Author Topic: Blind Baking Pizza Crust  (Read 2107 times)

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Offline Tatoosh

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Blind Baking Pizza Crust
« on: April 18, 2012, 10:10:22 PM »
I make pizza in a propane fueled home oven, on a pizza stone fabricated out of bricks and aluminum.  It works pretty well, but my maximum temperatures are in the 475F range.   I have been working on a crispy thin crust pizza that does not sog out when we add sauce and toppings.  We are fairly liberal with toppings, saucing first, then 10 ounces or so of cheese.  Other toppings such as meat or shrimp are to taste.  

I was having problems with the crust being a bit too soggy, so I took a couple of tricks from pie baking and started doing a pre-bake, the so called "blind bake" of a rolled out crust for 5 minutes in my oven heated to maximum.  The crust is removed and cooled.  Then it either was topped and finished (usually 8 minutes or so) or wrapped and frozen for future use.  This helped quite a bit and made it handy for pizzas on the fly since we already had crusts half done when we got the urge for a few slices.

The second trick was a light egg wash that I would put on after the crust came out from the blind bake. The egg was was usually just egg whites and a bit of water, so it didn't darken the pizza too much when it was finished, but a whole egg wash would work fine too.  It is brushed on lightly after the crust is soon as the crust comes out of the oven. The residual heat of the blind bake help set the egg wash which acts as a barrier to the sauce and toppings.  Pie bakers use variations of this trick to help protect pie crusts from sogging out from moist fillings.  It works pretty well for pizza too if you want to maintain the structure of your thin crust pizza.

I haven't made the transition to making pan pizza with even more toppings, but when I do, I expect to use this to help protect the crust from the layers of sauce, cheese, and grease from meat toppings.  

  
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 11:16:18 PM by Tatoosh »
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!


Offline David Deas

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Re: Blind Baking Pizza Crust
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2012, 11:40:15 PM »
475 degrees and likes a metric ton of toppings.

May I interest you in Chicago style?

Offline Tatoosh

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Re: Blind Baking Pizza Crust
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2012, 02:20:07 AM »
475 degrees and likes a metric ton of toppings.

May I interest you in Chicago style?

That is my wife's preference!  I was trying to overcome a soggy crust in my thin crust and lack of higher temps available with my oven.  But when we find a couple of pans for deep dish/Chicago style pizza, I will try these tricks out. 

While I'm uncertain about how feasible deep dish pizza on my Weber, I may give it a try.  Not with the Pizza Kettle insert I have coming for doing a psuedo wood-fired style pizza - thin crust (using a combo of charcoal and wood in the Weber charcoal BBQ), but running the Weber more traditionally with charcoal, grill grate and lid.  Luckily, I have a nice probe thermometer I will use to keep an eye on the grill surface and dome temperatures if I try this, since I hear that lifting the lid is oft the cause of pizza failure when doing grilled pizzas on a Weber BBQ. If all else fails, I'll make my wife happy with Chicago style from my kitchen oven, where I have better temp control. 

Time for me to spend some time perusing your Chicago style section and learn a bit more. 
Banana Ketchup Is Not Pizza Sauce - Weber 22.5 OTG, Smokenator 1000, Kettle Pizza Insert, White Mountain 6qt Elec, Cuisinart ICE-20 1.5qt, FMS 1500D sous vide - Mabuhay Pizza!