Author Topic: Handling high hydration dough  (Read 255 times)

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Offline chrisf

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Handling high hydration dough
« on: September 10, 2014, 04:00:14 PM »
I made a pizza today with a preferment and 80% hydration. Mixed the dough this morning early and baked the pie early this afternoon. The starter was active. The problem I ran into was after putting the dough on the counter to open it. I got it to the size of the pan quickly but getting it into the pan destroyed much of the integrity of the structure. It stretched out too much as I draped it over my arm. It still worked  okay but I think it could have been a bit better.

I watched videos on how to handle these types of dough but it was difficult. Can I open the dough in the pan?

Flour was CM Type 85 high extraction, baked in a convection oven at 425 for 20 minutes.


Offline Giggliato

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2014, 07:51:55 PM »
That piece looks alright to me. It resembles a focaccia which is usually placed gently into the pan, allowed to relax for a few minute or more depending on your proofing schedule and then gently eased into the pans edges.

Offline chrisf

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2014, 12:12:17 PM »
Thanks Giggliato,

Parts of it were good but when I tried to get it into the pan parts of the dough stretched out so far and became too thin while other parts remained the right thickness. As I mentioned I've viewed videos on handling high hydration doughs but it was much more difficult than I imagined and so I've been thinking about using a different method by putting the dough ball in the pan and then opening it.

I'll try again later this week.


Online JD

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2014, 12:15:37 PM »
What pizza are you trying to make? When I make NY Sicillian, I'll open it in the pan with some oil and let it proof for a couple hours.
Josh

Offline VarunS

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2014, 05:47:53 PM »
Pizza looks good  :)

Before draping it over your arm and laying it out onto the pan try & make sure the dough is as even as possible. This will make it much simpler once in the pan. Once in the pan start with one corner & pull from the thicker to thin spots while pressing against the edges to seal. If the dough is strong enough you should be able to pull it from underneath (thick to thin) as well. Handling the dough as little as possible is important.

This video should definitely help

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4u8bIf0-e1I" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4u8bIf0-e1I</a>

Offline jsaras

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2014, 07:00:47 PM »
What was the thing he said in that middle part?
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline chrisf

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2014, 07:59:56 PM »
Pizza looks good  :)

Before draping it over your arm and laying it out onto the pan try & make sure the dough is as even as possible. This will make it much simpler once in the pan. Once in the pan start with one corner & pull from the thicker to thin spots while pressing against the edges to seal. If the dough is strong enough you should be able to pull it from underneath (thick to thin) as well. Handling the dough as little as possible is important.

Ahh I see a difference in what I did and what he did. I put my arm exactly where he said not to.  :-[ Thanks, it was a big help.

Offline chrisf

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2014, 08:23:12 PM »
What was the thing he said in that middle part?

What time in the video? When he put the dough in the pan he said to take your arms out at the ends of the pan otherwise you will end up with a half moon shape dough if you pull them towards yourself. That was roughly the half-way point.

Offline VarunS

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2014, 02:46:23 AM »
If your oven can go upto 570 that would be an ideal temperature. Pan put directly on the stone/ base of the oven should help the crumb structure be more open.

Typically just sauce is applied & pizza is baked. Removed after 75% completion, topped with cheese & put back in the oven. Most likely has to do with excessive moisture all at once making the crust soggy / excessive browning of the cheese (on white pizzas this is not the case though).

Also if baking directly on the stone at higher temperatures poke a few holes into the pizza so that it does not balloon in the oven. This info is relevant to high hydration doughs pizza al taglio which some of the really good  Roman Pizzerias do. I would eat your pie all day erry day  ;D

How you close your dough with higher hydration which will eventually lead to a smoother opening process:
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEAWrrfUWRE&amp;list=PLv2tW2ocjvGydYiMzLWqUWCUfPTfpOPls" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEAWrrfUWRE&amp;list=PLv2tW2ocjvGydYiMzLWqUWCUfPTfpOPls</a>

Offline jsaras

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Re: Handling high hydration dough
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2014, 11:34:15 AM »
What time in the video?

All the stuff between "OK" and "OK".  It's all Greek to me ;-D
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.