Author Topic: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce  (Read 4409 times)

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Offline TomN

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Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« on: April 14, 2012, 07:05:23 PM »
While i continue to experiment with beer in my pizza dough, i am pretty happy with it at this point. However, i am not completely where i want to be with my pizza Sauce. My choice for the best complete pizza sauce is Pizzaiolo by Stanislaus. I usually pour it right onto my pizza as is. At times i will add fresh diced Garlic or basil. My question to those that use this sauce is: What do you add to it? Any suggestions or just stay with it as is???
Thank you.

TomN

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11739414&search=pizzaiolo&topnav=bdoff&Mo=0&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Browse=1&N=5000045&whse=BD_767&Dx=mode%20matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BD_767&Ne=4000000&D=pizzaiolo&Ntt=pizzaiolo&No=0&Nty=1&Nr=P_CatalogName:BD_767&Ntx=mode%20matchallpartial
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 02:08:29 AM by TomN »


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2012, 11:25:43 PM »
When I bought a can of Pizzaiolo several years ago, I thought it was pretty nasty. It tasted like snack bar sauce to me, and I ended up dumping almost all of it. I think the whole point of Pizzaiolo is that it's ready to use and you don't add anything to it, which I suppose is great if you operate a snack bar at a bowling alley or swimming pool, where customers expect snack-bar quality pizza. But if you're trying to make something that tastes better than snack bar pizza, you need to get rid of the Pizzaiolo.

If you want a good sauce, start with good tomato product. San Marzanos without anything added to them make amazing sauce. I've also found that Cento crushed tomatoes make a great base for sauce. I've even made decent sauce out of tomato paste.

Just keep it simple. Add some basil at first and see how you like it. If you add more than a few spices or flavors, you're just making it unnecessarily complicated. And never cook sauce. That's the easiest way to ruin good tomato product.

Offline TomN

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2012, 01:16:19 AM »
Not sure how you came to that conclusion?  I am wondering if you are confusing Pizzaiolo by Stanislaus with some other brand that you had SEVERAL years ago?????

Pizzaiolo is made by Stanislaus, who is well know for their sauces. I have visited MANY pizzerias and I see Pizzaiolo labels very often. It is not always the main sauce, but I OFTEN see the cans in the kitchens of many Pizzerias. Some who mix it with other sauces, etc..   IMO it is a high end sauce, like all the Stanislaus products.

 i was just wondering if anyone adds other ingredients to enhance the flavor even more? Sorry to hear that it was such a disappointment for you. However, I thank you for the ending comments about pizza sauces.

http://www.stanislausfoodproducts.com/products/real-italian-products

« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 02:13:29 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 02:23:58 AM by TomN »

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2012, 08:45:01 AM »
Tom,

I have never tried Pizzaiolo sauce by Stanislaus, but I do use all Stanislaus products at my small market stand.  If you are interested in what I added to my Stanislaus products, or do now add to them, the one post is at Reply 2 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9744.msg85554.html#msg85554  Now I just microwave the crushed garlic and dried herbs in olive oil, add a little Kosher salt, a little sugar, a few crushed pepper flakes, a little dried Italian mixed herbs, a little dried oregano and some Parmesan cheese.  I think if you taste test your additions of anything to your Pizzaiolo sauce, you might be able to then know if you like the additions.  Usually my sauce with additions sits for a day to blend the flavors.

Norma
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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2012, 08:58:22 AM »
TomN

I know from past threads that you are a big fan of the Pizzaioli sauce, a product I had intentions of trying, but all of a sudden I have not been able to get it. A large local grocery chain (Price Chopper) uses the Pizzaioli sauce on there in store prepared pizzas. I'm a big fan of top quality crushed tomatoes for my sauces, which I usually season conservatively with some combo including basil, oregano and garlic and not much else. I have never been very big on San Marzano's or for that matter any whole tomatoes until I discovered the tomatoes that a favorite Italian restaurant was using for there pasta sauce, that being Stanislaus' Alta Cucinas.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2012, 02:02:41 PM »
Tom, the New York sauce you linked to looks good. Notice that it's a very simple sauce, made from a higher quality product than Pizzaiolo. (Since you made me look around on the Stanislaus web site, I find myself dying to try the 7/11s.)

Keep in mind that just because Pizzaiolo is a Stanislaus product, that doesn't mean it's a high-end product. Yes, Stanislaus produces a lot of products that many people consider high-end, but Stanislaus also produces snack-bar quality products (their Ready-to-Serve line) for people who don't know anything about pizza but want to be able to serve pizza; for people who want something easy, without much regard for quality. That's Pizzaiolo.

So no, I'm not confusing Pizzaiolo with some other brand. I'm not gonna forget the name of something that stood out as exceptionally gross, especially when it has a memorable name like Pizzaiolo (partly because it makes sense to remember what I don't want to buy again). I thought Pizzaiolo was gross, just like I think Taco Bell is gross. Do you think I'm confusing Taco Bell with some other brand? Like Chipotle, maybe?

I've made a conscious effort to get away from using San Marzanos for a couple reasons (even though I love them) because:
1) They're expensive;
2) They're very labor-intensive (draining the excess water and processing);
3) Anything you have to drain is wasted money because a) it yields less product than something you don't have to drain, and b) you have to pay for the shipment of water you don't need;
4) I'm always trying to learn how to make better-tasting pizza with lesser-quality ingredients. (It's easy to make awesome pizza with awesome ingredients.)

Maybe a few other reasons, too.

One of my goals when I make pizza is to find the most efficient ways of doing everything, but without sacrificing quality. I want to own/operate a pizzeria someday, and I've seen over and over how inefficiency is one of the major killers of independent pizzerias. Inefficiency creates a need for extra labor, which costs money. Inefficiency also makes customers have to wait longer for their food, which makes customers never come back (which costs money). So inefficiency equates to higher labor costs and fewer customers. Not good.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2012, 02:53:26 PM »
TomN, I know you specified that you would like to know what folks are adding to the Stanilaus Pizzaiolo sauce so I will apologize ahead of time for the additional opinions of my post.   ::)

The pizzaiolo sauce is made to be used from the can as is, but it doesn't mean you can't doctor it up.  I do that all the time.  It basically comes down to taste.  To improve upon the pizzaiolo sauce for me, I usually add in a bit of sugar to sweeten it and a good amount of black pepper.  But that's just how I like my sauce for NY pizza, slightly sweet and peppery.  

Now that aside, I will agree with everyone in saying that Stanislaus makes some excellent tomato products but IMO not all of their products are of the same calibre.  They may all be quality products, but tastewise the Pizzaiolo is not one of my favorites.  I have tried almost all of their products, and for my taste the pizzaiolo sauce is near the bottom compare to their other products.  I have a can of their Full red marinara sauce to experiment on pizza next.

Their Alta Cucinas are excellent and so are the 7/11's and Tomato magic.   The saporito and super dulce are thick and sweet and do require thinning down with just water or a thinner tomatoe sauce.  These 2 would make for a decent base sauce to which you can add the spices you like.  

Having gone through 2 of the BIG cans of Pizzaiolo sauce, I don't believe I will be buying anymore.   For my taste, I like to start off with just plain tomatoes and add spices to my taste.  I also like to spice it and use it fairly quickly.  I am not a fan of day old sauce.  I know others like it when the flavors meld together, but for me that has never work.  

Chau
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 03:08:38 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2012, 03:05:42 PM »
Tom, the New York sauce you linked to looks good. Notice that it's a very simple sauce, made from a higher quality product than Pizzaiolo. (Since you made me look around on the Stanislaus web site, I find myself dying to try the 7/11s.)

Keep in mind that just because Pizzaiolo is a Stanislaus product, that doesn't mean it's a high-end product. Yes, Stanislaus produces a lot of products that many people consider high-end, but Stanislaus also produces snack-bar quality products (their Ready-to-Serve line) for people who don't know anything about pizza but want to be able to serve pizza; for people who want something easy, without much regard for quality. That's Pizzaiolo.

So no, I'm not confusing Pizzaiolo with some other brand. I'm not gonna forget the name of something that stood out as exceptionally gross, especially when it has a memorable name like Pizzaiolo (partly because it makes sense to remember what I don't want to buy again). I thought Pizzaiolo was gross, just like I think Taco Bell is gross. Do you think I'm confusing Taco Bell with some other brand? Like Chipotle, maybe?

I've made a conscious effort to get away from using San Marzanos for a couple reasons (even though I love them) because:
1) They're expensive;
2) They're very labor-intensive (draining the excess water and processing);
3) Anything you have to drain is wasted money because a) it yields less product than something you don't have to drain, and b) you have to pay for the shipment of water you don't need;
4) I'm always trying to learn how to make better-tasting pizza with lesser-quality ingredients. (It's easy to make awesome pizza with awesome ingredients.)

Maybe a few other reasons, too.

One of my goals when I make pizza is to find the most efficient ways of doing everything, but without sacrificing quality. I want to own/operate a pizzeria someday, and I've seen over and over how inefficiency is one of the major killers of independent pizzerias. Inefficiency creates a need for extra labor, which costs money. Inefficiency also makes customers have to wait longer for their food, which makes customers never come back (which costs money). So inefficiency equates to higher labor costs and fewer customers. Not good.

Nice post Ryan.  I will agree that Pizzaiolo Sauce isn't great, but I'm not going to say it's gross.  You can doctor it up to make it taste better, but it might be better than some store bought jarred pizza sauce.  There's a lot of gross stuff on the shelves, and pizzaiolo isn't quite that bad, but I do understand that you don't like it.   But for anyone that likes Pizzaiolo sauce, I wouldn't fault them either.  I'd gladly use it if that was all I had access to. 

I do agree with your reasons as to why you don't buy SMs.   Of the 5-6 brands that I have tried over the last couple of years, I've yet to find one that I thought was impressive enough to warrent the $5 per 28oz price tag.   Especially when you can buy Stanislaus Alta Cucinas at under $5 for 4x that amount, if they are available in your area.   If you can find Alta cucinas and haven't tried them yet, then I highly recommend them.  You might have to drain them a big according to your taste, but it doesn't have to be wasted either.   If I have to drain off any liquids from whole peeled tomatoes and there is enough of it, I will usually pour it over ice and make a refreshing glass of tomato juice. 

Some other really great whole peeled tomatoes that I like using and find just as good and sometimes better than canned SM tomatoes are organic whole peeled tomatoes.  I have tried 3 various different brands from my local grocery store and for the price, I have been pleased so far. 

Chau

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2012, 04:29:26 PM »
I've touched on it a few times recently in other threads, but this seems like a great place to bring it up.  My local costco recently began carrying Flora Foods DOP San Marzano's 3 28 oz. cans for $8.  I've been through my first three cans and these may be my favorite store bought tomatoes yet, the flavor is great and they are not excessively watery once drained and crushed.  I'll be stocking up for sure to hold me over until this years tomato harvest is here.

I recently tried the Alta Cucina's and although I loved the price I won't be going back to them anytime soon.  I found the flavor pretty decent, but once drained and crushed they were excessively watery, easily the thinnest of any tomato I've used to date.  Was my can a fluke? 
-Jeff


Offline chickenparm

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2012, 04:58:16 PM »
I have not tried that so I cannot comment on it.I do want to add,just about every ready to go pizza sauce I have tried have all been lousy,or marginal at best.2 other brands I tried were supposed to be "Award Winning" in the taste test.I had to throw them out.I tasted them straight out of the can.Yuck they were.

Whats interesting is that since I have been coming to this forum,after trying so many different tomato products and spending alot of money,in the end,I came back to conclude the most basic sauce using crushed tomatoes is simply the best way for me to go.

Im currently using classico ground/and or crushed tomatoes and they taste amazing straight out of the can.I dont even have to add anything to it at times,Usually,I just strain some of the water out of it,and use it the tomatoes for a sauce.When the pizza comes out of the oven,I sprinkle oregano and some garlic powder over the top of the pie.Thats it.

The thing about the classico cans,its usually easy to get at any walmart or food store that carries them.
(I am not talking about the jar sauces either,I dont care for those.Only the canned tomatoes)

I also love the 7/11's and 6 in 1's for making a sauce.Those are harder to get and have to be mail ordered which is a down side for many of us.

I will say I sometimes cook a clove or 2 of fresh garlic in Olive oil and add that to my crushed tomatoes before use.Depends on my mood.Bottom line,experimentation is the key.Try products and narrow down what you like.

I did so many and I suck at making sauces.Yet the most basic sauce has given me the best tasting pies in a long time.

 :)









-Bill

Offline Giggliato

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2012, 02:18:40 PM »
I've touched on it a few times recently in other threads, but this seems like a great place to bring it up.  My local costco recently began carrying Flora Foods DOP San Marzano's 3 28 oz. cans for $8.  I've been through my first three cans and these may be my favorite store bought tomatoes yet, the flavor is great and they are not excessively watery once drained and crushed.  I'll be stocking up for sure to hold me over until this years tomato harvest is here.

I recently tried the Alta Cucina's and although I loved the price I won't be going back to them anytime soon.  I found the flavor pretty decent, but once drained and crushed they were excessively watery, easily the thinnest of any tomato I've used to date.  Was my can a fluke? 

I've tried some of those DOP cans and it seems like there is a lot less tomatoes in them than the cans from a local producer. The tomatoes did taste pretty good, but they are pricey.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2012, 02:43:32 PM »
TomN;
One of my personal favorites is to use the 74/40 tomato filets from Stanislaus. Just drain them and apply just as they are. Prior to application of the tomato filets I like to add a very light application of garlic infused olive oil, then add a smattering of diced garlic, followed by several fresh basil leaves, after that, the tomato filets. I don't go for complete coverage, but rather something closer to 60%, then add your favorite cheese or cheese blend (mine id Mozzarella and Parmesan), then finish by dressing to the order. This provides a great natural, fresh tomato taste along with some texture that sauce doesn't provide.
My other personal favorite is to use slices of fresh, whole ripe tomato to replace the tomato filets. Leave the skin on the tomato for the extra flavor they bring to the pizza. No dried herbs please. Either of these makes a truly outstanding "sauce" if you like fresh tomato flavor and texture.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline SinoChef

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Re: Pizzaiolo Pizza Sauce
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 04:35:32 AM »


Hi TomN,

This post By November helped me out quite a bit.

Quote
The technique, known in the industrial chemical engineering world as Microwave-Assisted Extraction


Starts at reply #4.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=8c3d4bf1faebdc797634dabe98fafa01&topic=3735.0



 

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