Author Topic: Pizza dough boxes  (Read 3533 times)

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Offline pooadrid

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Pizza dough boxes
« on: April 25, 2012, 11:27:46 PM »
The pizza restuarant i work in is starting to figure out ways to get dough into our walk in without taking too much space.

We have wrapped dough onto pans and wrapped with plastic wrap.
However each rack which takes up a square foot we have about 14 of them. Each rack hOlds 15 pans.

So we now have dough boxes to take up less room maximize our walk in cooler space, while maintaining a high amount of dough.

The two test boxes we have are the 26in by 18in?
The average sheet tray size :/

Well we do three different sizes of dough.

20oz i can fit 12 dough pieces in( these over proofed with the lid on back into one large piece and condensation)
14oz i can get about 15 pieces in a box( theoretically cuz i havent tested)
5oz i fit 28 pieces in...( they have proofed but not into one big piece)

Do i need to oil the boxes?

What is the best method for using these boxes? If i have multiple boxes do i need more than 1 lid? Or no lide just stack them and put a lid on only the top one.


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2012, 12:51:12 PM »
We have wrapped dough onto pans and wrapped with plastic wrap.
However each rack which takes up a square foot we have about 14 of them. Each rack hOlds 15 pans.
I've read this several times, and I still can't figure out what you're saying.

20oz i can fit 12 dough pieces in( these over proofed with the lid on back into one large piece and condensation)
You're putting 12 20-oz dough balls in a dough box and ending up with one large mass of overproofed dough? Is that what you're saying? Well, that's what I would expect to happen if you're putting that much dough in a box designed to hold half as much.

14oz i can get about 15 pieces in a box( theoretically cuz i havent tested)
5oz i fit 28 pieces in...( they have proofed but not into one big piece)
The fact that you use 5-oz dough balls suggests to me that you don't hand-stretch your dough--that you sheet it instead--and that the dough balls are not supposed to expand much. Is that accurate? If you expect someone to be able to help you, you need to include details. The reason no one else has responded yet is probably because no one knows what you're saying or what you're trying to figure out.

What is the best method for using these boxes? If i have multiple boxes do i need more than 1 lid? Or no lide just stack them and put a lid on only the top one.
It sounds like you need to cross-stack the boxes for a couple hours after you put the dough in the cooler, to let the dough cool quickly so it won't overferment and become one huge dough ball. Each box functions as a lid, so each stack should only require one lid. if you have more boxes than you need (and enough space), you can use boxes as lids.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2012, 12:53:11 PM by AimlessRyan »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2012, 02:53:38 PM »
POO;
With those dough boxes;
1) for any dough weight over 15-ounces, go with a 4 X 5 placement pattern; 14-ounce piece you can go with a 4 X 5 placement pattern and with a 5-ounce dough piece you can go with a 6 X 8 placement pattern.
2) Lightly oil the top of the dough balls after you place them into the box.
3) Immediately take the dough box to the cooler and cross stack them (90 degrees to each other) this allows for uniform cooling of the dough and prevents the condensation you are seeing. As the dough cool more efficiently, it also keeps the dough from growing together. Allow the dough boxes to remain cross stacked for 2.5-hours, then down stack and nest the boxes. And kiss them good night. The dough can be held in the cooler in this manner for up to three days.
4) To use the dough, remove a box of dough, leaving it covered, and allow it to temper AT room temperature for 2-hours, then begin opening the dough balls into pizza skins as needed. The dough will keep at room temperature for up to 3-hours.
This is a pretty standard method of dough management in the retail pizza industry. Just about everyone used some variation of it.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pooadrid

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2012, 01:30:02 AM »
Im sorry if it didnt make sense at what i was trying to accomplish.
We hand toss and stretch our dough.
The main goal was to figure out proper usage of these dough boxes in order to better utilize our walkin cooler.
We usually roll dough, place it onto an oiled pan, then plastic wrap it. Then place 15 of them onto a rack.

But with so many racks...we actually need the room for other items.were trying to effeciently and effectivly conserve space but maximize our dough count for the day.

I did what the dough dr reccomened.
I actually could only get 8. 20oz dough balls into a box. Set in rows 3x2x3.
Oiled the tops of them lightly...they proofed a little...BUT not merging into each other....
Even though they were touching they did NOT have to be ripped apart....

I also did another set the same way without oil with similar outcome.
These work excellent so far i made one dough into a pizza...seemed pretty good.
I will try them out in the morning and see if the results are een better


Thanks for your time :)

Offline PaperBoy

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2012, 01:03:06 PM »
This is the correct way of a Dough Box if you are hand stretching the dough. If you are sheeting it, it's a different story.

Pans save more space than dough boxes.
-PaperBoy

Offline pooadrid

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2012, 01:53:07 AM »
Whats the most youve fitted into a box?
I put 8 20oz dough balls into A box yesterday and had to stretch a little bit more or less( probably cuz i jist pulled from cooler and didnt let hit room temp).

Cooked pretty good like usual.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza dough boxes
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 09:03:30 AM »
Paperboy;
Those metal bench scrapers can be very hard on the plastic dough boxes, better to use the plastic scrapers. You can get rigid ones from WRH or you can get the cheap flexible ones from just about any flour distributor as they give them away with their name on them. Be kind to your dough boxes and they will last forever.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor