for 15 minutes. Give it 5-6 stretch and folds until it gets firm and resists your stretching. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes then repeat the stretch and folds. Do this one or two more times until your dough is very smooth. Let it rest (covered with plastic) in bulk for 1.5 - 2 hours at 60-70F (depending on how long it took you to get it smooth) then ball and let ferment (covered with plastic) for 24 hours @ ~65F. You don't want to touch the balls again until you are ready to use them.

For the last 8 hours, keep an eye on it. Until you get the yeast and temperatures fine tuned, you might have to make adjustments to get ready on time. You might need to put it in the fridge or oven at ~95F for 30 minute intervals to slow things down or speed them up. You'll learn what it should look like when it's ready with experience, but to start, look for about 2X rise. A little more would be better than less.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Ali72289

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Re: Millar Stainless Steel Pizza Oven
« Reply #63 on: April 29, 2014, 12:05:22 AM »
Does anyone know anything about the new f5? It seems to have fixed some of the design issues of the previous models and the price isn't bad at all.