Author Topic: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One  (Read 243525 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2005, 07:12:46 PM »
This is a tale of two pizzas—my first serious attempts to make cracker-type crust pizzas. For these pizzas, I used the formulation I put together recently in an attempt to replicate the Round Table dough/crust. First, the formulation I used:

100%, Flour, 9.33 oz. (264.51 g.), (see volume measurements below)
48%, Water, 4.48 oz. (127.01 g.), (5/8 c.)
1.75%, Salt, 0.16 oz. (between 3/4 and 7/8 t.)
1.5%, Shortening (Crisco), 0.14 oz (3.97 g.), (1 t.)
1.0%, Sugar, 0.093 oz. (2.64 g.), (a bit more than 5/8 t.)
1.0%, Non-fat dry milk (Carnation), 0.093 oz. (2.64 g.), (almost 1 7/8 t.)
0.5%, IDY (instant dry yeast), 0.05 oz. (1.42 g.), (a bit less than 1/2 t.)
Water temp.: Adjusted to achieve a finished dough temperature of 80 degrees F
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.08

There were both similarities and differences between the two doughs I made based on the above formulation and their management. In terms of similarities, the quantities of ingredients were selected to produce enough dough in each case to produce a 14-inch dough circle, with a bit of dough left over. I wanted to be sure that there would be enough dough to fit on a 14-inch pizza screen and have a thickness of 1/8-inch, the size and thickness ThatOneGuy specified for a Round Table “large” standard pizza. To establish the requisite amount of dough, I used the weight given by ThatOneGuy for a 14-inch dough circle, 12.50 oz., and calculated that the corresponding thickness factor (TF) was 0.08. I used that thickness factor to calculate an amount of dough sufficient to make a 15-inch dough circle. The 1-inch difference would be the leftover dough (scrap).

The water that I used for both doughs was temperature adjusted to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F, which is apparently an objective used by RT. I used part of this water to reconstitute the Carnation non-fat dry milk and to disable any offending protein or enzyme that might negatively affect the dough. To do this, I combined part of the water with the dry milk and heated it to just below boiling, then let it cool down, and combined it with the rest of the water, which was then cooled to the temperature I calculated would be necessary to achieve the finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F.

Both doughs were processed using a food processor. I simply combined all of the ingredients except for the water/milk mixture in the food processor, slowly added the water/milk mixture, and pulsed for about 40-50 seconds, or until the ingredients took on a cornmeal-like texture. I then gathered the dough and shaped it into a round ball. This is the technique that Steve used with very good results in making the DKM thin-crust dough. In both cases, the finished dough temperature was close to 80 degrees F.

The major ingredient difference between the two doughs was that I used bread flour (2 c. + 1 T. + 2 t.) for the first dough (which I will hereafter refer to as RT1) and King Arthur Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour (2 c. + 2 T. + 2 t.) for the second dough (RT2). I wanted to compare the use of the bread flour and KASL high-gluten flour since Steve and others had indicated a preference for the high-gluten flour for a cracker-type crust.

I used two diametrically different approaches to the dough management for the RT1 and RT2 doughs. The RT1 dough was refrigerated for about 12 hours. It was then rolled out into a large circle from which I cut out a dough circle of 14 inches, trying to simulate in a general way the process described by ThatOneGuy. I found this to be a challenge for the small amount of dough I had to work with. However, I was able easily to roll out the dough and cut out a 14-inch dough circle from the rolled out dough. The 14-inch dough circle had a 1/8-inch thickness. And its weight, at around 12.4 oz., was reasonably close to the 12.5 oz. mentioned by ThatOneGuy. 

I docked the dough circle, put it on the 14-inch pizza screen, dressed it in the usual fashion, and put it in a 500 degree F preheated oven, in which I had also placed a pizza stone on the lowest oven rack position and preheated for about an hour. The pizza was baked (on the middle oven rack position) for about 4 minutes, following which I transferred the pizza to the stone for additional bottom browning of the crust. There were no bubbles formed at any time during the process.

By contrast, for the RT2 dough, I left it to ferment entirely at room temperature, for about 24 hours. This is the approach that Steve has used with good results. Unlike the RT1 dough, which did not rise noticeably during its 12-hours of fermentation in the refrigerator, the RT2 dough rose by about 25 percent, with most of the rise occurring during the first few hours. To roll out and shape the RT2 dough, I used a technique suggested by Tom Lehmann. I rolled the RT2 dough out to a large circle, folded it in quarters, and re-rolled it again, this time to around 15 inches. This is a technique that many of our members use in making deep-dish doughs. I then cut out a 14-inch dough circle, docked it on both sides, placed it in a 14-inch dark cutter pan, and pre-baked the dough for about 4 minutes in a 500 degree F preheated oven. There were many small to medium sized bubbles this time. I removed the pre-baked crust from the oven, dressed it in the usual fashion, and finished baking it at around 475 degrees F for another 5 or 6 minutes, or until the crust was browned and the cheeses were bubbling and just starting to turn brown.

The photos in this post are for the pizza made using the RT1 dough. The photos in the next post are for the pizza made using the RT2 dough. As between the two pizzas, the RT2 pizza was clearly better. The overall flavors were comparable for the most part, but what made the RT2 pizza better for me was that it was far crispier and much more cracker-like than the RT1 pizza. The RT2 crust also had better browning and flavor. Whether the differences were due mainly to the flours used, the dough rolling techniques, or the lack of a pre-bake for the RT1 dough, I don’t yet know, but the RT1 pizza was more chewy than cracker-like. In retrospect, I might have baked the RT1 pizza directly on the preheated pizza stone, as Tom Lehmann frequently recommends for a thin, cracker-type crust (he also recommends overnight cold fermentation of the dough). I might try that approach another time.

Another possibility is to bake the pizza on a perforated cutter pan or disk (neither of which I have at the moment), with or without a pre-bake. I am also inclined to lower the hydration ratio by a few percent for future RT doughs since a drier dough seems more likely to produce a more cracker-like crust. I’m fairly confident that from what I have already learned I will be able to improve upon my results.

Since I have never had a Round Table pizza, someone else who has eaten Round Table’s standard pizza will have to try the formulation specified above to tell us whether I came anywhere close to the RT dough/pizza.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 18, 2005, 07:23:43 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2005, 07:20:06 PM »
...and RT2

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2005, 12:57:12 PM »
Round Table pizza dough does have the typical "flavor" of a dough that has been fermented overnight in the refrigerator.

I found the following pics online showing dough resting at room temp in 2 different areas of the store.

Maybe need to account for another rise just prior to baking?

Also included a pic of the ovens.

I also found a pic from another RT that the dough was being hand stretched over fists before placing onto the discs?

Was going to give the high-gluten recipe a try, but how do you take "dough" temp???
I dont have a digital "kitchen" thermometer and assume it's required?
« Last Edit: October 19, 2005, 01:04:58 PM by Lydia »
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2005, 01:27:01 PM »
Lydia,

Thank you for the photos.

My recollection from what ThatOneGuy said is that the doughs for the pan pizzas are subjected to a rise in the pan but not the doughs for the standard pizzas.

You will need an instant-read thermometer to take the finished dough temperature. It can be of the analog or digital type. I have both but prefer the digital type.

Peter

Offline zappcatt

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2005, 05:01:40 PM »
In my local RoundTable, the oven is a "Lincoln Impinger"

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #25 on: October 20, 2005, 03:57:51 PM »
Went to RT for lunch today.  Great pizza today. I had the first pizza from the 505 degree oven.

For Pete-zza


Large pizza slice = 42 grams. A slice is 1/12 of the total pizza.
Medium is 43.1 and a slice is 1/8 of the total pizza
Small is 40.00 1/6th of total
personal is 113.0
A large pizza has 11 ounces of cheese. The old ratio of cheese was 3:1:1
 meaning 3 mozzarella 1 cheddar 1 provalone and that was for a small I think.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2005, 04:18:24 PM »
elsegundo,

Can you (or Zack) describe the texture of the RT finished crust for me? I know that originally the RT post was moved from Cracker Style to American, which suggests something not quite like a cracker but more in the direction of the "softer" American style. Possibly something in between? The first RT pizza I made was chewy with a cracker-like crust at the outside edges. The second RT pizza I made was much more cracker-like. It had a bit of softness in the middle but the cracker texture increased moving out toward the outer edge.

I guessed on the cheese blend. But I would say that my ratio was pretty close to what you mentioned. I don't use a lot of cheese on my pizzas, so I tend to doubt that I used 11 ounces.

I was also wondering whether RT uses pizza screens as opposed to discs. If discs, are they just the plain aluminum ones or are they the fancier dark, coated discs?

BTW, I came across the following cracker-type recipe from Tom Lehmann. Maybe you can tell me whether that is more like a RT crust or a more crackery one:

Begin with a very basic formula as follows: High protein pizza flour 100%; Salt 1.75%; Compressed yeast 1.5%; olive oil 2%; Water 45% (+/-). Mix the dough in the normal manner. Retard the dough overnight before using it. After allowing the dough balls to warm for an hour or so, pass it through your sheeter to give a dough thickness of about three sixteenths inch. Fold the dough in half twice, so you end up with a quarter sized skin. Use plenty of dusting flour when putting the dough through the sheeter. Now, pass the dough through the sheeter again, sheeting the dough out to full size, about one eighth inch thick this time. Dock the dough, trim to desired diameter, sauce, top, and bake in a deck oven at about 475-500F. Bake the pizza directly on the deck. You will need to use some corn meal or semolina flour as a peel release when peeling the pizza into the oven. This pizza will generally take from 7 to 10 minutes to bake. Shame on you if you try to bake it faster!

Peter


Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #27 on: October 20, 2005, 10:19:56 PM »
Pic Round Table Perforated disc
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline scott r

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2005, 05:25:12 AM »
I am going to have fun trying this place and knowing all the recipe and dough management details ahead of time.  I am curious about the texture of a sheeted and folded over dough.  It sounds like that might end up similar to a frozen pizza crust style that I have always wondered how to make. 

I just checked the website, How is the creamy garlic sauce ?
« Last Edit: December 23, 2005, 05:31:13 AM by scott r »

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #29 on: December 23, 2005, 04:33:50 PM »
The texture, if you picked a good RT place, is going to be a cross between American and crispy. The layering produces the saltine cracker effect and the ingredients produce a little chew. If a croissant were fried, you would get close.  Round Table is part of the original three (California style prior to Puck and CPK): Shakey's RT, and Straw Hat. The idea was to have a fun snack rather than an Italian meal. Of course if you eat three pieces you have a meal.  Boboli might be close also.


Offline scott r

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #30 on: January 01, 2006, 11:45:40 PM »
I got to try the round table pizza and I thought it was exceptional for a chain.  The dough was very tender and I was not expecting that after all the sheeting.  The cheese seemed to be high quality as well.  Everything seemed very fresh and the pizzeria was very clean. I loved all the topping and sauce choices as well as the great selection of specialty pies.  You have to love a place that even has a special sauce for Hawaiian pizza!

Offline GW

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #31 on: January 09, 2006, 03:04:39 PM »
OK, this is an old thread, but I'm new here - so I'm gonna post  ;D.  I'll admit that it's been over ten years since I worked for Round Table, and procedures may have changed since then.  The procedure ThatOneGuy described is pretty much how we did it when I was rolling out dough for them with one exception.  The leftover skins were rolled together at the end of the night, the next day, after the fresh dough was sheeted out, the "re-roll" was spread out on top of the fresh.  The fresh dough was folded over  the older dough, and the whole thing was sent through the sheeeter several more times until it was the proper thickness.  This was for the thin crust, the thick crust or "pan pizza" skins were 100% fresh dough.  Where I worked, the dough was always allowed to ferment overnight.  FWIW, the RTP that AI worked at also used stone deck ovens rather than conveyers.  The pizzas took about 25-50% longer, but had a far superior flavor than the other fracnchise across town that used conveyers.

G

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2006, 04:42:38 PM »
GW,

You are so right. Some Round Tables do re-sheet the dough. The good part is the scrap dough adds flavor. The bad part is the yeast may not be as active.
 
ThatOneGuy did us true Californians such a favor I can't thank him enough.

The decks did produce a better flavor and texture, but can you trust ever-changing workforce with remembering which pizza went in when.
The conveyor system is certainly more consistent and faster. That is important as RTP has a lot of traffic on the weekends.
The flavor isn't better. 

What gave the sauce the extra flavor? I think it was chili flakes.

The cheese was originally mozzarella, provolone and cheddar (in that order of weight). Today I'm not sure.

One question: how cold was the dough when it was sheeted, and how cold was it when the pizza was made?

from the west coast

Offline GW

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #33 on: January 09, 2006, 10:01:29 PM »
I have to add the caveat that the franchisee I worked for didn't always do things "the one best way".  We kept the dough for the thin crust as cold as possible. We always set out the bag of dough for the thick crust out at the beginning of the roll and let it proof at room temp until we were done with the thin.

G

Offline Ed

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2006, 10:42:39 PM »
ThatOneGuy,

As you may know, some jurisdictions do not allow pizza operators to use screens anymore for health reasons (according to pizzatools, Dallas is one of them), so many users have gone to discs (or possibly perforated cutter pans). I assume that a 14-inch screen should work, however, without the need to pre-bake the crust before saucing and dressing. I obviously don't need the dough ring, since I can use the 14-inch screen to lay out a 14-inch dough circle.

Pete-zza,

What are the health issues concerning pizza screens?  Just asking because I just ordered 3 new ones online.

Ed

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #35 on: January 09, 2006, 11:09:26 PM »
Ed,

As best I can tell it has to do with cleaning the screens. Tom Lehmann was asked a while back about seasoning pizza screens and he replied as follows:

Why not save yourself a lot of work and just buy pre-seasoned (black colored) pizza disks? They bake as well or better, they will certainly last longer, health departments smile when they see them, you can soak/wash them without fear of destroying the seasoning, and they will never need to be redone.

The pizzatools.com website makes it a point to mention that its Quik-Disks are approved by health departments.

I, too, have several pizza screens and use them all the time. I've never worried about any health issues. The trend industry-wide seems to me moving in the direction of using disks. They now come with a variety of sizes and hole sizes/configurations. They are much more expensive than screens, however, especially the preseasoned coted disks, like the pizzatools Quik-Disks.

Peter

Offline Steve

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #36 on: March 07, 2006, 12:59:47 PM »
Round Table flour bag.
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Offline BigV

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #37 on: March 09, 2006, 10:24:23 PM »
Interesting.

They are using more powdered milk than yeast.  That explains the browning on the ones I've had.

The malted barley flour is also an interesting ingredient.

Offline BigV

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #38 on: March 09, 2006, 10:32:29 PM »
Replying to my own posts now  ::)

Those black screens are nice.  Problem with the old style is you can't wash them and things tend to stick to them (cheese, dough etc...).  I'm sure that the passes through the oven kill anything on them, they just look nasty.

I think the texture with the black ones is better as well.

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #39 on: March 10, 2006, 11:45:10 AM »
BigV

If you put the instructions on the bag with directions on sheeting found elsewhere in one of the other Round Table parts you have your recipe. BTW, that hydrogenated oil is Crisco shortening by any other name.

Whey can be substituted for the milk and some chains do and that includes Straw Hat. Whey is cheaper and does not need refrigeration I am told.