Author Topic: Blackened DD pans  (Read 5599 times)

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Offline rcbaughn

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2012, 05:41:52 PM »
Well seasoned does not equal dirty. My dad would slap you right out the kitchen you hand him a dirty pan. I have 2 30yearold cast iron pans that my wife won't touch because she'll use soap. My pans are well protected by me, some say over protective. They are taken from use and are still quite hot and get scrubbed with hot water and a coating of lard before putting up NO SOAP, Too season a pan, several light coats of lard and trips to the oven. After several trips you have a small start. Mine are 30 years old and are just about right, black as tar and slippery as any high end superslickhi buck pan. And if needed, once in
 awhile, they get soap because they just got crappy but then it's an afternoon re-seasoning again. NO DIRTY pans in my house, used and seasoned proud of them and they ARE clean!!! Seasoned pans have NONO leftover food stuff in them, that's just nasty!!!

jon

My roommate took one of my smaller CI pans (One of my grandma's old ones that was gifted to me, the entire bottom has no bumps smooth as glass kinda old) and seared something in it and got a really thick coat of black carbon stuck to the bottom, so he proceeded to take a scrubber brush that you use for stainless pots and pats and scrub the inside with Dawn dish detergent. When I went to use my pan a few days later, the entire inside was the color of newly forged cast iron. Raw metal colored and almost shiny. Needless to say I was pissed beyond belief and now keep my pans in my bedroom closet believe it or not.

Being protective over that kind of stuff is definitely a good thing if you ask me because it hurts to see 30 years of seasoning get washed down the sink. Luckily I took the thing home and my grandpa re-seasoned it in the wood heater he uses in the winter, but it just isn't the same. It's less non stick than it was despite me using it a good bit since then.
More is better..... and too much is just right.


Offline Jackitup

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2012, 06:17:30 PM »
does the bottom side of the pan wear an imprint of the side of his head from when he got hit upside it??? :-D
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Offline rcbaughn

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2012, 06:53:40 PM »
He should have a Wagner imprinted in his dome for life huh? LOL.
More is better..... and too much is just right.

Offline djryan1194

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #23 on: October 11, 2012, 07:59:08 AM »
When I go back to Chicago, I always stop at Lou Malnati's.  I asked and they sold me one of their used pans for $15.  Best pan ever.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2012, 10:05:38 AM »
Here's a blog post I recently wrote about deep dish pans, accessories, and how to season deep dish pans. I think this post should be useful even to people who know their stuff in this department because I always try to thoroughly recap everything I do, then share honest results regarding how it worked out for me, as well as what I may have learned.

Even though I'm not a Chicago guy, I feel confident that what I've written is very reliable information (because I am an obsessive-compulsive analytical freak). Plus there are pictures that I think support what I've said in the post.

My main objective in starting the blog was to provide a source of pizzamaking instruction that's free of misinformation, since there's so much misinformation about pizza on the internet (especially regarding deep dish). If anyone disputes anything I've said in the blog post, I encourage you to call me out, either here or in a comment on my blog post.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2012, 10:07:21 AM by AimlessRyan »

Offline peetzabone

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2012, 04:38:16 PM »
I'm a n00b at DD pizza- having made true Chi style only 3 times... but I don't "get" the desire to season a pizza pan... my early attempts at DD made me wish the crust would cook slower, not faster (and I'm adjusting the oven temp to slow down so internal temp rises faster) but a dark pan would only make this worse. I use a "granite" colored springform and a metallic springform and I've had better luck with the lighter color. I've never had sticking issues (oiling with corn oil).

I'm open minded- if seasoning an aluminum or stainless pan somehow improves flavor or performance I'm all ears (or eyes). But from what I can intuit from history this wouldn't be a good use of time.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2012, 08:05:33 PM »
I had my Grandmothers CI frypan with 30+ years seasoning on.  Well, I did until my wife burned something in it and took it outside (because the contents were on fire) and threw it on our burnpile.  I didn't find it for a week or so, so it was rusted out and crudded up.

I left it in the burnpile and burned it, and spent a couple months seasoning it back up, it is good as new.  You can't kill them, you just have to use and clean them correctly.  I wash it with soap every time, FYI, but I also reheat it to wash and dry it and wipe it with oil each time too.  It is better than Teflon anyday.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2012, 09:45:30 AM »
Seasoned pans are nothing more than pans coated with oil and baked multiple times until the oil polymerizes, turning into a type of "varnish" and then turning dark/black with continued use. The thing to remember about seasoned pans is that they need to be washed in a special manner. Here's how we recommend washing a seasoned pan: Hold pan in one hand and soft plastic bristly scrub brush in the other hand, dip pan in soapy water and scrub gently, immediately followed by a rinse dip, immediately followed by a sanitizing dip, set the scrubbing brush aside and pick up a clean towel and thoroughly dry the pan (NOTE: The pan has NEVER left your hand up to this point) Now place the pan in an oven to force dry for a couple minutes. Failure to follow this procedure may result in the seasoning peeling off of the pan like a bad sunburn, allowing you the honor of stripping all the remaining finish from the pan and starting all over again...Ugh!
The dark colored anodized finish pans, on the other hand can be soaked in hot soapy water for a few minutes to help soften any debris adhering on the pan, but the truth id the matter is that this is seldom an issue as in most cases you can just wipe off and adhering matter. Why wash in the first place? 1) All pans should be washed to remove any residual oil before being put into extended storage. This is for sanitation purposes, and it will also prevent the pans from going rancid due to the residual oil in the pan. 2) Some place require that all pans used in a commercial food establishment be washed daily, in this case the non-stick, pre-seasoned pans are a no-brainer. 3) If you serve a pizza while in the pan, the pan MUST be washed and sanitized before it can be reused (restaurant application).
Lastly, have you seen those commercials for non-stick cookware where the guy fries cheese in a frying pan, then just lifts it out? The commercial non-stick finish on some of the pizza pans is just that good.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline rondo

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2012, 10:50:58 AM »
Late to the posting, but I bought 2 -  9 1/2 inch Padermo blue steel cake pans ( referenced in another post, which I cannot find) and seasoned them and they work very nicely for deep dish.

http://www.amazon.com/Paderno-World-Cuisine-Inch-Steel/dp/B003DZ1JZE/?tag=pizzamaking-20

peace
The first pizza I ever made was Chef Boyardee pizza in a box. That was many, many slices ago and I remember thinking it was fabulous.

Offline peetzabone

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #29 on: January 01, 2013, 04:21:50 PM »
Seasoned pans are nothing more than pans coated with oil and baked multiple times until the oil polymerizes, turning into a type of "varnish" and then turning dark/black with continued use.

I appreciated the post Tom but it still doesn't answer my question... if we have a choice between "seasoned and dark" versus "virgin and light" I'm still of the opinion that the latter is better all other things considered equal.. as it slows down the crust browning. What am I missing- does the seasoning somehow improve flavor or release? Or are you simply saying that with continued use there's no way NOT to darken your pans?



Online TXCraig1

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #30 on: January 01, 2013, 04:39:03 PM »
I appreciated the post Tom but it still doesn't answer my question... if we have a choice between "seasoned and dark" versus "virgin and light" I'm still of the opinion that the latter is better all other things considered equal.. as it slows down the crust browning. What am I missing- does the seasoning somehow improve flavor or release? Or are you simply saying that with continued use there's no way NOT to darken your pans?



The seasoning will not directly affect the flavor (the dark color may speed browning of the crust which would in turn affect flavor). Seasoning should improve the release. That and rust protection are the main reasons to season iron/steel pans. Your pans will darken over time, but if you wash them thoroughly after use, it should not be meaningful with respect to performance.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Blackened DD pans
« Reply #31 on: January 01, 2013, 09:10:30 PM »
peet,
This is what I use and they are perfect.
Never "seasoned" mine. Just greased it up for my first pie and into the oven it went. Good company to buy from too.
Bob

http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com/american-metalcraft/hc900915/p521045.aspx
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