Author Topic: Weird white spots on my deep dish doughball?  (Read 6388 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23568
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Weird white spots on my deep dish doughball?
« Reply #25 on: April 10, 2012, 11:07:05 AM »
I have an all purpose sitting on the counter as we speak and it's spot free.

Nate,

Is the all-purpose dough before or after refrigerating?

BTW, are you using a scale?

Peter


Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2698
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: Weird white spots on my deep dish doughball?
« Reply #26 on: April 10, 2012, 11:56:08 AM »
Nate,

Is the all-purpose dough before or after refrigerating?

BTW, are you using a scale?

Peter


After refrigeration, yes using a scale.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23568
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Weird white spots on my deep dish doughball?
« Reply #27 on: April 10, 2012, 12:23:47 PM »
Nate,

So, it looks like you get the spotting problem only when using bread flour, either alone or as part of a blend. If that is correct, you might try increasing the hydration the next time you use bread flour in any form, and try to keep all of the preparation steps and times the same as when you have made the all-purpose flour versions. Another possibility is to try a different bread flour, such as the King Arthur bread flour, to see if the problem persists.

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1208
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Weird white spots on my deep dish doughball?
« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2012, 12:58:33 PM »
Phytonic;
What kind/type of yeast are you using? From the photo that you provided, it appears that the spots are all about the same size. If flour or fat were the culprit, I would expect to see a more random size pattern formed, but because of the uniformity maybe we need to be looking at the yeast, especially if it is ADY or IDY, and how it is added.
We make a VERY undermixed Chicago cracker type crust that resembles a pie dough rather than a pizza dough (just 45 to 60-seconds of mixing time) In this dough we see a lot of flour lumps but they have a very randon size distribution and they are hard when squeezed, and when broken, you can identify the flour, this is why I am leaning away from the flour in this case. However, it might be dried dough pieces from a surface that the dough was scraped off of at some point, just a thought.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

pizzapan