Author Topic: First try at Sicilian  (Read 89 times)

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Offline GlobalTJB

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First try at Sicilian
« on: July 03, 2015, 08:34:32 PM »
Up until today, I had only made neapolitan pizza with a modified version of this recipe http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/001199.html which tasted pretty close to what my grandmother made growing up.  I added some ingredients to the dough to make it taste like I remember.  After a several year hiatus I logged back into the site and finally made my intro post and began reading up on Sicilian pizza specifically Norma's quest for Buddy's Detroit recipe. 

After seeing that a proper pan was needed and knowing that I don't like Aluminum or pans with coating, I wound up purchasing the Paderno World Cuisine 19 5/8" by 13 3/4" Blue Steel Baking Sheet from Amazon.com.  When I first got it, it had this nasty sticky coating on it, so I decided to wash it off with hot soapy water and season it.  A few weeks back, I had made a batch of lard form leftover fat from pork butts.  I heated up the oven to 450, put the pan in for a few minutes and smeared a layer of lard on it.  I lined the bottom cooking rack with commercial tin foil and put the pan in upside down for an hour.  Repeat this 6 times and I was comfortable that the pan would not stick.

With that out of the way, I knew I would have company today and decided to go with this recipe which I used the calculator to expand out to fit my slightly larger pan http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=21559.msg218034#msg218034.  Instead of instant yeast, I used active dry yeast.  I poured the water and yeast in the kitchenaid mixing bowl and let the yeast bloom for 15 min.  Afterwards, I added in 2T of olive oil and 1t of sugar and ran it in the mixer with dough hook fr about 8 minutes until the dough stopped sticking to the sides and climbed the hook.  I removed the dough from the hook, placed it in a oiled pyrex 4qt bowl and did a 2 day cold ferment in the fridge. 


1/2 hour prior to cooking the pie, I took the dough out and placed it in the baking sheet.  I picked 425 degrees at the baking temperature and after stretching the dough out, letting it rest 15 min and stretching it again, I put some sauce on it, and placed it in the oven for a 15 minute par-bake.

I checked on it after 10 minutes and noted that the crust started to cook nicely, didn't stick and the dough rose to a nice height. 

After another 5 minutes I pulled the dough and dressed it up for a 25 minute bake.  I topped it with 50/50 low moisture mozzarella and provolone cheese, home made sauce from uncooked crushed tomatoes and a mix of pepperoni and mushrooms.

After 15 minutes, I checked the pie and saw a bit more liquid than I would have liked, so I put it back in for another 8 minutes before adding a light layer of more 50/50 cheese.  After adding the cheese, I cooked it an additional 5 minutes and then pulled it, and let it rest while we ate our salads.

When I started cutting it into 12 slices, I was happy when the crust made a cracking sound but as I cut further, the pie was too mushy for my tastes.  My guests liked the pizza but that thin layer of uncooked/soggy dough disappointed me.

I give the pizza a 7 out of 10 but to make it a 10/10 I was thinking of changing the following variables:
-par-bake duration
-baking temperature
-removing the pie form the pan half way and finishing it on the fibrament stone
-make the sauce with whole canned cento tomatoes, pull them apart by hand, and use the reserved liquid elsewhere.


Any tips or advice is greatly appreciated.  The corner slices came out almost perfect but as you went to the middle edge pieces or the crustless ones the sogginess was readily apparent.

Here are some pics

After Par-baking/seasoning worked
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/661/7DrC7M.jpg)

Dressing the pie
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/673/XEpN8G.jpg)

a little more sauce
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/537/dUAH6v.jpg)

final cheese addition
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/537/KTU9Ys.jpg)

Cutting it in half so it fit on the cutting board.  Each half yielded 6 slices

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/905/CGCxua.jpg)

The bottom of the corner and the post cook pan after 6 coatings and a 7th from the oiled pie cooking on it

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/540/jcrZGQ.jpg)

Corner Slice Side Shot
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/537/s5481Z.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/913/ue4eLj.jpg)

Corner Slice Bottom after remembering to take a pic

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/661/0ZIvEz.jpg)



the exact recipe was

Flour 100% 520.4 g
Water 70% 364.28G
ADY .60369% 3.14g
Salt 2.2373% 11.64G
Sugar 1t
Olive Oil 2T





« Last Edit: July 03, 2015, 08:59:11 PM by GlobalTJB »


Offline GlobalTJB

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Re: First try at Sicilian
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2015, 08:40:06 PM »
I guess you can't embed images.

Offline norma427

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Re: First try at Sicilian
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2015, 11:27:25 PM »
GlobalTJB,

I reoriented your misoriented photos.

Peter and I have been asking members to use the photo test thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=33199.msg328718#msg328718 to test photos if in doubt as to whether they will show up properly on the forum. The forum's software cannot tell whether a photo is properly oriented.

For your additional information, members can fix misoriented photos themselves but it has to be done within one day of posting.

I could click on your links to your photos in your first post, but it isn't a good idea to embed photos because they can be lost from dead links sometimes.

Norma