Author Topic: Cracking the Giordano's formulation  (Read 2172 times)

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Offline pythonic

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Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« on: April 11, 2012, 05:40:39 PM »
Had giordanos again last night and it was devine.  I counted 4 individual layers in the crust and that's not counting the bottom or the thin one on the top.  Is it possible they are almost using a crossaint like dough?  It's on the drier side so that's the only thing I can really compare it too.  I've read through every giordanos thread and nobody has made such a layered pie or has got the flavor right.  Is just the sheeter alone responsible for all those layers?  Giordanos is my favorite pizza in Chicago so I'm hoping someone with great knowledge can chime in.

Nathan
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.


Offline Garvey

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2012, 08:09:02 PM »
I'm guessing the sheeter is doing that.  IMO, Giordano's is a very, very bland crust. A croissant is usually about 60-70% butter (bakers %).  I'd peg Giordano's to be in the 17% range or so. 

It's funny you mention it though, because I kind of had the same thought about HRI.  It is flaky and delicious (whereas the supposed HRI clone on this board is just dense...crumb is wrong, flavor wrong, etc.).  I am stumped about how that is achieved.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2012, 08:22:06 PM by Garvey »

Offline pythonic

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2012, 08:18:06 PM »
I'm guessing the sheeter is doing that.  IMO, Giordano's is a very, very bland crust.

I wouldn't say bland.  It has a very different and unique flavor to it.  Is it possible to duplicate what a sheeter does manually?
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline David Deas

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2012, 08:19:51 PM »
No.  Not unless you're a beast with the rolling pin.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2012, 08:25:48 PM »
I edited my last post, but seeing the activity, I'll just post newly here...

I had Giordano's stuffed and thin about a year ago, and they presumably use the same dough for both.  The stuffed is so, um, stuffed with goodness that (IMO) the crust is just a vehicle.  The thin proved that: it tasted as dry and bland as matzoh to me.

I'm not slamming your tastes or the like: I only bring it up to say it's not a butter- (or oil-) fest like a croissant but something much lighter.

Offline pythonic

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2012, 09:24:23 PM »
Yes I know that giordanos is much drier than a crossaint, I was just comparing the layers really.  But I have to wonder if they are folding something into the dough.  The flavor of the crust, cheese and sauce go perfectly together.  I wish Petezza could actually try a slice because he's only has pics and nutritional data to go by.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline David Deas

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2012, 09:27:02 PM »
Yes.  Chicago style pizza is rare even in Chicago.  I'm lucky to have a Nancy's close by.

Offline BBH

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2012, 09:31:30 PM »
Getting the layer is tough without a sheeter, with a sheeter it's very easy...

What you have to do is roll it out thin, very thin using a roller or sheeter.  A very light coat of flour on top and bottom proceed to fold in half, fold in half again.  You now have 4 layers.  You can fold again if you like ( I do ) then reball being careful by folding the edges down and in, keeping the folds in tact. Cook on a stone, at 475 .  The bottom layer most of the time will split and appears as 2.  

You need to dock the dough very well, and also, par bake really makes these crusts crispy, but do not think they par bake.

BBH

Offline BBH

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2012, 09:34:41 PM »
Yes.  Chicago style pizza is rare even in Chicago.  I'm lucky to have a Nancy's close by.

No doubt, very few places actually do it...most people don't like it so places don't bother.  Shame.  I can only think of 1 place in my area, and thats Gullivers....

Funny how the Chicago Style is what the city is known for but most places don't serve it....


BBH


Offline PizzaAnyWay

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Re: Cracking the Giordano's formulation
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2013, 11:29:41 AM »
I realize this is an older thread but I have an answer.  I am also a fan of Giordano's and there is a place near me that serves a pie very similar to theirs.  Pizza Papalis was born in Detroit and they serve a "stuffed" pizza that is divine!  I watched them use the sheeter but instead of folding the dough and running it back through they stacked 2 smaller balls on one another and then ran it through, giving it the separate layers.


 

pizzapan