Author Topic: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.  (Read 40248 times)

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Offline thezaman

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #75 on: June 17, 2012, 11:26:08 AM »
wow,that is excellent looking pizza.half of peppercorn,600 grams flour,36 hours bulk. got to try that.what does the bulk look like after the extended rise? double,triple,or more? I'm thinking you are at a 1/4 gram or less.you still are getting a lot of color so you must of hit the yeast level perfectly.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2012, 11:31:41 AM by thezaman »


Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #76 on: June 17, 2012, 03:09:05 PM »
wow,that is excellent looking pizza.half of peppercorn,600 grams flour,36 hours bulk. got to try that.what does the bulk look like after the extended rise? double,triple,or more? I'm thinking you are at a 1/4 gram or less.you still are getting a lot of color so you must of hit the yeast level perfectly.

Hi Larry.  It definitely doubled.  There were a lot of holes as I cut the dough for balling. I think the temperature of my kitchen ranged from 74F-78F while it was bulk fermenting.  I don't understand why cake yeast makes for a better crust.  I tried the same thing with IDY this weekend and got an entirely different crust--less creamier/sweeter flavor and bit tougher.  I thought they were the same species of yeast.




Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #77 on: June 17, 2012, 04:59:15 PM »
Quote from: fornographer link=topic=18632.msg192142#msg192142 date

I thought they were the same species of yeast.


They are the same species but not necessarily the same strain.

CL
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Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #78 on: August 12, 2012, 08:00:31 AM »
Since the last post, I've been trying out many things from the UPN clone to the Keste Clone. During that time, I also ditched my homemade sourdough starter for an Ischia starter.  That made a big difference,  my old starter would always make a very sour and gummy dough no matter how young the leaven or little of it I use.  I guess it was too acidic (I tried many different temperatures, hydration, etc).  The Ischia starter was INCREDIBLE.  On my first go, it produced astonishing, to me, pies.  The flavor was more complex than my old starter and just had a hint of sour.  The texture was as many on the forum described about Ischia pies:  very tender melt in your mouth, very thin crispy skin, very open crumb.   The leoparding was great also.  The oven also has gotten a lot better.  I baked at higher temperatures (940F-970F) and didn't burn the bottoms at all. The cake yeast based pies were equally if not more tender (even after they have cooled down).  However, they did not exhibit the same leoparding and did not have that thin, crispy crust. 

I think  I have settled down on 2 ways of making pies:

Cake Yeast:  58% hydration, 2.8% salt, peppercorn sized fresh yeast (I don't have a scale that can measure that small an amount), 24 hr bulk between 68F-74F, 8 hr balled between 68F-77F.

Ischia:  59% hydration, 3% salt, 1% Ischia, 24 hr bulk at 65F, 8 hr balled between 68-77F.



Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #79 on: August 12, 2012, 08:01:23 AM »
Pictures..

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #80 on: August 12, 2012, 08:01:47 AM »
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Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #84 on: August 12, 2012, 12:35:27 PM »
Looking really good! I love the Ischia Margherita and the  Ischia sausage and peppadew peppers.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Offline The Gizz

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #85 on: August 13, 2012, 01:14:46 AM »
Great looking pies Fornographer! If you had to choose one, which do you prefer? CY? or Ischia pies? One day I will order some Ischia but not sure if I care for the sour taste. I tried a breadtopia sourdough starter and it was just to strong for my liking in a pizza crust.
Mind if I ask where you get your CY? RD?
« Last Edit: August 13, 2012, 01:17:51 AM by The Gizz »
Thanks........Tee

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #86 on: August 13, 2012, 06:14:32 PM »
Thanks Craig :)

@The Gizz.  Right now I prefer the flavor and texture of the room fermented CY.   However, I think there's a lot more potential for the Ischia and it might top the flavor of the CY in the future. The kids definitely prefer the "sweeter" taste of the CY pies.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #87 on: August 26, 2012, 07:20:40 AM »
This weekend's pies were all about TXCraig clones. 

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #89 on: August 26, 2012, 07:23:18 AM »
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Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #90 on: August 26, 2012, 07:50:43 AM »
This one is a totally different recipe.  Fermented for nine months. 


Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #91 on: August 26, 2012, 08:46:37 AM »
This one is a totally different recipe.  Fermented for nine months. 



@ exactly 98.6F - perfect and way better looking than any of your pies.  :-D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #92 on: August 26, 2012, 08:49:47 AM »
Seriously, the pies all look great too. How did you like the mushrooms on the Margherita? That is an insanely beautiful pie.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #93 on: August 26, 2012, 08:51:43 AM »
This one is a totally different recipe.  Fermented for nine months. 



Beautiful picture.
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Offline thezaman

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #94 on: August 30, 2012, 12:26:52 AM »
so you are a cake yeast proponent , i have not had a natural risen pizza yet so i cannot compare. your pies are things of beauty and you are cloning craigs pies perfectly.i think that the little oven from forno bravo primevera 70 and your andiamo have great dimensions and they cook really good pizzas. your pies have come along way very quickly.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 12:31:01 AM by thezaman »

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #95 on: August 30, 2012, 05:40:09 AM »
@Craig.  Thanks :)  

@TheZaman.  Thanks :)  This last bake with the Ischia starter shifted my opinion to neutral between the CY and Ischia.  The Ischia pies from last weekend were as tender and easy to digest as the CY pies.  They also had that thin crispy crust that Craig has been describing on his pies.  The color and leoparding was better.   When I reheated the leftovers a few days later, the crust came alive as if they had just come out of the oven..just like the CY pies.  I like the slightly tart flavor but I can tell kids and some folks prefer the sweeter and wheaty flavor of CY pies.  I initially started with my own starter but it produced pies that were too sour and tough (at the beginning of this thread)  when using a similar workflow.  I thought I'd try buying an Ischia just for the heck of it and I'm glad I did.  I didn't think that natural leaven can vary that much in performance.  Maybe for large parties, I will stick with CY as it will give me a larger room for error. For personal enjoyment and my weekend bakes with a few friends, I'll use the Craig's workflow from now on.  

I'm quite surprised that the pies looked a tiny bit like the pies coming out of an Acunto.  However, managing the tiny oven to get it consistent was difficult when using standard size logs.  I had to cut them in significantly smaller pies of varying size so I can "throttle" the heat.  During the firing of the oven, after the logs have broken down into smaller pieces, I push them against the walls and let the floor even out and cool down a bit.  By the time I launch the first pie the walls are in the mid to upper 900s and the floor is in the upper 800 to lower 900.   While pies are cooking, I make sure that the flames are lapping across the dome.  In the past, I accomplished that by constantly adding regular size firewood logs. That ended up heating up the floor too much in between pies.  This weekend, I learned that I can achieve the same effect by just using smaller logs. I've been cutting the logs small but this weekend I tried cutting them smaller to roughly an inch and a half thick and 14 inches in length.  The flames would lap across the dome but the wood is just enough to cook 2-3 pies and the floor didn't overheat.  
« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 05:44:44 AM by fornographer »

Offline weemis

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #96 on: August 30, 2012, 03:34:15 PM »
This one is a totally different recipe.  Fermented for nine months.  



congratulations on a beautiful fermentation!
good luck!

your pies are rockin, too! i noticed similar things with wood size and heat. i get small scraps of kiln dried maple from a toy maker. hot as hell for like 4 minutes... perfect!
« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 03:36:24 PM by weemis »
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Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #97 on: November 18, 2012, 04:14:08 PM »
Last night's bake.  1 batch of sourdough and 1 batch of cake yeast pies. SD was fermented for 2 days. CY was for 1.5 days.  60% hydration.   I found a good deal on buffalo mozzarella at Costco.  It melted beautifully.   My wife was making crabcakes and I tried some on the pie.  It was delicious.  The flavor reminded me of crab rangoon.


Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #98 on: November 18, 2012, 04:14:34 PM »
more pics

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #99 on: November 18, 2012, 04:18:14 PM »
Great looking pies all. I've been wanting to try crab. Good to know it works.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage


 

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