Author Topic: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.  (Read 31902 times)

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Mal

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #120 on: March 29, 2013, 07:54:55 PM »
 :o :chef:
Dang! These are some of the very best pies I've seen anywhere on the internet. Kudos!


Offline csafranek

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #121 on: March 29, 2013, 08:04:45 PM »
Wow! Those look fantastic!!!! Great job!

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #122 on: March 29, 2013, 09:25:48 PM »
They all look great, however, this one is verging on perfection. The look of the cheese, sauce, and crust are right there.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #123 on: March 30, 2013, 04:25:50 PM »
Thanks all :) 

The crust was still tender when I took it out of the fridge for breakfast this morning.  So, I guess not developing the gluten too much was the key.  I love the puffy soft crust. The pies were so light that eating them felt more like inhaling them.  I ate an entire pie and still felt like I had space for more. 

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #124 on: March 31, 2013, 03:58:48 PM »
First pies of the season. . . .

Dear Fornographer, great results! What was the floor temperature when you baked the pizzas? Thank you for the beautiful pizzas. Good day!

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #125 on: March 31, 2013, 06:01:17 PM »
Hi Omid, thank you.  When I launched the pies, the floor registered around 950F-960F.  The dome was off the scale and the walls of the oven were in the low 900s.  The fire was rolling aggressively--basically the dome was covered with fire all the way to the other wall.   The pies baked in 50 seconds.   

After reading the discussion in the other thread about forno bravo floors (and other non-authentic neapolitan ovens) being too recalcitrant with heat delivery, I decided not to soak the oven up too much.   How was I able to tell this?  The Andiamo 70 oven has what I think is a 2.5-3.5 inch floor.  Before, I would soak the oven until the bottom--when measured with the IR gun--underneath the oven would register between 130-150F.  This was too much retained heat and in a multi-pie session the floor would get too hot (1000F).   I would have to cook the pies on the peel.   This time around, the bottom was just 90F and never even reached 100F

I just heated up the oven for about 50 minutes, quickly raked the coal to the side, and then let the floor settle down to the low 800s.  I then put a small log or two, just enough so that I start getting a roaring fire.  I let the fire heat up the floor to the mid 900s before I launch the first test pie (a marinara).  It cooked in 50 seconds and after I took it out the floor registered in the upper 800s.  I quickly opened and dressed another pie.  That took almost a minute and by the time I was ready to launch, the floor was back in the mid 900s. 

Oh by the way, if you want to cool down a floor very quickly, I've been using a large cast iron pan, filled with little bit of water, covered it with aluminum foil, poked little holes on the foil, and then placed it in the oven right after cooking pies, and closing the door (and raking out the coals).   That absorbs a lot of the energy from the floor and steams up the oven nicely, while keeping the air temp hot, and making perfect for baking Tartine-style sourdough bread.  It took about a little under 2 hours to send a floor from 800s to the mid 500s.


Offline csafranek

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #126 on: March 31, 2013, 10:05:16 PM »
Great info! Thank you!
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 10:07:20 PM by csafranek »

Offline f.montoya

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #127 on: April 07, 2013, 06:54:05 AM »
Wow! I just read and enjoyed all seven pages. Beautiful pictures of beautiful pies! Your first pies were excellent but your latest creations are off the charts!!

Thanks for sharing, Fornography. I have a party coming up this weekend(Sunday the 14th). Your last pics are the gold standard I'll be shooting for! :D

Offline MadCityJim

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #128 on: May 25, 2013, 01:20:44 PM »
Thanks for the great thread. I'm in the process of curing my own red Andiamo 70 today. I feel like you've given me the ultimate illustrated owner's manual!

Thanks,
Jim

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #129 on: September 14, 2013, 09:00:48 PM »
Good ending to a beautiful day in Atlanta. 



Fermentation Length: 1 hr bulk.  19 hrs balled
Hydration:  58%
Salt: 2.7%
Cake Yeast.  Just a speck about 3/4 of a peppercorn size-wise.


Hand mixed. Fermented at room temp (74F in kitchen). Usual hydration is 60% but backed down to 58% because I was unsure when we would return to the house after spending the day around town.





Offline MightyPizzaOven

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #130 on: September 14, 2013, 09:15:47 PM »
Beautiful pies...
Bert,

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #131 on: September 14, 2013, 10:04:00 PM »
That's up there with the finest Margheritas I've ever seen.

Bake time?
Pizza is not bread.

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #132 on: September 14, 2013, 10:04:56 PM »
I absolutely love the look of the sauce. Please tell me about it.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #133 on: September 14, 2013, 10:06:41 PM »
That's up there with the finest Margheritas I've ever seen.

Bake time?
   thanks Craig. The pies tonight were baking between 30 to 40 seconds.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #134 on: September 14, 2013, 10:11:48 PM »
I absolutely love the look of the sauce. Please tell me about it.
The brand is called La Squisita. I just ran it through my manual food mill. Nothing added. Its very similar to the cento that you use and only a tad sweeter.

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #135 on: September 14, 2013, 10:24:56 PM »
Bravo!
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Danapointpizzaman

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #136 on: September 15, 2013, 06:10:01 PM »
Hi there Fornogaphy, great information, are you till enjoying your oven, I noticed your postings seemed to be April 2012.

Cheers

Danapointpizzaman

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #137 on: September 15, 2013, 06:18:16 PM »
Hi there Fornogaphy, great information, are you till enjoying your oven, I noticed your postings seemed to be April 2012.

Cheers

Danapointpizzaman


Newest posts are from yesterday and you'll see my progress over the year and a half since that time.  Yes, I am still thoroughly enjoying my oven. It is much more enjoyable now that I have learned how to use it.  The learning curve, to me, was quite steep and it was very frustrating in the beginning. 


Also consider the four grand mere ovens ([size=78%]http://www.breadstoneovens.com/[/size]).  I would have probably chosen them had I known about them when I was making a decision back in the 2011-2012 time frame.


Still, best hobby I've ever picked up. 

Offline Danapointpizzaman

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #138 on: September 15, 2013, 08:56:02 PM »
Man your pies look fantastic!

Now I am really excited, thank you for sharing your journey.

Congrats Fornography


Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #139 on: September 18, 2013, 10:30:24 AM »
Indeed very, very nice looking pies  :chef:

Thank you for sharing all that, very inspiring.

Antoine
WFO cooking is about passion.


 

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