Author Topic: Tried a New York again  (Read 4762 times)

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Offline DKM

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Tried a New York again
« on: January 07, 2004, 10:34:35 AM »
I used the following recipe, which I may have got here.

1 pound high-gluten flour
9 fl oz warm water
1 tsp active dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp olive oil (not extra virgin)

I mixed it for 15 minutes.  Formed a ball and very lightly covered with oil put back in the mixing bowl, covered the top with plastic wrap and then a dish towel and let sit on my counter for about 4 1/2 to 5 hours.  Of course I meant to put in the refrigerator over night for tomorrow, but since I forgot what the heck I need something to eat tonight anyways.

When I went to make the pizzas I was surprised at how much the looked and handled like the dough I would see in the TV shows.  I divided it in half and make two approximately 15 -16 inch pizzas.  Of course the problem is my stone is only 12 inches and forgotten at home while the family and I are visiting Mom and Dad.  Well Mom has a old 16 inch cutter pan, so I had already heated the oven to 450 so a very light spry of non-stick spray and the dough goes on the pan topped with sauce sliced cheese and pepperoni and into the oven.

After about 5 minutes or so I can tell the pizza is getting done, but not browning.  So, on a whim I pull the pan out and slide the now firm crust on to the middle oven rack and close the door.  A few minutes later a nice, brown pizza is looking at me.  Slide it pack into the pan and slice.  Dang it was actually good.  So I made the second one the same way (well it was only cheese) and my wife declared that this was her new second favorite type of pizza, right behind my Chicago style crust.

Just goes to prove you never know what might make work out so try it.

DKM
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Offline Randy

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2004, 11:27:13 AM »
One of things I have not duplicated in my quest for the perfect pizza is warm, humid environment of a pizza shop.  I would think in your error you have compensated for that with a long rise.
Interesting!
 8)
Randy

Offline Steve

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2004, 12:01:01 PM »
I used the following recipe, which I may have got here.

1 pound high-gluten flour
9 fl oz warm water
1 tsp active dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp olive oil (not extra virgin)


Yes, that's my recipe. Glad it turned out for you!
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Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2004, 12:06:25 PM »
Steve, is the one you are currently using?

The family REALY like it.  I mean liked it so well it maybe come my standard recipe and prep style.

DKM
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Offline Steve

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2004, 12:09:59 PM »
One small note about that recipe...

I think it makes too much dough for one pizza crust. I started thinking about the pizzas that I saw them make on the "Pizza Wars" show... the NY style pizzas were stretched thin all the way to the outer edge, then it was puffy. My recipe makes so much dough that, when it's stretched, is thin only in the very center then slowly gets thicker at the edge.

I am going to try this recipe again, only divide it in half, and "work" the dough thin all the way to the very edge.

Am I making any sense here?   ;)
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Offline Steve

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2004, 12:11:39 PM »
Steve, is the one you are currently using?

Yes, that is my current "standard" NY style pizza dough recipe.

I use King Arthur "Sir Lancelot" high-gluten flour and Carapelli "mild" olive oil.
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Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2004, 12:43:47 PM »
Am I making any sense here?   ;)
A lot.

That's what I did.  I made two pizzas out of the single recipe.  At just under 16 inchs each they where pretty big for a 'home made' pizza.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2004, 12:44:50 PM by DKM »
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Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2004, 12:50:31 PM »
Randy,

Don't know if you deleted you earlier post or if I'm going crazy but here

http://community-2.webtv.net/D22R/MikeAndDotsRecipes/page4.html
« Last Edit: January 07, 2004, 02:02:21 PM by DKM »
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Offline Randy

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2004, 01:09:47 PM »
Thanks DKM.  Yes I deleted it.  I saw that you Steve had a nice thread going and my post didnít really fit.
Just looking at that recipe without the baking powder, it might be a Chicago pizza.

By the way I divided my NY dough in half also but I use a wetter dough.

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2004, 02:14:19 PM »
Since Steve brought up Pizza Wars:

I was watching my tape of it and that is what made decide to try one again.  I looked through my files and found Steve's recipe simply labeled New York Dough.

When I went to make the pizzas after my 'mistake' I noticed it looked just like the dough from the show.  It was very soft, but not really sticky.  Using a little bench flour I was able to flatten, stretch, and even do one toss into the air almost exactly like in the show.  It stretched very thin.  I'm waiting until the weekend to see if I can do it again making the same 'mistake'.  Maybe I can get some pictures if I can borrow a camera.

DKM
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Offline Randy

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2004, 02:23:59 PM »
Iím really happy with my New York style pizza.  I like a wetter dough than Steveís.  I just wish I could hit a balance with my Chicago pizza I had hoped the American Pie cookbook might help.  Now I have my doubts.

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2004, 03:11:30 PM »
Randy what is your current NY recipe?

I would love to compare it.

DKM
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Offline Randy

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2004, 03:28:55 PM »
The wetter dough will pick up more of the cornmeal flour mixture which I think is important to the taste of the crust touching the tongue.

I use the extra sugar and the honey to feed the yeast for a slow two-three day rise.

Randy

16 oz High Gluten Flour (Hard Red Spring Wheat)

9 Ĺ  oz Water by weight(warm 120-130 deg.  F)

2 TBS  raw sugar

2 TBS Honey

1 Tablespoon  Crisco

2  Teaspoon Salt

1 package SAF yeast

Put yeast and half the flour in the mixer.  Mix the sugar and honey into the hot water.  Pour mixture into bowl and place mixer on stir for about 2 minutes.  Add salt to remaining flour, add that to the bowl and leave mixer on stir until mixture pulls from the sides of the bowl.  Set mixer to knead and add Crisco.  Knead for 10-15 minutes.  If the dough is sticking to the bottom of the bowl add a tablespoon of flour or more until the dough barley releases from the bottom of the bowl.
Remove dough from bowl and divide in half for smaller pizzas and place in greased lightly covered bowl.  Refrigerate for two days.

Remove 2  hours before cooking.  Wet your hands and the marble and flatten each dough ball.  Reshape the ball with wet hands.  Leave covered for the two hours.
Preheat oven to 500 deg F  Mix together 50-50 mixture of flour and cornmeal.  Liberally coat the dough ball and marble with the mixture. Shape and place on pizza screen and add what you want.
Cook for 8 minutes.

Offline DKM

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2004, 04:35:24 PM »
Thanks.  I'll try and report back later.

DKM
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Offline Steve

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Re:Tried a New York again
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2004, 07:08:26 PM »
One of these days I'll update the recipes on the main website to reflect all the new stuff we've learned.  :-\
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