Author Topic: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO  (Read 19586 times)

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Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #100 on: September 05, 2012, 01:59:42 PM »
Thanks guys. I don't work at a lumber yard but the discount would help. Actually, I used wood because it was the cheapest material with an adequate wife aesthetic acceptance factor rating (WAAF), that I could use with confidence. The stand cost about $200 with fasteners, and the scrap from the 6 x 6s made a great chopping block to resplit the bigger oak splits. 


I like it....looks like a stone mountain.  8)
Thats funny, same thing occured to me. I also had a flash back to the close encounters mash potato scene.
Michael


Online Chicago Bob

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #101 on: September 05, 2012, 02:07:16 PM »
T

Thats funny, same thing occured to me. I also had a flash back to the close encounters mash potato scene.
Yep...I flashed to Mt. Rushmour!..... ;D
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Offline rcbaughn

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #102 on: September 07, 2012, 06:08:13 AM »
It's inspiring seeing this thing go from a on the ground mortarless oven to what it is now. I can't wait to see the concrete smoothed up with stucco on it. It's gonna be a great looking oven that just happens to bake well too, ha. Are you planning on painting the stucco or wood base when you get it all done? I bet a nice dark stain and glossy gym floor polyurethane on the wood would look unique. I'm partial to stucco painted lighter tans too.
More is better..... and too much is just right.

Offline sajata

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #103 on: September 07, 2012, 07:11:03 AM »
Thanks, I really like that word but rarely hear it used. I think we should come up with a pizza style for it or at a minimum a topping combination!

You should update your profile to include your location...

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #104 on: September 07, 2012, 09:12:44 AM »
Thanks, I am planning on using a dark brown transparent stain on the base. Still going back and forth on the final layer between stucco and bonding cement. Will probably go with stucco for extra breathability Tom mentions. I plan on tiniting the mix light brown.

It has rained here almost every day for the last week so I haven't been able to dry it. Had a break yesterday and lit a small fire. It is interesting the air flow inside the oven is different now that it is sealed. I am anxious to see how it performs with a full sized fire. I have had it with playing with kindling and the smoky start. I have not been helped by the high humidity and rain even though my wood is in a covered bin.  I'm buying a cactus burner this weekend >:D. BTW i'll have to snap a photo of my wood bin, its another roller coaster frame, I'm sure you guys will get a kick out of it.
Michael

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #105 on: September 09, 2012, 06:56:49 PM »
Well, pulled a real bonehead move today. As I mention I got a new load of wood and it is a little too moist so I bought a cactus burner, which btw are awesome. Unfortunately in the process I cracked my chimney and insulation over the opening  :'(.  It was the third fire since pouring the insulation and I though it had dried out pretty well. I suspect with a clay chimney one should probably never use a torch of that size. No substitute for well seasoned wood. I am going to have to build another wood shed so I can rotate deliveries and season myself for 1-2 years.  I dug through my wood pile and found some of the pieces from the previous load and forged ahead with more success. The insulation seems to be performing well. Had the oven at 700F for 3-4 hours and most of the shell is at about 95F, one spot hit 115F.  I plan on wrapping the remaining exposed chimney with some type of wire mesh and then putting a form around it, then filling it with a 1:3 perlcrete. Maybe that will protect it from getting worse. Anyone have any ideas?

Well, I baked a few NY style pies with the floor at 650F using my new favorite dough for this style. It is a 60% hydration KAAP dough cold fermented for 3 days this time. Made slightly larger than my usually pie which was one of my reasons for building the oven. These pies came out slightly oblong and average about 16 inches compared to my usual 14 inches. Used a 425g ball. One was plain the other salami. They bake in about 3 min.

Michael

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #106 on: September 09, 2012, 07:18:31 PM »
Wow! Looks like that dough is working rather nicely Michael. Congratulations on those pie's man, they beauties.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2012, 07:20:02 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #107 on: September 10, 2012, 11:29:15 AM »
Thanks Bob. :D
Michael

Offline RobynB

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #108 on: September 10, 2012, 01:41:47 PM »
Those are some beautiful BIG pies!  I'm impressed, you have skills to get them that pretty at that size.  I wish I could do that.  They look great!

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #109 on: September 10, 2012, 03:21:41 PM »
Thanks Robyn I'm sure you can, your kale pies look awesome!
Michael


Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #110 on: September 29, 2012, 01:50:11 PM »
Got back to trying to finish the oven today. As has been my usual experience I discovered that the next step was much harder than I imagined. I applied stucco today. I was able to get a scratch coat. A bit thicker than it is supposed to be, I think, but hopefully it will adhere and harden strong. The friable feel of the perlcrete has me concerned on the vertical surfaces that the whole thing is just going to let go at some point. I tried to form lathe around the oven the other day but that was a fiasco and I abandoned the idea. Just going to keep my fingers crossed. Will apply another coat in a day or three.
Michael

Offline rcbaughn

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #111 on: October 12, 2012, 09:43:42 PM »
Did you ever get the other coats put on the oven?
More is better..... and too much is just right.

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #112 on: October 12, 2012, 11:11:16 PM »
I got the last coat on a few days ago. Need to build another wood shed and uncover some dry wood. Probably wont fire it up for a few weeks.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 11:14:52 PM by Michael130207 »
Michael

Offline scott123

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #113 on: October 13, 2012, 05:51:27 AM »
Michael, I'm very excited to see what this can do.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2012, 08:27:40 AM by scott123 »

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #114 on: December 08, 2012, 05:29:57 PM »
Finally fired up the oven for the first time since putting on that final coat of stucco. Cracked like Humpty Dumpty, but I expected that. Only had it going for about 4 hours prior to bake. It could definitely have used a few more hours. There is a lot of mass to this oven. The dough is a 60% hydration, Caputo flour, 0.3% ADY, recipe that was put in fridge for 24 hours bulk, balled and put back in for another 18 hours, then 6 hr on counter.

The tool stand made things a lot easier to handle, it got the gold star of the day. Fire management still needs work, oven not quite hot enough for nice leoparding. I think the wood is still not quite dry enough but much better than 3 months ago.  All pies were 90 secs and very tasty. I will have to continue to work on increasing the heat and my dough making skills.
Michael

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #115 on: April 08, 2013, 02:47:02 PM »
Took a hiatus from the wfo for the winter as my wood was a little moist and it was cold out. Did a bake this past weekend. Refrigerated ADY  caputo 61% hydration dough. Preheated for about 3 hours as I was pressed for time. With the dry wood the oven was a lot easier to manage. I would have liked it a bit hotter. The pied shown is a lemon caper. Floor was in the high 700F. Looking forward to finding a weekend when I can preheat for a good 6- 8 hours pre bake. I am considering covering the oven in a layer of ceramic insulation and stucco to improve insulation and prevent cracking.
Michael

Offline Morgan

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #116 on: June 06, 2013, 07:33:54 AM »
Now thats a badass wfo :o Could you share some of your recent pictures of the oven and pies ?

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #117 on: June 06, 2013, 11:55:12 AM »
Thanks Morgan,

The oven looks largely the same, those pics are only a couple months old, I haven't made any changes. If there are pictures of any particular part of it you would like to see, just let me know and I will post them. I plan on doing a more detailed post of the build and follow up photos in the oven section in the future.  I have been very happy with its durability and cost to build. After 9 months I have observed no signs of corrosion or degradation anywhere. I keep it covered when not in use. Since my wood has now dried to an acceptable level it fires very nicely.

As far as pizza pics go the last ones I have posted are just about the best I have done lately. I haven't been baking enough to improve my skills.

The last time I baked a couple weeks ago for a group of 10, I over fired the oven, 8 h preheat, and couldn't get the floor temp down below 900+F for hours. The walls were in the 900's as well. Outside walls were about 100-120F. Neapolitan Caputo dough pizza bottoms got over charred within 15s before it even set up enough to lift and rotate. It was a bit frustrating but it encouraged me that it was well insulated and fired well with a small fire. chimney works great.  I am excited for my next bake where I will monitor the start up more closely.
Michael

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #118 on: June 06, 2013, 12:23:12 PM »
The last time I baked a couple weeks ago for a group of 10, I over fired the oven, 8 h preheat, and couldn't get the floor temp down below 900+F for hours. The walls were in the 900's as well. Outside walls were about 100-120F. Neapolitan Caputo dough pizza bottoms got over charred within 15s before it even set up enough to lift and rotate. It was a bit frustrating but it encouraged me that it was well insulated and fired well with a small fire. chimney works great.  I am excited for my next bake where I will monitor the start up more closely.

Your pizza's at the beginning of the thread look very good. Would you say all that hard work & money used to insulate & stucco was worth it (excluding cosmetic reasons)? Or looking back, was the mortarless, uninsulated oven enough to produce a Neapolitan style pizza so long as you fired for 6-8 hours?
Josh

Offline Michael130207

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Re: My first sourdough Nearlypolitan in my homemade WFO
« Reply #119 on: June 06, 2013, 01:43:15 PM »
My early pies were done with bread flour that browns at lower temps, thus so of those pictures may hide the lower temps achieved without insulation.

The insulation and stucco is definitely worth it for the following reasons.

a) the fuel use is dramatically lower insulated.
b) the exterior of an uninsulated oven is very high and would burn accidental brushers by, such as children, even many hours after using it.
c) while high temps could be reached uninsulated, is is very uneven, unstable, and requires a large fire.
d) insulating it wasn't very expensive. I believe the entire oven and stand could be done for under $1000.
e) The stucco protects the insulation but will crack if you build it without a compressible layer such as ceramic blanket. So plan on using a cover if you do it that way.

So to some up, uninsulated was fun for experimenting but if you are going to continue to use it you are much better off insulating it.  It was a lot of work but a ton of fun too :D.
Michael