Author Topic: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.  (Read 30155 times)

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Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #60 on: May 28, 2012, 09:19:56 AM »
more pics..


Offline RobynB

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #61 on: May 28, 2012, 05:29:38 PM »
Those look like good eating!!  Topping on the last one?  Roasted sweet potato and ricotta?  Or ???

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #62 on: May 28, 2012, 08:12:57 PM »
Those look like good eating!!  Topping on the last one?  Roasted sweet potato and ricotta?  Or ???

Hi Robyn :)  Thank you. It was delicious.  It's butternut squash, a little bit of burrata, and buffalo mozzarella.  The butternut squash was baked on juices left from the roast chicken the the night before. 

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #63 on: June 11, 2012, 09:08:37 PM »
3 Margheritas from this past weekend.  38 hr room temperature fermentation using cake yeast.  59% hydration. 2.8% salt. Floor temps between 780F-830F.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #64 on: June 11, 2012, 11:20:07 PM »
Very nice. I've been served plenty of Margheritas in restaurants that don't come close to those!
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #65 on: June 12, 2012, 05:57:06 AM »
Very nice. I've been served plenty of Margheritas in restaurants that don't come close to those!


Thank you, Craig!

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #66 on: June 12, 2012, 04:18:26 PM »
Wow! Beautiful pizzas. I am on a vegetable only diet right now so they look extra good to me.  Well done! 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline Barry

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #67 on: June 13, 2012, 10:27:33 AM »
Hi fornographer,

Those pies look great. I can see from the last pic that you posted that you have a good "pick-up technique" to stretch the uncooked pizza on the peel.

Kind regards.

Barry in Cape Town

Offline Giggliato

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #68 on: June 13, 2012, 09:34:06 PM »
3 Margheritas from this past weekend.  38 hr room temperature fermentation using cake yeast.  59% hydration. 2.8% salt. Floor temps between 780F-830F.



what percent yeast? maybe around 0.2%? I like long room temp fermentations but I also like being able to store dough for long periods to grab bake?

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #69 on: June 13, 2012, 10:18:06 PM »
The only thing wrong with those 3 pizzas is the lack of bites taken from them....


Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #70 on: June 14, 2012, 06:20:45 AM »
Hehe.  Thanks all.  Giggliato, I couldn't measure the amount of cake yeast because it was too small to register on my scale.  The flour was around 500-600 grams I think and the cake yeast that I dissolved in the water was probably a little over half the size of a pepper corn. 

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #71 on: June 14, 2012, 04:19:19 PM »
Very nice. I've been served plenty of Margheritas in restaurants that don't come close to those!


Very much agreed.

And I can't bake a margherita as good looking as those in my current set-up, that's for damned sure.  :-[ ;)

"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #72 on: June 14, 2012, 04:27:07 PM »
I took the liberty of removing whoever's ugly arse foot was detracting from the beauty of this firey-hot looking woman!  :D
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #73 on: June 14, 2012, 04:32:49 PM »
Bravo!
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline The Gizz

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #74 on: June 15, 2012, 09:51:49 PM »
I took the liberty of removing whoever's ugly arse foot was detracting from the beauty of this firey-hot looking woman!  :D

LoL....Yeah, that big toe did kinda work its way into the spotlight of that beautiful peppery pie.
Thanks........Tee

Offline thezaman

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #75 on: June 17, 2012, 11:26:08 AM »
wow,that is excellent looking pizza.half of peppercorn,600 grams flour,36 hours bulk. got to try that.what does the bulk look like after the extended rise? double,triple,or more? I'm thinking you are at a 1/4 gram or less.you still are getting a lot of color so you must of hit the yeast level perfectly.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 11:31:41 AM by thezaman »

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #76 on: June 17, 2012, 03:09:05 PM »
wow,that is excellent looking pizza.half of peppercorn,600 grams flour,36 hours bulk. got to try that.what does the bulk look like after the extended rise? double,triple,or more? I'm thinking you are at a 1/4 gram or less.you still are getting a lot of color so you must of hit the yeast level perfectly.

Hi Larry.  It definitely doubled.  There were a lot of holes as I cut the dough for balling. I think the temperature of my kitchen ranged from 74F-78F while it was bulk fermenting.  I don't understand why cake yeast makes for a better crust.  I tried the same thing with IDY this weekend and got an entirely different crust--less creamier/sweeter flavor and bit tougher.  I thought they were the same species of yeast.




Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #77 on: June 17, 2012, 04:59:15 PM »
Quote from: fornographer link=topic=18632.msg192142#msg192142 date

I thought they were the same species of yeast.


They are the same species but not necessarily the same strain.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #78 on: August 12, 2012, 08:00:31 AM »
Since the last post, I've been trying out many things from the UPN clone to the Keste Clone. During that time, I also ditched my homemade sourdough starter for an Ischia starter.  That made a big difference,  my old starter would always make a very sour and gummy dough no matter how young the leaven or little of it I use.  I guess it was too acidic (I tried many different temperatures, hydration, etc).  The Ischia starter was INCREDIBLE.  On my first go, it produced astonishing, to me, pies.  The flavor was more complex than my old starter and just had a hint of sour.  The texture was as many on the forum described about Ischia pies:  very tender melt in your mouth, very thin crispy skin, very open crumb.   The leoparding was great also.  The oven also has gotten a lot better.  I baked at higher temperatures (940F-970F) and didn't burn the bottoms at all. The cake yeast based pies were equally if not more tender (even after they have cooled down).  However, they did not exhibit the same leoparding and did not have that thin, crispy crust. 

I think  I have settled down on 2 ways of making pies:

Cake Yeast:  58% hydration, 2.8% salt, peppercorn sized fresh yeast (I don't have a scale that can measure that small an amount), 24 hr bulk between 68F-74F, 8 hr balled between 68F-77F.

Ischia:  59% hydration, 3% salt, 1% Ischia, 24 hr bulk at 65F, 8 hr balled between 68-77F.



Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #79 on: August 12, 2012, 08:01:23 AM »
Pictures..


 

pizzapan