Author Topic: cold water technique--worked  (Read 2477 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline canadave

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 663
  • Age: 42
  • Location: Beach Meadows, NS, Canada, Earth
cold water technique--worked
« on: July 09, 2004, 05:30:01 PM »
Hey there folks,

I tried something the other night to make my NY style pizza dough...it worked great!  Tasted the best of any dough I've made yet; speaking as a native NY-er, it was pretty authentic-tasting.

I basically used Steve's recipe: 2 pounds high-gluten flour, 20 ounces water, 2 tsp yeast, 2 tsp salt, 2 tsp sugar, 2 Tbs mild olive oil.  The one big difference from how I did things before?  I used cold water.  I'd estimate the temperature to be at around 45-55 degrees F.  

Dissolved the sugar into the water, poured the water into the flour/salt mix, turned on the mixer to low, then added the yeast and oil.  Mixed on low for 5 minutes, then turned the mixer off, then mixed for another 5 minutes.

Here's another change I made--I used metal cookie tins instead of plastic grocery bags, to store the dough.  Placed the dough in the tins, put the tins in the fridge, waited overnight.  Result--delicious!!! :)  Dough was pliable, manageable, rose well.  Simple, easy, fantastic.

--Dave


Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2039
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 06:59:30 PM »
I've never tried using cold water before so I went with this 8yr old formulation and made dough tonight.  I'm sure there are better updated ones out there but this was all I could find.  I'll be baking tomorrow and the day after so I will be sure to post some pics.

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline jsaras

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 515
  • Location: Northridge, CA
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2012, 12:27:35 AM »
Were you using ADY or IDY?
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2039
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2012, 12:29:55 PM »
IDY
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline weemis

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 567
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Columbus, OH
    • My Pizza Web Blog
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2012, 01:32:03 PM »
You can use ADY with cold water as well. Just hold back 100g or so for ADY hot water activation.
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 963
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2012, 02:59:04 PM »
When we mix dough in a large planetary Hobart mixer (80-quart) using 50-pounds of flour, we typically need to use water at 60 to 65F to achieve a targeted finished dough temperature of 80 to 85F after about 10-minutes of mixing. The cold water is needed to compensate for the temperature gain of the dough during mixing as a result of friction between the dough and the bowl. This is pretty common in pizzerias across the country, but when making pizza at home, with much smaller mixers, the temperature gain is not all that great, plus our expectations of the dough are different between store made and home made dough, as a result, we normally see warmer water being used in a home made dough than we would in a store made dough. The thing to remember is finished dough temperature is what we are striving for. This is what sets the stage for fermentation and ultimately flavor development and handling properties.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2039
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: cold water technique--worked
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2012, 08:56:22 AM »
Here are the pizza pics for this formulation.  I got excellent browning but the crust was a tad too sweet for me.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.