Author Topic: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?  (Read 12190 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dineomite

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 202
  • Location: Cleveland, OH
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2012, 09:28:34 PM »
shuboyje, somewhere along the line this became about shorter cook times. If that's what the original post was about then it was lost on me. Nowhere did I imply the Lodge or even the 1/4" steel lead to sub-six minute cooks.

I'm pretty certain the title of the post is not "What type of Steel Plate is Fastest?"

I don't have a dog in the fight. I don't own stock in Lodge, Walmart or even own a piece of the action for Baking Steel.

Communist, you'll be happy to know that I didn't have to file for bankruptcy due to the higher gas bill. I look forward to your demonstration on how to use less gas, heating twice as much metal.


Offline widespreadpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1245
  • Location: NH
    • my beer store opening in june 2011
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2012, 09:53:53 PM »
Dineomite,  I'll be the one to ask.  Whats up with the attitude?  It does not fit around here,  seriously.  

There is a lot to learn here,  starting with such things as,  if someone mentions steel plate around here,  they are interested in achieving the fastest bake possible with the equipment they have.

You should consider changing your tone.  -Marc


Offline shuboyje

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1241
  • Location: Detroit
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #27 on: December 29, 2012, 10:03:55 PM »
With steel it's always about shorter cook times, that is the purpose and reason for steel.  If the concern was food safety WITHOUT the benefits of steel this thread wouldn't exist, you can buy a pizza pan in every store with an NSF sticker on it.  

You entered the conversation and began suggesting alternatives that simply cannot produce the same results as 1/2" steel.  In my opinion that does not make them suitable alternatives.  When this was brought up you seem to have gotten defensive.  That turned it into a conversation about bake time to try and explain why they were not suitable.  

I entered the conversation with the questions I did trying to broach the subject in a civil manor while still getting the proper information on the matter out.  That being the items you suggest are not suitable alternatives to 1/2" steel.  Unfortunately you might not have a dog in this fight,  but you do seem to have some sort of issue with the use of 1/2" steel and any claim that it is superior to alternatives.  This site is all about information, and like most topics there is a ton of bad information on the web about pizza.  Some of us are very serious about making sure the correct information is out there so nobody makes a purchase that leaves them frustrated and disappointed.  Sometimes you ruffle some feather doing that.  


shuboyje, somewhere along the line this became about shorter cook times. If that's what the original post was about then it was lost on me. Nowhere did I imply the Lodge or even the 1/4" steel lead to sub-six minute cooks.

I'm pretty certain the title of the post is not "What type of Steel Plate is Fastest?"

I don't have a dog in the fight. I don't own stock in Lodge, Walmart or even own a piece of the action for Baking Steel.

Communist, you'll be happy to know that I didn't have to file for bankruptcy due to the higher gas bill. I look forward to your demonstration on how to use less gas, heating twice as much metal.

-Jeff

scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2012, 08:51:39 AM »
Cal, I have a detractor who likes to stir up the pot by bringing my credentials into question due to the fact that I don't post photos. He joined the forum under multiple aliases in an effort to make it seem like criticism directed towards me was coming from more than one member, but it was only him. Recently, one of his aliases was banned for multiple accounts and, since you joined right after, and seemed to be edging towards pushing the 'photos or shut up' button, I thought you might have been him and acted accordingly.  I just went and took a look at your blog, and, since you are obviously an adult with a rich life and not a teenager with no life whatsoever, you are not this person.  I apologize for reacting to your request for photos in the manner that I did and moving this thread towards a less friendlier tone.

For the casual hobbyist, bake time tends not be very important, but for the obsessive, bake time is a critical ingredient in pizza. The bake time dictates the transfer of heat and the transfer of heat defines the oven spring.  Faster bake times product better oven spring.  For Neapolitan style pizza, it's almost all about bake time.  Up to 90 seconds, it's Neapolitan pizza, with all of the characteristics faster heat transfer provides (massive oven spring, intense char/leoparding).  Beyond 2 minutes, it ceases to have these characteristics and no longer falls within the style. For NY, the bake time spectrum is much larger and has a far greater subjective component, but, again, for most obsessives, faster is generally better.

If you're dealing with obsessives, and there are a lot of us here, it's impossible to have a discussion about baking materials without discussing bake times.  It's also part of the equation that the zealots are going to nudge non obsessives towards obsessive quality materials, especially when those materials are comparable in price ($40ish for 1/2" steel vs. $30ish for 1/8" cast iron).

Nobody here is saying that anyone has to only strive towards making 4 minute NY style pizzas, but we are encouraging people shopping for new stones to not limit themselves by purchasing products that can't deliver these kinds of times.

I read through a good portion of your blog (which I enjoyed quite a lot), and, I gotta tell you, you seem to be getting pretty obsessive about pizza :)  I would think that with your favorite pizzerias and your newly built WFO, you should be starting to understand what faster bake times bring to the table.  9 years ago, when Reinhart wrote American Pie, he was pretty bake time oblivious.  I chatted with him earlier this year, pointing out that all of his favorite places were fast bakes, and I think he's finally starting to get it.  He recently purchased baking steel in an effort to break the 7 minute barrier, and, while I don't think he'll do it with 1/4", for him to even be thinking about getting faster bakes in his home oven is a huge sign of how far he's traveled since American Pie.

If you can, try to borrow the 1/2" steel plate one more time.  Crank the heat to 550, put the plate close to the broiler and use the broiler during the bake.  You also might want to rework your recipe, since lower temp recipes usually need a little tweaking to work well with faster bakes. You may not achieve the perfect 4 minute pie immediately, but, I promise you, the potential will be there in that plate and you may be pleasantly surprised when you reach the 4 minute NY mark.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 08:54:58 AM by scott123 »

Offline mistachy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 71
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2013, 12:12:08 PM »
Make sure all the edges are smooth before you leave.  Take a cotton ball and wipe the edges, if the ball sticks or leaves strings, ask for it to be redone.  Especially if they sheared it, water jet is better but not perfect

Wipe the plate with any alcohol that you have  (denatured, rubbing, vodka, whatever...)  This will remove the 'mill scale'

Spray/rub the plate with any oil that you have (Pam, olive, vegetable, Crisco) and wipe it off.  Fire the oven to 400 or so, recoat the plate with oil and bake it for an hour, turn the oven off and let it cool down on its own.  Put a cookie sheet under it in the oven in case it drips.  Repeat the oil/ heat cycle until it is clean or your just tired of doing it.

Never wash the plate with water, and never scratch it.  Use a plastic scrubby to clean it.  The oil can be sticky on the plate after it is fired so use a plastic bag or wax paper to store it in.  The oil will protect the steel from rusting.

My edges are sharp. The company i went too wouldnt smooth them. Their price was good for the steel compared to else ive been so i went ahead and bought it. should i use a grinder to smooth them? or do i have to have it done professionally?

scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2013, 12:17:39 PM »
Sandpaper will take down the sharp edges. They don't need to be rounded, just dulled a bit so they aren't a danger.

Offline shuboyje

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1241
  • Location: Detroit
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2013, 12:23:40 PM »
If you have a grinder and know how to use it for a nice smooth result that would be great.  Sand paper will work, just a bit more time consuming.  The ideal solution would probably me a mix of the two.  Grind it into rough shape, then finish it smooth with sand paper.
-Jeff

Offline mttfrog13

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 23
  • Location: Conshocken, PA
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2013, 05:07:20 PM »
I just picked up an a36 steel plate from a local steel supplier. They cut it to my preferences which was 3/8" x 16" x 15". I figured that 3/8" would be a good balance between 1/4" which some people on the forum are saying isn't much better than a stone, and 1/2" which seems extremely heavy and would take forever to heat. They also rounded the 4 corners for me and ground down the edges. All this for just $25.

The only thing I'm not liking is that it's covered in mill. Enough that it will probably darken the crust and make it look unappetizing. So is the recommendation to soak the plate in vinegar overnight to remove the mill? In the meantime I'll probably use parchment.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12514
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2013, 05:13:06 PM »
I just picked up an a36 steel plate from a local steel supplier. They cut it to my preferences which was 3/8" x 16" x 15". I figured that 3/8" would be a good balance between 1/4" which some people on the forum are saying isn't much better than a stone, and 1/2" which seems extremely heavy and would take forever to heat. They also rounded the 4 corners for me and ground down the edges. All this for just $25.

The only thing I'm not liking is that it's covered in mill. Enough that it will probably darken the crust and make it look unappetizing. So is the recommendation to soak the plate in vinegar overnight to remove the mill? In the meantime I'll probably use parchment.
I suggest a Scotch Bright pad scuff with some vinegar, rinse, rub a 'lil oil on there with a paper towel an then put that dude to work.  :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline mistachy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 71
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #34 on: April 26, 2013, 09:20:13 PM »
I just picked up an a36 steel plate from a local steel supplier. They cut it to my preferences which was 3/8" x 16" x 15". I figured that 3/8" would be a good balance between 1/4" which some people on the forum are saying isn't much better than a stone, and 1/2" which seems extremely heavy and would take forever to heat. They also rounded the 4 corners for me and ground down the edges. All this for just $25.

The only thing I'm not liking is that it's covered in mill. Enough that it will probably darken the crust and make it look unappetizing. So is the recommendation to soak the plate in vinegar overnight to remove the mill? In the meantime I'll probably use parchment.

buy a couple galons of vinegar and soak it for 24 to 48 hrs, all of that shtuff will come off

Offline mttfrog13

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 23
  • Location: Conshocken, PA
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2013, 11:21:49 PM »
buy a couple galons of vinegar and soak it for 24 to 48 hrs, all of that shtuff will come off
I took a look at your thread about your steel plate. The type of mill scale on your plate looks just like mine. It isn't really "scaly" and as I scrub it, it comes off as a dust. It's as if there were small metal particles/dust infused into the steel rather than there being some type of melted metal layer on top of the steel. The mill scale is coming off as a metal dust, rather than metal flakes. Anyway, I'll be soaking it in vinegar tomorrow night and hopefully I can have all of this mill scale off.

I used parchment to make pizza on tonight and it worked perfectly. The steel plate helped my pizza better than I expected. The cornicione grew very large and fluffy with large holes, and the bottom crust was pale and spotted with dark brown/char spots. I finished the pizza in 4.5 minutes which was really an incredible thing to witness. It was a bit hectic, as it was my first time using a pizza peel, parchment, and any type of pizza steel/stone. On top of that I made 3 pizzas for myself and my three hungry housemates.

Offline mistachy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 71
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2013, 11:26:20 PM »
I took a look at your thread about your steel plate. The type of mill scale on your plate looks just like mine. It isn't really "scaly" and as I scrub it, it comes off as a dust. It's as if there were small metal particles/dust infused into the steel rather than there being some type of melted metal layer on top of the steel. The mill scale is coming off as a metal dust, rather than metal flakes. Anyway, I'll be soaking it in vinegar tomorrow night and hopefully I can have all of this mill scale off.

I used parchment to make pizza on tonight and it worked perfectly. The steel plate helped my pizza better than I expected. The cornicione grew very large and fluffy with large holes, and the bottom crust was pale and spotted with dark brown/char spots. I finished the pizza in 4.5 minutes which was really an incredible thing to witness. It was a bit hectic, as it was my first time using a pizza peel, parchment, and any type of pizza steel/stone. On top of that I made 3 pizzas for myself and my three hungry housemates.
Make sure its completely submerged, and dont take it out early or you will be doing a lot of unnecessary sanding. I dont ever take mines out of the oven. I even reheat day old papajohns and pizza hut pizzas on it.

Offline dough-re-mi

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #37 on: May 19, 2013, 03:05:39 PM »
Does anybody know if 2 quarter-inch plates laid on top of each other would have noticeably different baking performance than a single 1/2 inch plate?

It seem like there shouldn't be much thermodynamic difference, but the two lighter plates would be easier to move when necessary than one heavy one. thanks

ps - my camera's battery was dead today, or I would have finally posted pictures; my first try at a Chicago 9 inch Malnati's-style deep dish turned out flawless about an hour ago, no difficulties whatsoever, because of the incredible help here. I don't know any other place on the internet remotely like this place.

I have been lurking on and off for years, soaking up knowledge, and I really want to thank everybody.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12514
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #38 on: May 19, 2013, 05:53:51 PM »
Get a 1/2in. plate cut in half.  :)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline caymus

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 242
  • Location: Western Massachusetts
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2013, 07:12:11 PM »
Does anybody know if 2 quarter-inch plates laid on top of each other would have noticeably different baking performance than a single 1/2 inch plate?

Any air between the plates will act as an insulator. I am not sure if the thinner plates can warp.  I keep my 1/2 plate in the oven most of the time(but I don't have a wife nagging me)

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 147
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #40 on: June 28, 2013, 06:17:11 PM »
Does anybody know if 2 quarter-inch plates laid on top of each other would have noticeably different baking performance than a single 1/2 inch plate?

It seem like there shouldn't be much thermodynamic difference, but the two lighter plates would be easier to move when necessary than one heavy one. thanks
Thermal dynamically speaking any interface (break/gap) between materials will create thermal impedance or in simpler terms, will transfer heat slower.  Likely stacking two 1/4" on top of each other will cook better than just a single layer, but it won't be the same as 1/2".  How big a difference it would be I do not know.

Get a 1/2in. plate cut in half.  :)
This is the perfect solution to anyone having issues with carrying or moving a 1/2" plate.  Ingeniously simple!  Of course if your issue is oven related (i.e. rack bending, insufficient support) then that probably won't solve it.


Now while my day job is dealing with specialty materials used as heatsinks or heatspreaders in the semiconductor industry, I have absolutely no experience with baking on steel.  That however I am looking to change.  I've had a fairly long hiatus from baking pizza's but now I'm catching the bug again, and made 3 pies earlier this week and have 12 assorted dough balls fermenting in the fridge in preparation for this weekends pizza party.  I have my eye's on a Industrial Materials house that will be open tomorrow morning and which I plan to visit, but I'm not sure of the quality (i.e. cleanliness) of products they may have and so whatever I get may not be good enough for me to use that evening.  We will see though.   >:D

I was initially chickening out and considering only going with 1/4", but now I'm leaning more toward 3/8" and possibly the whole enchilada (1/2").  My concern isn't so much being able to manage moving it about, but as I noted above, the strain it may put on the oven.  This is particularly a concern for me as I will often (will plan to more often at least) throw pizza parties at friends houses and would prefer not to damage their oven.

So the question is... how much weight can a typical oven rack safely hold?  I think one site I Googled claimed that said the industry standard was only 25lbs.   ???  :-\

What is the typical size (X" x Y" x Z") steel sheet that people are using? 

Some numbers (or calc your own HERE):
16" x 16" x 3/8" = 27lbs
20" x 16" x 3/8" = 34lbs
16" x 16" x 1/2" = 36lbs
18" x 16" x 1/2" = 41lbs

Cheers!

-Jon
Jon

Offline dmcavanagh

  • In Memoriam
  • Posts: 1912
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #41 on: June 28, 2013, 06:27:11 PM »
Jon, I recently bought the "Modernist Cuisine" steel plate, 16"x14"x3/4" and it weights 22 lb. My oven is a very new model and the rack that holds the steel does bow slightly from the weight. Now enough to cause damage, but I myself would hesitate to go much heavier without some how reinforcing the rack. As for the benefits of the steel itself, I make thin NY-ish style pizzas and I still much prefer my old stone!
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014


scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #42 on: June 28, 2013, 07:22:36 PM »
Jon, you would have a lot of home oven owners screaming murder if 30#ish Thanksgiving Turkeys caused their oven shelves to fail.

A good number of forum members have purchased very heavy steel plates, and, so far, the only sign of shelf impact has been a bow- and, when it's occurred, the bow hasn't been permanent.

If you are worried about the shelf, as you fully know, there's always steel bar/square steel tubing.  You're one of the only forum members who's gone this route.  There's no way that steel of up to 60 lb. would bend square tubing.  If this isn't for your own oven, bring a long piece of tubing and cut it at your friend's house with a hacksaw after you've taking the measurement.

Are you still working with the same gas oven?  Steel is not recommended unless you have a broiler in the main compartment.

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 147
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #43 on: July 02, 2013, 01:38:18 PM »
Jon, I recently bought the "Modernist Cuisine" steel plate, 16"x14"x3/4" and it weights 22 lb.
Thanks for the response, but I'm Curious what kind of "steel" that is.  A36 alloy steel in those dimensions would come in at 47.5lbs

Jon, you would have a lot of home oven owners screaming murder if 30#ish Thanksgiving Turkeys caused their oven shelves to fail.

A good number of forum members have purchased very heavy steel plates, and, so far, the only sign of shelf impact has been a bow- and, when it's occurred, the bow hasn't been permanent.

If you are worried about the shelf, as you fully know, there's always steel bar/square steel tubing.  You're one of the only forum members who's gone this route.  There's no way that steel of up to 60 lb. would bend square tubing.  If this isn't for your own oven, bring a long piece of tubing and cut it at your friend's house with a hacksaw after you've taking the measurement.

Are you still working with the same gas oven?  Steel is not recommended unless you have a broiler in the main compartment.
Hi Scott.  Great point regarding turkeys, thanksgiving hadn't even crossed my mind, but that is so true.  America would be up in arms.
Additionally, good memory and great point regarding the broiler.  My home oven is still an old gas unit which has a separate broiler compartment/drawer at the bottom of the oven.  I've found out that it is pretty much useless for baking cakes as it just tends to heat up and keep heating up until it maxes out around 700.  Great for high temps but a bit of a pain in the butt if you are trying to regulate or tweak your temps.

I ended up going to the scrap yard on Saturday morning and had them cut a 18" x 16" x 1/2" steel plate for me.  Although they had to make two cuts, they only charged me for 1 and I neglected to complain.   :-[  I also couldn't pass up a perfectly sized piece of scrap that was 20" x 16" x 1/4".   All said and done I think I paid $49 for both.  The 1/2" one needs a little more work cleaning it but I was able to clean up the 1/4" in time for the pizza party I threw at my friends house (500F electric with broiler in main compartment)

I prepared some DKM cracker crust as well as some NY Style dough.  I unfortunately only got a picture of one of the pizza's which I think was the first NY one and as you can see it's alright, but it could have used a tad more char.  I had positioned the 1/4" steel on the second rack slot down from the top (roughly 7") and was trying to switch on the broiler prior to launching the pie.  I think I was only able to get about 80% of the potential from the setup, but with a bit more practice and possibly moving it up to the top I might get some better results.

Unrelated to steel plates, but of the 15 dough balls I had I only made 9 pies I think.   The next day though I tossed my stone in the oven and decided to see if I could make some bread from the left over NY dough balls.  This was inspired by Chau's "Lazy Man's Bread" and all I did was flour the dough ball, roughly shape it into a bowl, threw it on the stone at 500F, covered with a metal mixing bowl for 20min, remove mixing bowl for 20min at 450f and wow!  NY pizza bead!  I got fancy and stuffed cheese in one and chocolate in another and they were a big hit. 

-Jonathan

P.S.  Scott, I'll be on the East coast the week after the 4th and will likely hit up Pizza Town USA on the 10th :)  Can't wait.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2013, 01:43:27 PM by PapaJon »
Jon

scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #44 on: July 02, 2013, 02:48:56 PM »
So, Jon, I tell you not to buy steel, and, what you do? Buy two pieces.  I'm glad we're both on the same page here  :-D

I can see that you bought this for a friend's oven that does have a broiler, so it's not a total waste, but, as far as your home oven is concerned, as far as what we've seen people do with steel in a broilerless setup, you just bought a paperweight.

Now, the operative words in this statement are 'what we've seen.'  Claims have been made that quality pies can be achieved.  While I trust the people making these claims implicitly, I don't think we can declare broilerless steel viable for safely (without having to handle a 550+ degree plate) baking pizzatown quality pies.  At least not yet.

On the other hand, my broilerless setup (vs. 3.0  ;D ) is showing tremendous promise:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,15856.msg262732.html#msg262732

He's dealing with Mexican flour and an altitude of 8,000 ft (the highest of anyone in the forum), but within a month, he'll be making better than pizzatown quality pies.

I know you just bought the steel and most likely want to play with it, but, if you really want the most of your oven, my setup will get you there far faster.

Btw, many 500 deg. ovens exceed 500, but, for those that can only reach 500, steel won't brown the bottom fast enough.  For this crowd, the only option is 3/8"-1/2" aluminum.

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 147
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #45 on: July 02, 2013, 04:11:20 PM »
Hah, you know what, you could be right.  I didn't reread my old thread but although I don't recall you telling me not to get steel you very well could have. 

I may see if I can fit either of the plates into the bottom broiler drawer.  I do need to clean up the 1/2" plate first though.
Jon

scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #46 on: July 02, 2013, 04:37:01 PM »
Are you still working with the same gas oven?  Steel is not recommended unless you have a broiler in the main compartment.

Translation: Don't buy steel!  :-D

If there's a chance that steel will get you quick balanced bakes, it's going to be in the drawer, not the main oven, so definitely check the drawer. Broiler drawers tend to be a bit smaller, so your plate might not fit, but see if it does.

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 147
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #47 on: July 02, 2013, 04:39:40 PM »
Oops, that does in fact translate very well.  Actually I failed to subscribe to the post and didn't see your response before I went buying on Saturday.

Jon

scott123

  • Guest
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #48 on: July 02, 2013, 04:59:23 PM »
No worries, Jon.  You'll get plenty of use out of your plate at other people's houses, and, who knows, maybe you're the guy to crack the broilerless steel code. If anyone can do it, my money would be on you.

If you do take this path, you might want to PM Ben Lee

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=3554

to get his thoughts on broiler drawer baking. He's taken it the furthest

http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2012/10/the-pizza-lab-baking-steel-lodge-cast-iron-pizza.html#946490 (his comment is on the bottom of the page)

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 147
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: What type of Steel Plate is Safest?
« Reply #49 on: July 02, 2013, 06:15:34 PM »
Yeah, as I do more than half my baking at friends places with there more modern ovens I'm sure I'll put the steel to good use.  I'll also measure out my broiler drawer tonight and see how the plates fit.  I may not get any baking done for a couple of weeks though as I'm out of dough and I've plans for the 4th and a business trip to the east coast directly after that.

I checked out BenLee's posts here on pizzamaking and didn't see any real mention of his setup or pictures.  He does go into a bit more detail on the seriouseats forum you linked though.  It appears he is only using stone and isn't really sold on steel, at least at higher temps.  I think for his purpose since he is pulling out a tray with the stone on it and resetting it lower after it has been heated, doing that with heavy steel would be much more dangerous if not impossible.  We'll post up if/when I make any experiments.
Jon