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Offline weaverpizza

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Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« on: September 13, 2005, 10:40:06 AM »
Hi all,

I have a dough recipe that I really like that includes 2T sugar and 1 to 2 eggs with 3 cups high flour, etc etc.

Could someone give some input on what the consequences are (from experience hopefully) of adding egg products to dough? Whites, yolks or whole.

I think I used to have my recipe perfected but lately I just get too much browning and not enough of a crisp crust.

The taste is rich and wonderful.

I am very interested in knowing what occurs in the dough as more or less white, yolk, and water are added to the dough. I think I have a handle on the sugar aspect but that could be helpful too.

Thanks to anyone in advance.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2005, 08:53:41 PM by weaverpizza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2005, 11:47:57 AM »
weaverpizza,

I have not personally used eggs in pizza dough, but I have read a fair amount on the subject. And from what I have read, egg whites help improve the crispiness of the crust but using whole eggs can result in a less crispy crust, presumably because the crust can brown up (because of the eggs, and sugar as well) before the crust gives up enough moisture to become crispy. You might find the information from the links below of interest. You will note that in a professional setting, there is great concern about using eggs because of health/cross-contamination issues. Of course, this should not be a concern for you in a home setting.

In your case, I think there are competing forces at work. You want both nice browning and crispiness. Both whole eggs and sugar will promote browning but the browning can occur too fast--before the crust has had a chance to crisp up. Using only egg whites and reducing the amount of sugar may help. Using a lower oven temperature and a longer bake time may also help since it will allow the crust to bake longer and give up more moisture (the increased denaturing of the protein in the flour will also result in better flavor, much like in a slow-baked artisan bread). You didn't indicate how you are baking the pizza (e.g., pan, screen, stone/tiles, etc.), so there may be some opportunities there also to achieve the results you are looking for.

Some typical amounts of fresh egg whites and eggs to use based on my reading are 2-4% of egg whites (by weight of flour) and 5% for whole eggs (to produce a noticeable flavor impact in the crust). Remember also that since whole eggs are around 85% water, it will usually be a good idea to reduce the amount of water in your formulation slightly to compensate for the water in the eggs.

Here are the links I mentioned above:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,608.msg5650.html#msg5650
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,202.msg1394.html#msg1394
http://www.pmq.com/mag/2004september_october/lehmann.php (see the question re eggs)

Peter
« Last Edit: September 13, 2005, 12:10:45 PM by Pete-zza »

piroshok

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2005, 05:50:38 PM »
Egg acts as emulsifier and it is usually added to recipes as reinforcer of weaker flour dough
If you do have high protein flour there is no need for eggs.

Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2005, 09:32:51 PM »
Peter,  Thank you for the reply and links.  I will further research.

Ricardo, Thank you too for the reply.

I have an existing perfected crust recipe which I have fed 100s in my home that people rave about the taste.  It uses 2 whole eggs and less water (of course) to compensate.  Ricardo is right in that I used to use the eggs with all purpose flour but then I switched to high gluten.  I like the nature of it much better.

However, I cannot get the puffiness up and yet the crust brown.  Back in my formative recipes to my current I would sometimes only use an egg white.  I may have to try that again and experiment.

My quest lately has been to get a crisper crust because I like the dough taste but it has not crunch.

My bake regimen has been to parbake at 485 an 18" for 3 minutes to get a nice oven spring and then pull out top.  Back in for 4.5 minutes.  both of these steps on a dark anodized aluminum pan.  Then pull the pan out and toast the bottom for another 1.5-2 minutes on the rack.

Reducing oven temperature....  Hmmmm   I may do that to see what happens.

I have several screens and used them Monday night to do some testing using a recipe from Jim Nair for "New Pizza".  I also have the American Pie book--quite excellent reading.  Comprehensive.

I think my issue is the right combo of egg components and amount of water.  The rich (and nutritious) flavor of the dough with egg really is great.  People even eat the the back crust edges.

I will research and read all the links you provided.

Thank you so much again and for your prompt help.

Mike

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2005, 10:04:56 PM »
Mike,

Would it be possible for you to post the entire recipe along with your processing methodology? It sounds like an intriguing recipe.

I was also wondering whether you can try baking your pizza on a screen rather than a pan. Or possibly a combination of a screen and a preheated pizza stone. Of course, the screen would have to be 18 inches, but the stone can be smaller if you start with the screen and bake the pizza until the crust sets and then shift the pizza from the screen onto the stone (or put the screen with the pizza on it on the stone). You can also use tiles in lieu of a stone. The particular approach would depend on what characteristics you are trying to achieve.

In your first post above you indicated that you were getting "too much browning and not enough of a crisp crust". In your last post you indicated that you "cannot get the puffiness up and yet the crust brown". Maybe it's my interpretation of your words, but perhaps you can clarify by stating what you have been getting versus what you would like to get. If you have any photos of your pizzas that would be useful also. Once we get the entire picture of what you are doing we might be able to offer up some concrete suggestions that will get you to your desired destination.

Peter

Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2005, 10:52:13 PM »
Well stated Peter.

In that last post, I meant 'get the crust puffy and the crust crisp' on the bottom.  I did not mean 'brown'.  With the sugar and the egg content, I do not have a problem with browning.

This is the recipe that I began with long ago.  http://www.correllconcepts.com/Encyclopizza/05_Dough-making/06_dough_recipe.htm

Then I went to a high gluten flour and have experimented with 1-2 eggs instead of only one egg yolk.  In this recipe, I would use one yolk in the combination with 3 cups high gluten flour, etc.

When you say methodology, do you mean soup to nuts or more detail on my baking steps?

Mike

EDIT (2/1/2013): For an alternative Correll link, see http://web.archive.org/web/20040606221443/http://correllconcepts.com/Encyclopizza/05_Dough-making/_05_dough-making.htm
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 01:47:16 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2005, 11:25:06 PM »
Mike,

I originally meant the dough processing steps but I can tell from the recipe you linked me to what those steps would typically be. I wondered, however, whether the dough is refrigerated before using. Since you indicate that you have been using 3 cups of flour, I assume that you are using the 16 oz. (flour) test batch recipe and using the entire amount of dough to make an 18-inch pizza. Is that correct?

Finally, what kinds of toppings (cheese, etc.) are you using, and are they lightly or heavily applied?

Peter
« Last Edit: September 13, 2005, 11:32:23 PM by Pete-zza »

piroshok

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2005, 05:37:32 AM »
As i reasoned wasn't far off the mark as the recipe you pointed out says Medium-gluten Flour
an egg would make all the difference as emulsifier and the medium gluten flour will develop a crust no problem for a home oven
High gluten flour are not really designed for home oven they are more suitable for commercial high heat ovens
 

Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2005, 08:19:17 AM »
Peter,

A glimpse on my processing.  My typical processing is to create the dough and then use it within 3-4 hours fresh.  This works well but I have also refrigerated the dough 24 hours as Dominick suggests to get more flavor.  That works well too.  To get the oven spring the way I like it, I have typically parbaked the dough for 3 minutes.  Thus I roll the dough out on a lightly sprayed 18" pan with a 4" roller.  Then let the dough rise on the pan up to 20 minutes then bake the crust to get a wonderful oven spring for 3 minutes on a medium shelf in the oven(used to go 4).  Then I pull the pizza out and top it.  It goes back in on the pan for 4-5 minutes until is starts to turn brown.   Then I use a pan tool to pull the pan from underneath the pizza out and leave the pizza to 'toast' for a bit.

Someone else here on another thread that I participated in suggested bringing the pizza out and letting it cool a bit before the last toast.  I think this may make a difference.

A sideline, if either of you do not have a toaster oven, get one!!  This is the best and only ways to warm pizza.  It is great; simply toast the slice and it is crisp on bottom and hot.  It heats from top and bottom and gets up to 550 to 650 inside.  I checked mine with a thermometer and on 2nd and 3rd immediate toasts, it gets very hot.


I have plenty of unglazed quarry tiles and have tried them.  Even got my oven up to 650 inside because of the tiles shielding the heat from the top before everything gets hot.

I think that screens might be part of the answer without the mess of cornmeal.  American Pie suggests using screens at the very top of the oven.  My cheese gets done so fast though.

I still come back to the dark anodized aluminum pans that I have from pizzatools.com.  They work great and I like them very much.  Easy to roll out on too.  I have 9-18" pans.  Yes, I have fed up to 45 at our home at one time.


Ricardo,

Thank you for your comment.  Interesting.  I used to use the medium gluten flour and then I read Domenic DeAngelis book.  Interesting that I had three of the 'great' books from this page.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_books.html before finding this site.  I had the 'Great Chicago...',' The Art of Pizza...', and 'The Pizza Book'.  I now have 'American Pie' which is excellent as well.

Thus back to our story.  After I got Dominick's book, I began working with high gluten flour.  I liked the bite of the dough better.  But now that I think about it, it may not be as crisp on the bottom.

Ricardo, do you think the flour is the reason?  My home oven can go to 550 and I usually back at 485.  I did not change the temperature or times from medium gluten.  Interesting that medium gluten might make better in a home oven.  If you have any more comments on flour and egg white crisping, please elaborate.

I suppose one of my problems is that I have the yolk and the whites working against each other if I use whole eggs and at that up to 2 whole eggs in a recipe.

Hmmm.  I may need to experiment and report back.  Maybe I will begin with my old recipe again and go from there.

Oh BTW, sometimes (usually everytime) I open the oven to rotate.  Perhaps this is also an issue.  As heat loss is occuring.  Should I use tiles on the top to help retain heat.  If I put tiles in the bottom, then I will loose all the radiant heat.  I am not sure tiles are worth it at all.

Have I given the two of you enough to chew on.  ;)

Mike

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2005, 12:51:42 PM »
Mike,

I think it might be useful to analyze your situation by first looking at your basic Correll recipe. Sometimes a dough recipe will produce a crust whose characteristics (color, texture and flavor) are governed by the ingredients themselves and are not amenable to material modification in the oven during baking. When I look at the basic Correll recipe you referenced and see eggs, sugar, dried milk, water, salt, and oil, if I didn’t know better, and but for the high-protein flour, I would think I was looking at a yeasted cake recipe, not a pizza dough recipe. Maybe these ingredients will govern what you end up with more than any techniques you will use to bake the pizza.

Here’s the basic Correll recipe:

100%, Flour (medium-strength), 16 oz.
54%, Water (increase to 56-57% if high-gluten flour is used), 8.5 oz.
1%, ADY, 2 1/2 t. (Pete-zza note: 2 1/2 t. seems to be about 50% too high for ADY using the 1% figure)
8%, Sugar, 1.25 oz.
1%, Salt, 3/4 t.
4%, Non-fat dry milk, 0.625 oz.
2%, Egg yolk(s), 0.375 oz.
8%, Oil, 1.25 oz.

You indicated that you have been using two whole eggs and high-gluten flour. The high-gluten flour itself should provide better browning than a lower protein flour because of the higher levels of protein in high-gluten flour. According to Correll, if high-gluten flour is used, the hydration should be increased to 56-57%. This would increase the water content to 8.95-9.12 oz. As indicated in an earlier post, the amount of total water would then be reduced by the amount of water included in two eggs (versus egg yolks alone as specified in the recipe). I weighed two eggs (egg whites and yolks) this morning and got 3.1 oz (2 oz. for the egg whites and 1.10 oz. for the yolks). Since water constitutes about 85% of that weight, I estimate the final water weight to be around 6.5-6.7 oz. in the above recipe. Given that 56-57% is not particularly high for a high-gluten flour, you might consider raising the hydration to around 62-63% to produce a more porous dough and contribute to a more crispy crust.

The high levels of sugar (8%) and the use of non-fat dried milk (4%), along with the use of high-gluten flour as mentioned above, would ordinarily provide a substantial degree of crust browning all by themselves. However, using two whole eggs, which increases the baker’s percent for the eggs almost tenfold, from 2% to 19.4%, will mean even more browning. If anything, you may now be getting too much browning. And if the finished pizza browns too quickly, you might be inclined to take the pizza out of the oven before the crust burns. As a result, you may not get sufficient drying out of the crust to achieve the crispy condition you seek. Also, as previously noted in an earlier post, fresh eggs and crispiness do not go together particularly well.

I might also mention that high levels of sugar are often used in doughs with eggs to stabilize the eggs so that health issues (e.g., cross-contamination) don’t develop if the dough is kept at room temperature. Since the Correll recipe is one most likely intended for professional pizza operators rather than home pizza makers, I suspect that is the reason for the high sugar levels (more typical levels are 0-4%), since it is professional pizza operators who have to be concerned (because of regulations) about health issues like cross-contamination. In your case, I think you can safely eliminate a good part of the sugar in the Correll recipe. The eggs, dried milk powder and, to a degree, the high level of oil, should produce more than adequate browning, even for a same-day dough, and certainly for a retarded dough (because of the extraction of the natural sugars from the flours to contribute to finished crust browning).

Apart from browning concerns, the Correll recipe as you have modified it should produce a soft, sweet, and tender crust and crumb. This is because of the eggs (especially at 19.4%), the high levels of sugar (8%), the non-fat dried milk (4%), and particularly the high level of oil (8%). The low salt level (1%) will also serve to accelerate the rate and degree of fermentation, and with the relatively high level of yeast (at least 1% ADY), the dough should be able to rise pretty much without restriction and produce a good oven spring when used within a same-day or next-day time frame.

As I see it, unless you plan to change the recipe in some material way, especially as regards the use of eggs, sugar, water, etc., you may want to consider the following possibilities from the baking side: (1) Use a pizza screen, with or without par-baking the skin, and redeposit the par-baked/dressed pizza onto a 500-degree preheated pizza stone/tiles (the pizza can be baked at the middle oven rack position and the stone/tiles can be on the lowest oven rack position; (2) Bake the pizza on a screen, or on an oiled pan as you have been doing, remove it from the oven for about 10 minutes, and return the pizza to the oven for additional baking to (hopefully) crispen up the bottom of the crust; or (3) Use a lower bake temperature and a longer bake time, possibly in conjunction with the use of a pizza stone/tiles as mentioned above to achieve greater crust crisping.

Peter


Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2005, 03:20:46 PM »
Peter,

Your passion is evident.  I had to laugh at certain points as I read--thinking, this guy is taking my quest seriously!

Thank you for the time you invested in that last answer.

I forgot to mention that I have removed the non fat dry milk from the recipe because of some lactose intolerance in the family.

Your comments seem right on with regard to the difficulty of getting the crust to dry out fast enough to become crisp.  It is likely that I was getting a crisper crust before going to high gluten flour in the last 6 months (from all purpose) due to the HGF holding more moisture.  Certainly the eggs and oil is holding quite a bit of moisture in.

I think you the details you highlight are bring this clarity to my mind on the subject.

Also, I have found that the texture of the bottom of the crust can be related to dough preparation before going on the screen or pan.  If I take the dough out of the oiled bowl and place it right on the pan and roll, I get a different crust bottom (more porous) than if I take the risen dough and flour dust it before rolling.  Any wisdom here?

I think some test pizzas are in order next.  If I wish to keep the recipe as is, the 'toasting' effect may need to become the standard.

Mike

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2005, 04:35:21 PM »
Mike,

It was clear to me that you have a deep and abiding interest in the Correll pizza, so I applied a commensurate degree of seriousness to your questions :). I, too, was laughing, wondering how to put a crust on the outside of a piece of soft cake. And I couldn't get one of my favorite Gary Larson Far Side cartoons out of my mind. The one where a couple of polar bears are standing outside an igloo with an Eskimo inside, and one of the polar bears turns to the other and says something like "Yum. One of my favorites. Soft on the inside and crunchy on the outside." :)

As for your question on dough shaping, the only time I use a rolling pin is to roll out doughs for thin-crust or certain deep-dish doughs. Otherwise, I use hand shaping and stretching. I wondered whether you considered hand forming but didn't comment on it since I couldn't see a nexus between the way the dough is shaped and the character of the crust from the standpoint of crispiness. However, if you use hand shaping and strive to get the dough thinner in the center than near the edges, you might get a slightly different bake and degree of crispiness. Based on the original Correll recipe, I calculated a thickness factor of around 0.11 for an 18-inch pizza, which is equivalent to a medium thickness crust. You could use the baker's percents to scale the recipe down a bit to get a thinner crust, say, one with a thickness factor of around 0.10, which would be closer to a thin NY style crust. Another possibility is to make two smaller (diameter) pizzas and stretch them out a bit to get a thinner crust.

I hope you will keep us posted on the results of your experiments with the Correll recipe. It would be nice also to see some photos if you have the means to create and post them. I have put the Correll recipe on my pizza "to do" list. I will perhaps learn more from making the pizza than trying to deduce it from the recipe itself.

Peter

Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Dough recipe with egg -- Help, Please!
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2005, 07:57:08 PM »
Peter,

Even without the nonfat dry, the exact recipe from Correll is great.  Use the 2+t ADY too.  I have tried the hand stretch and forming.  However with the amount of ADY and the parbake, I can get great oven spring even from a rolled dough.  If I let it rise too much, this crust can get too thick.  Amazing what is possible with only 16oz of flour.

You correct in that it is a medium think pizza.   I have a spreadsheet to scale my recipe as desired but I like the thickness.  However I wanted get a crispy bottom.

Now for more laughing!  I like your soft cake analogy.  It makes me smile.  I don't really think it is a cake but the problem you so astutely portray is that the ingredients defy a crispy crust.  Nice portray on the polar bears.

This pizza is the *best* when it is refrigerated and then pieces put in the toaster oven.   Ah, nice tight heat from the top and bottom to crisp up the crust.  Too bad I cannot get the internal temperature up high enough then.

As I said I worked a recipe very similar to this, then I found his recipe and like the yolk add.  Then I went on to 1 and 2 eggs.  There is a richness to the dough with its fermentation flavor that is wonderful.

Realistically, I need to work the egg situation and see if I should only use whites only, whole or yolk and whether 0 to 2 eggs.

Your suggestion on the water content increase is appropriate.  I have been not compensating for the 15% solids enough in the dough.

If you use this I would encourage you to pull the pan for the last minutes.   I am using electric and I could consider searing it on the tiles but all I have done trying that is to burn the bottom.  That may be due to the browning substances.  The last minute then nicely browns the pizza bottom and it 'sprung' and cooked on the pan.

In Dominik DeAngelis book, his main dough recipe is nearly identical to Correll's except for the eggs and nonfat dry milk and a slight bit more ADY and sugar.  Correll and I think Tom Lehmann even say that more than 2-3% egg product is not recommended but they don't say to much why other than contamination issues.

Any wisdom on oven temperature.  Long ago in the beginning I tried everything from 375 to 550.  With these particular ingredients versus the traditional ingredients, the higher temperatures simply burn the dough, in my findings.

Oh thank you for your numbers in post #9.  I think I need to move to a bit more water add in my 2 egg version.  I was substituting 2.25 oz of water for one egg.  Mine are extra large.  On of my yolks is .75 oz.  If you try the correll recipe, use one whole yolk and change the water accordingly.

Pizza tomorrow night for supper!

Mike

Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2005, 11:51:28 AM »
Peter, (or anyone for that matter)

I know I should ask this in another forum but...

Do you think it would be advantageous to place quarry tiles in the top of the oven to help hold the heat when the door opens and closes?

Hmm probably not--might change the way the thermostat reacts.  Perhaps on the bottom on the floor, this would help recovery but not impact my thermostat or radiant heat.

Anyone?

Mike


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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2005, 12:05:51 PM »
Mike,

The question you pose comes up from time to time, and was covered quite thoroughly at the Pizza Oven Physics thread and elsewhere. However, Steve specifically addressed the issue you raise in the context of using tiles at upper and lower rack positions of an oven. I have cut and pasted a pertinent portion of one of his posts as follows:

The purpose of the top stone is to prevent temperature swings. When the door to the oven is opened and the pizza slid in, the oven temperature will drop 100F instantly, mostly from the top of the oven chamber. So, this alone puts the pizza at a disadvantage. The top stone will still be radiating heat and will help minimize the temperature swing.

Peter

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2005, 12:59:20 PM »
Thank you, Peter.

You are right and I have read that whole thread.  I should add to it because if you use that top stone it will shield the thermostat sensor which I did with tiles.  By the time the sensor got to 475,  and turned off, then tiles below were so hot the oven went to 640.  I think I will do a few tiles on the top scattered out and several on the bottom as well.

I will go reread it again.

Stay well.

Mike

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2005, 10:10:39 AM »
Peter,

I made 4 x 18" pizzas yesterday.

#1 -- exact recipe all purpose flour and 1 yolk
#2 -- same but high gluten
#3 -- used 2 whole eggs and reduced water by 85% of egg content with high gluten
#4 -- same

Oven temp 460; used dark anodized pans for all
I parbaked each crust 4 minutes then topped and returned for 5 minutes.  Then pulled each out for a rest for 4-5 minutes and then back in for a 1-2 minute 'toast' directly on the oven rack.  I did this for all except the last pizza which I did the parbake on a pan and the bake on a screen.  It was so perfect that I did not need to 'toast' it yet again.

I put tiles in the oven to help with constant temperature.  I put 5 below the element.  Two on each side and then 5 on the top like the diagram below.  I wanted full air flow and good temperature control with the thermostat.

X         X
     X
X         X

These are 3 pictures of my #4 pizza.  I have more of others if you wish to see them.

Comments or questions?

Mike

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2005, 10:59:55 AM »
Mike,

Thanks for sharing the photos with us. Your pizza crust has a nice combination of browning and a soft, light, open and airy crumb. It looks very tasty. I was a bit surprised by how light the crust turned out. I might have thought that there would have been more browning based on your previous comments.

How did this batch of pizzas compare with some of your other efforts (before the four pizzas you made yesterday)? And did all of the variations, including #4, have the crispiness you were looking for? Maybe you can elaborate on what you learned yesterday from your experiments, either for the better or for the worse--in terms of ingredient choices or baking methodologies.

Unless all your pizzas looked alike, it would be interesting to see photos of some of the other variations you tried, just for comparison purposes. I wonder also which one of the variations you made you made yesterday you liked the best. And why.

Peter

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2005, 04:42:11 PM »
Peter,

I think that more browning occurs if only a single bake is used.  I use the multi bake situation because it helps to not over brown and to not burn the cheese particularly.

I have been using this recipe that I developed over a year or so, I then found Correll's.  I added the egg to my own.  This gave a richess which was new.  For a long time I used all purpose flour and it does fine if properly baked.  Last night my first pizza with the all purpose flour was not parbaked enough.  The par bake helps to solidify the rise to.

My wife whom I started the pizza project 3 years ago for likes it medium thickness.  I always like a crunch on the bottom which takes finesse.  We used to like our pizza best when we took leftovers and put them in the toaster oven.  I am perfecting this same crunch right away.  The screen may be the key!

I hope to try some more tomorrow night.

Anyway...  Here are 3 more pictures of Pizza 1.  Because of the all purpose flour, it did not hold the rise properly.  Or perhaps it was over risen.  Regardless, it did not rise right.

The best pizza turned out from yesterday were Pizza 2 & 4.  They both used high gluten.  2 had 1 yolk and 4 had 2 eggs.  Both of these turned out the best because of baking, I think.  The 2 egg bottom even thought crisp was a bit thicker or had more mass in the crispiest section on the very bottom.

I may try the recipe without egg at all tomorrow night again.

Mike

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tasty dough recipe with egg...
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2005, 07:35:44 PM »
Mike,

I wondered whether any of the doughs you used were retarded in the refrigerator, as opposed to being used within a few hours after making. Also, are the crusts sweet?

I fully agree with you on the use of a toaster oven. However, I have discovered that not all pizza slices crisp up the same way. For example, Neapolitan-style pizzas based on Italian 00 flour don't for some reason, especially the ones that use a preferment for leavening the dough. My favorite pizza for reheating in a toaster oven is deep-dish. I had a couple of leftover slices tonight and they were magnificent--as good if not better than the original. I think it has something to do with the way the tomato and seasoning flavors get better after a few days in the refrigerator. The bottom crust crisps up nicely too in the toaster oven. In the case of deep-dish slices, I find it better to preheat them in the microwave for about 30 seconds a slice before putting them in the toaster oven. The combination works better than either the microwave or toaster oven alone.

Peter



 

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