Author Topic: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One  (Read 279990 times)

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Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #225 on: December 01, 2007, 11:30:22 AM »
Peter
In my opinion there is one big misconception in this conversation about sheeted doughs.  The addition of flour has absolutely nothing to do with the sheeting process except to make the dough easy to handle...it has nothing to do with layering...in fact, I don't even flour my dough until the lamination process (the compression process) is done and I am sheeting the dough to correct thickness.  You have to flour the dough then simply to keep the dough from sticking to itself.
My next experiment is going to be to increase the hydration of these doughs, keep them undermixed, and see how the "cracker crust method" of formation changes the different skins...maybe there will be a huge winner in there??  Sure hope so!!
I have to say one more time...your RT crust is wonderful!!
John


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #226 on: December 01, 2007, 12:24:39 PM »
Thanks, John. Which RT dough clone recipe did you use?

When I first started playing around with the Lehmann cracker-style dough, which is a medium-hydration dough, I used a layering approach with a small dusting of flour between the layers. As with the instructions given along the same lines by ThatOneGuy, who worked for RT, I assumed that the flour between the layers contributed to the desired texture of the finished RT crust. The hydration I used for the RT dough clone recipes is somewhere between a low-hydration dough (the DKM cracker style dough being a good example) and a medium-hydration dough (the Lehmann soda cracker dough being a good example). Maybe the overall RT dough hydration goes down more than we think with all the added bench flour. In fact, the starting hydration may be higher than what we have been using.

I am planning soon to try member buzz's "Giordano's" cracker-style dough, which is definitely a high-hydration dough, to see the difference. At the urging of member November, I have been meaning to try a high-hydration version, and buzz's recipe seems to fit the bill. As I try to do with all new recipes I try, I will be following buzz's instructions as closely as I can with my equipment, including docking and pre-baking the skin, which are steps that you have studiously avoided. So, if you dispense with these steps in your higher hydration doughs, I will be anxious to hear of your results.

Peter

Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #227 on: December 01, 2007, 08:57:18 PM »
The recipe I used was in one of Dan's posts with your name on it:
100% flour
48  % water
2    %salt
2    %shortening
2   % sugar
1.25%  dry milk
.40  % yeast

Hey Peter, a little off the subject, but maybe you can help me out.  Through all the experimentation I've been doing in my home oven on the cracker crust, I'm right on the verge of a huge breakthrough in my dough at work.  I have mentioned that even though we buy the exact same flour product every single week, the changes in the flour have a noticable affect on the final dough.  Sometimes the flour seems very strong (this makes the worst crust), and sometimes it's weaker (and this makes the best crust).  Well, we finally figured out that when we get the real strong stuff (which seems to be in the winter time), we can compensate by 1) cutting mixing time and/or 2) lowering the hydration rate.  These are the kinds of problems which make this dough so damned hard to get consistent (maybe it's why not too many people use the method anymore?)  To give you an idea of the volume we do, I rolled over 1200 pounds of dough on the Friday, Saturday, and Sunday after Thanksgiving....so experimenting on this much product seems foolhardy.  I am tinkering with the idea, that maybe we should keep the hydration percentage constant on every single flour...and just monitor/adjust the mix times as the flour strength changes...of course this means monitoring water temperature also as the friction factor will change with the different flours and mix times.  Do you have any ideas on my situation?
Thanks Peter

JOhn
I'm gonna take a look at the giordano's pizza, and see how fun it is

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #228 on: December 02, 2007, 09:20:19 AM »
John,

I have some thoughts on this matter, but to keep this thread from veering off in another direction would you mind reposting the second part of your post as a new topic under General Pizza Making? Thanks.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 02, 2007, 09:24:04 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #229 on: December 02, 2007, 11:15:05 PM »
Peter
In my opinion there is one big misconception in this conversation about sheeted doughs.  The addition of flour has absolutely nothing to do with the sheeting process except to make the dough easy to handle...it has nothing to do with layering...in fact, I don't even flour my dough until the lamination process (the compression process) is done and I am sheeting the dough to correct thickness.  You have to flour the dough then simply to keep the dough from sticking to itself.
My next experiment is going to be to increase the hydration of these doughs, keep them undermixed, and see how the "cracker crust method" of formation changes the different skins...maybe there will be a huge winner in there??  Sure hope so!!
I have to say one more time...your RT crust is wonderful!!
John

Hi John,

After a series of experiments trying to make a laminated crust without the use of a sheeter, I arrived at your exact comments. I completely agree that is isn't the flour that is so crucial to the lamination process, it's the SHEETER!

The only part of this crust that still has me baffled, (which I am hoping you could shed some light on) is the lamination process itself WITH the usage of a sheeter. I understand that you make a thin sheet, then fold, then it passes through the sheeter. This process is typically done 2-3 times. What I dont really understand is without liberal amounts of flour, what keeps the dough from reincorporating to itself? Is it strictly the speed of the sheeter? The pressure? Is the final pass done at a lower compression factor to prevent 100% reincorporation? Is the dough even rolled after the final fold?

I am not asking for any secrets here, just whether or not it's sheeted hard after the final fold.

Peter, your contributions to this clone has been remarkable THANK YOU!. I think the missing link has always been the sheeter with this recipe. The closest I have come to a workable clone is using the latest recipe you proposed with a pasta roller. When making the pie, I don't fold and roll like one would be able to do with a sheeter. Instead I make several thin sheets, use a rolling pin on them ever so slightly, then use a die to cut out my pie. This is why I am interested in some feedback from John, because I HAVE used a pasta roller for each fold and roll cycle and I always end up with a 90-100% reincorporated crust.

Offline dland

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #230 on: December 03, 2007, 01:11:00 AM »
Bummer! It's all about the bubbles, right?

Dense and bready dosen't sound right at all. Hmmm. I haven't had that issue come up with this formula. Could be the brand.

I let the dough set at room temp. for at least 4 hours and then I either use it at that point or throw it in the fridge for use next day (24 hrs). Removing from fridge 1 hr. before rolling.

I am not docking, layering/sheeting at this point and time. The folding was with a different formula.

I'm using a small 5 inch roller to focus on the center of the dough. It helps move the bubles to the edge. I know pampered Chef sells them, and have seen them in a few specialty shops. SOmetimes they have 2 different sized rollers on each end of the handle. (If you haven't seen one, I know that it can sound weird.)

The amounts of ingredients in the first sauce recipe are a bit low and it's also missing the ground white pepper, ground fennel and cumin. Remember this is still a work in progress, it's not totally there yet.

Also remember to leave a good 1 1/2 - 2 inch border. The toppings tend to weigh-down the bubbles.
If you add enough cheese it will spread as it melts and still allows the bubbles to form. Don't ask how much is enough, this is one of those things I've learned to eye-ball and every brand spreads differently.

Even very slight over-mixing seems to affect the bubbles. Still not totally sure about it though.
Don't get too frustrated yet. Somehow my son manages to kill the bubbles, and I haven't quite figured out exactly what he's doing to cause it. Hopefully, I'll catch whatever it is.

Hope this helps.

I made this recipe again this weekend following Lydia's instructions on fermentation time and temperatures as well as keeping a thicker outside ring. I was rewarded much much better results. The crust was crisp on the bottom, soft and light inside, and had nice chew to it. And, of course, there were plenty of big, beautiful bubbles. Really very close to RT in my opinion. It's been a few years since I've had Round Table, but this is pretty much how I remember it being. And even if it's not dead-on it's still a really good crust. Great job Lydia and thanks so much!

I did fold the dough inward like she mentioned creating a layered effect. I can't be certain without constructing a few more pizzas both with and without using this technique, but it did seem to have a positive effect on the resulting crust in terms of creating airiness and bubbles. It seems to be that the layers allow the individual sheets of dough to rise and expand independently allowing more air to sit between them (somewhat like the layers of baklava dough).

Everyone seems to be very impressed with Peter's RT dough so I'm going to give that a shot next, but big kudos to Lydia on this one.

Dave

Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #231 on: December 03, 2007, 12:19:02 PM »
Dan
There are no secrets......here is how it goes
I take a 20 pound piece of dough and flatten it by hand
I then sheet the dough to about one half inch...it's probably only 4 feet by 24 inches (no flour)
I then add all the scraps from the previous roll and fold the dough to fit through the sheeter
I then sheet the dough to about three quarters inch (24 inch by 3 feet) no flour
I then fold this dough in half lengthwise and start sheeting
As the dough starts thinning I add just enough flour to stop the sticking (this will vary with the dough)
The final result (for 16 inch skins) is a sheet of dough 17 inches wide by 12 or so feet long

Remember that the process of sheeting or rolling is really no different than kneading, when you knead dough by hand you use as little flour as possible, the same is true with sheeting (at least, this is how I do it)
To give you an example....I use about 2 pounds of flour to sheet 270 pounds of dough..that's just a guess, but I think its pretty accurate.  When I cut my sheet into circles there is no noticable flour on the skin...it is incorporated into the dough.  So, it's just dry enough so you can unfold a long sheet of dough without it sticking to itself.

Hope this helps
John

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #232 on: December 06, 2007, 12:34:53 AM »
"I then fold this dough in half lengthwise and start sheeting"

This is the secret. It is the secret that has eluded many.  The fold has produced two layers. Without the folding you just have a skinny pizza. If you do a business letter fold like I do you have three layers.  A laminated dough.


Layers are beautiful.


Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #233 on: December 06, 2007, 01:06:27 AM »
Just my opinion, but the layers are not the ends, they are the means to the ends...that is, the layers are the method used to compress cells that create the skin.  Actually, in the restaurant setting, not only do I have 6 layers, but in between these layers are all the scraps from previous rolls.  It's the compression, with minimal work on the dough itself.
John


Offline BTB

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #234 on: December 06, 2007, 09:44:11 AM »
While I do not remember ever having a Round Table pizza, I thought I would give a try at making one as I'm always interested in finding a good pizza recipe.  I chose this formulation for the dough/crust from one Pete mentioned above:

Flour (100%):    256.6 g  |  9.05 oz | 0.57 lbs
Water (48.3%):    123.94 g  |  4.37 oz | 0.27 lbs
IDY (.40%):    1.03 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.34 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Salt (2.08%):    5.34 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.96 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
Sugar (2.08%):    5.34 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.34 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
Dry Non-Fat Milk (1.25%):    3.21 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 2.23 tsp | 0.74 tbsp
Shortening (2.08%):    5.34 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.34 tsp | 0.45 tbsp
Total (156.19%):   400.79 g | 14.14 oz | 0.88 lbs | TF = 0.08

For size, I put in a 15" round pizza in the expanded dough calculation tool as I had planned to cut the rolled out dough onto my lightly oiled 14" cutter pan.  I used my new Kitchen Aid food processor, which seems to be a great device to make dough for some of these home made pizza crusts.  I mixed all the dry ingredients first (used Harvest King flour), then added and pulsed the mixture with the shortening (Crisco), then added the water and pulsed for another 30 to 40 seconds.  Very simple and quick way to make the dough.  The crumbled dough mixture is thereafter so very easy to form into a ball, which weighed 13.6 ounces . . . a little less than the calculation tool indicated. 

I then put the dough ball into a zip lock bag, sealing it after getting most of the air out, and let it rise on the counter for 4 to 5 hours.  After it nearly doubled in size, I then put it into the refrigerator for about 42 hours.  Thereafter I let the dough warm up on the counter for about an hour and then rolled it out by hand to about a 15 inch diameter.  I didn't do any layering or refolding or such, as I am just first experimenting to get an idea of what this formulation tasted like.  I used my new 14" dark, anodized nonperforated cutter pan (from pizzatools.com), which I've really come to like alot.  I was very reluctant at first to get one, but I'm glad I did as it really has done the job well for me.  I haven't used my pizza screens or stone since I got the cutter pan.

After docking the pizza with the docker, I put the skin in the lightly oiled cutter pan, and pre-baked it at 475 degrees F for about 4 minutes on the lowest oven rack position.  After dressing the pizza with sauce (delicious 6 in 1 crushed tomatoes doctored up with a number of ingredients), toppings and cheese, the pizza was returned to the oven and baked on the lowest rack for around 7 minutes, then moved (still in the cutter pan) to the top oven rack for 2 to 3 minutes to help in browning the top of the pizza.  Some pictures below (sorry the close-up one isn't in focus well for some reason).

This pizza, too, was excellent.  It was crispy and firm enough to hold a piece straight out with all the toppings without drooping.  To me it was another type of cracker crust and I will categorize it as such in my book of recipes.  It was different in flavor and texture from the DKM version that I've tried recently and I plan to do a side by side comparison in the near future to better learn about the taste and other characteristics of each.  Right now, they both are great in my book.  The next time I try this formulation, however, I think I may roll out the crust to be a little thicker.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #235 on: December 06, 2007, 10:32:25 AM »
The crumbled dough mixture is thereafter so very easy to form into a ball, which weighed 13.6 ounces . . . a little less than the calculation tool indicated.

BTB,

I'm glad to see that the pizza worked out well for you.

One of the nice features of the dough calculating tool is that you can compensate for minor dough losses during preparation, by using the bowl residue compensation feature. Each dough formulation has its own value, but I usually start with 1.5% as the value to enter into the tool and adjust with experience. Another little trick that I use, which was given to me by member November, is to first rinse out the cup I plan to use to weigh the water with water, then tare the cup on my digital scale, and then add the water to the desired weight. That way, when you empty the cup, you will get pretty much all of the weighed amount of water out of it even though there is residual water still clinging to the sides of the cup.

Peter


Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #236 on: December 06, 2007, 04:49:39 PM »
Just my opinion, but the layers are not the ends, they are the means to the ends...that is, the layers are the method used to compress cells that create the skin.  Actually, in the restaurant setting, not only do I have 6 layers, but in between these layers are all the scraps from previous rolls.  It's the compression, with minimal work on the dough itself.
John

John, Is the thickness kept the same with each pass through the sheeter? Or do you go slightly smaller and smaller each time, then thicker on the last folded sheet?

Offline fazzari

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #237 on: December 06, 2007, 06:40:35 PM »
Dan
The goal is to get it thin in as few passes as possible.  The variables are obviously the strength of the dough and the strength of your sheeter.  Remember that each pass through the rollers develops your dough....which is exactly why you undermixed it in the first place.
John

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #238 on: December 12, 2007, 02:55:33 PM »
Dan
The goal is to get it thin in as few passes as possible.  The variables are obviously the strength of the dough and the strength of your sheeter.  Remember that each pass through the rollers develops your dough....which is exactly why you undermixed it in the first place.
John

This is precisely the problem you run into using a rolling pin. It just takes to long to get down to the next thickness factor and the dough develops TOO much on the table. I think the warming method that has been recently employed for this style is a breakthrough for those of us that don't have professional dough sheeters. Its a huge step forward for the home cracker style baker, but for the purist, it still falls short of a good sheeted crust.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2007, 02:57:58 PM by DNA Dan »

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #239 on: December 12, 2007, 05:19:28 PM »

12 oz harvest king
4 oz Quaker Harina preparada flour tortilla mix
.25 instant yeast

8.40 oz water approx. 90F

process in food processor until just combined.
Some yeast will not be dissolved.
Proof at the very least 3-4  hours room temp
Proof overnight in fridge for criper crust.

Makes 2, 14 inch pizza
Or roll 16” and it will be flakier

Can divide dough and make 2, 12’s but it’s a bit heavy and the crust doesn’t crisp as well.( Sameday)
But with the overnight ferment it ‘s more like the current Shakey’s.

Lydia, I finally got some Harina Preparada online. Cost me ~$8 to ship about $8 worth of flour. I am just dying to try this out, so I didn't bother with the cost involved.

Have you made any adjustments to the recipe as you have laid out previously? I think I will try and sheet some ala "elsegundo" method as well.

Offline dland

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #240 on: December 18, 2007, 12:16:46 AM »
scott,

There is nothing more satisfying to a pizza maker than getting results that are much better than anticipated. I'd love to see some photos if you can manage that sometime.

Interestingly, your final dough formulation after increasing the amounts of salt, shortening, and sugar to 10 g. each still abides by the pecking order of the ingredients used in the RT pizza flour blend. And the baker's percents of the salt, shortening, and sugar are all within normal ranges. If you had used the nonfat dry milk, the total weight would have come to 1502.96 g. (twice 751.48 g. for two pizzas). Your actual dough weight should have been just a bit less because of the omission of the nonfat dry milk. As a point of clarification, did you make 16" pizzas, as called for in the original dough formulation? I don't recall that your pizza stone was large enough for 16" pizzas.

I played around with my spreadsheet and if my calculations are correct I get the following as the basic dough formulation (for one 16" pizza plus a bit of scrap) you ended up with after using the increased amounts of salt, shortening, and sugar (I left in the nonfat dry milk):

100%, Flour (King Harvest), 481.08 g., 16.97 oz., 1.06 lb.
48.3%, Water, 232.36 g., 8.20 oz., 0.51 lb.
2.08%, Salt, 10 g., 0.35 oz., 1 3/4 t.
2.08%, Shortening (Crisco), 10 g., 0.35 oz., 2 1/2 t.
2.08%, Sugar, 10 g., 0.35 oz., 2 1/2 t.
1.25%, Nonfat dry milk (Carnation), 6.01 g., 0.21 oz., 4 1/8 t. (a bit more than 1 5/8 t. if baker's grade)
0.40%, Instant dry yeast (IDY), 1.92 g., 0.068 oz., a bit more than 5/8 t
Total dough weight = 751.41 g. (26.50 oz.)

Peter


Peter,

I plan on making the dough recipe you have listed in reply #111, but I have a few questions for you first.

1. What do you recommend for the fermentation process? In your previous posts you noted that the dough came out better when it was fermented at room temperature rather than fermented within the refrigerator. I've also read that some people feel that RT's crust tastes like it's been cold fermented so I'm assuming that both room temperature and refrigerator fermentation are required. Do you have a recommendation on durations?

2. What kind of salt are you using in this recipe? I would assume 1 5/8 teaspoons of a fine grain salt is actually more salt than the same volume of a coarser salt. I've been using fine grained sea salt.

Thanks,
Dave

Offline elsegundo

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #241 on: December 18, 2007, 01:03:41 AM »
Here are the directions from the Round Table premix bag:

1. Put 11 lbs 80-85 degree water into mixing bowl
2. empty contents of bag into mixer.  Bag contents: enriched bleached wheat flour, salt, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil, sugar, non-fat dry milk, yeast  Bag weighs 24.25 pounds

3. Mix on speed #1 for 6 1/2 minutes
4. Dough coming out of mixer should be between 80-85 degrees
5. Remove from bowl, put into food bags, date, and place in cooler.

Hope this helps,

from El Segundo


Offline PizzaBrasil

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #242 on: December 18, 2007, 04:47:45 AM »
Dland:

This last week end, I did a pizza party in my place. As usual ,there were more that 30 persons there.
Pizzas and descriptions will be commented in another thread later.
I am becoming a real fan for one day pre-fermented pizza dough. Highly recommend you to use it. A real winner. Smooth dough, explosive cornicione, delicious taste.
Even if I am talking about VPN / NY style, I bet for one day to your dough too.

Luis

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #243 on: December 18, 2007, 12:14:53 PM »
Peter,

I plan on making the dough recipe you have listed in reply #111, but I have a few questions for you first.

1. What do you recommend for the fermentation process? In your previous posts you noted that the dough came out better when it was fermented at room temperature rather than fermented within the refrigerator. I've also read that some people feel that RT's crust tastes like it's been cold fermented so I'm assuming that both room temperature and refrigerator fermentation are required. Do you have a recommendation on durations?

2. What kind of salt are you using in this recipe? I would assume 1 5/8 teaspoons of a fine grain salt is actually more salt than the same volume of a coarser salt. I've been using fine grained sea salt.

Dave,

If your objective is to replicate the RT dough and pizza, which I assume it is, then I would try to follow the regimen previously described by ThatOneGuy.  That is, I would make the dough, put it into the refrigerator for 8-12 hours, but no longer than 2 days, and then form the skin(s), which can then go back into the refrigerator until ready to use, but be used the same day. I would form the skins along the lines originally described by ThatOneGuy and as I transformed the sequence into a single dough ball format at Reply 82 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg33883.html#msg33883. Since you will be using a rolling pin, I would undermix the dough since the rolling pin will contribute to the dough development. To make it easier to roll out the dough using a rolling pin, I would be inclined to form the dough (whether for a single dough piece or in bulk if you are making more than one skin) into the shape of a long rectangular log about 2” high, and put that log into a suitably shaped storage container to go into the refrigerator. That way, you won’t overwork the dough trying to get it into a rectangular shape to roll out when you remove it from the refrigerator.

As far as salt is concerned, it doesn’t matter whether you are using ordinary table salt or sea salt. The dough calculating tools use the same conversion data for converting from weight to volume measurements. I personally prefer sea salt and that is what I normally use for all my doughs unless I am trying a new recipe for the first time that calls for ordinary table salt.

If you can tell me what size pizza you would like to make, and what ingredients you will be using (for example, will you be using Carnation’s dry milk powder or baker’s grade?), maybe I can help you with the dough formulation. At the time I posted the various iterations of the RT clone dough, I was using a spreadsheet to come up with all the required quantities of ingredients. With the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, which was designed quite a bit later, we now have greater flexibility and perhaps greater accuracy. For example, I would be inclined to make enough dough for a rectangular sheet from which the skin can be easily cut while leaving a modest amount of scrap. Hopefully, the skin will be of the correct weight and thickness factor. 

One point that I would like to make is that a possible disconnect between a pizza prepared at an RT operation and one prepared at home as a clone is the protocol used to bake the pizzas. For example, ThatOneGuy originally said that it took 2-4 minutes to bake a standard RT pizza (4 minutes normally but 2 minutes at slam time). There is no way that I can do that in my oven, whether I am using a screen, a disk, a pizza stone, a cutter pan, or whatever. It will take me about 4 minutes in my home oven just to pre-bake a skin. So, I think that measures that we have not previously considered, or adequately considered, will have to be taken to convert an RT clone made in the home to approach a typical RT pizza as prepared by an RT operation.

Examples of what I have in mind have been given by elsegundo (with his particular pasta roller method), by member fazzari (with the method he described in Reply 221 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg50196.html#msg50196), or by member BTB (with the method he described at Reply 234 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg50365.html#msg50365).  I am also thinking that the dough-warming method as described in the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.0.html might have some merit. I haven’t tried that method with a medium-hydration dough (which is how I characterize the RT clone dough) but my recollection is that the RT clone doughs I made were on the stiff side. If the dough warming method has merit with the RT clone, it might be possible to eliminate the rolling steps altogether, or at least make them easier to do, although pre-baking the skin may still be necessary. Then, the remaining issue would be how to bake the pizzas, that is, using a disk, stone, cutter pan, etc.

I’d like to explore a few possibilities along the above lines, possibly when I have finished my series of experiments with the cracker style. Maybe DNADan has already tried some of the possibilities noted above and has some comments or guidance to offer.

Peter

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #244 on: December 18, 2007, 07:08:57 PM »
Lydia, I finally got some Harina Preparada online. Cost me ~$8 to ship about $8 worth of flour. I am just dying to try this out, so I didn't bother with the cost involved.

Have you made any adjustments to the recipe as you have laid out previously? I think I will try and sheet some ala "elsegundo" method as well.

Dan I haven't made any changes to the formula "yet" but I'm considering some slight changes. I'd like to make more progress toward developing the internal structure that is unique to RT. I'm leaning more toward the idea that the broken texture is caused by the use of "old scrap" to form the center sheet of dough. Fresh scrap didn't have much of an affect internally. 

Also a repost of notes for the Cheater's formula. Be sure to post how things go with the home sheeting method.





I made my dough last night and realized that I have been doing a few things "subconsciously" that needs to be mentioned.

Half-way through the countertop rise I divide the dough (if making 2 pizzas) and turn the dough twice to form each into a ball. This helps the dough become more homogenous and improves the rise volumne.

Also when rolling out the dough, I roll the dough ball in the bench flour then roll the dough out to size, flip it over and bring in four imaginary corners to the center (makes something like a diamond shape but I try to keep it as round as possible), flip it over and press it into a round disc. I don't believe I'm wiping off the bench flour before folding, but I'll need to make the dough again to be for sure. Then proceed rolling the skin to full size. So, I guess what I'm doing is some altered form of sheeting and layering.

If the dough is rolled too thick it can reduce bubble volumne and the bottom crust usually dosen't crisp well and stays pliable. Sometimes longer bake times won't remedy it either.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline dland

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #245 on: December 18, 2007, 10:06:38 PM »
Dave,

If your objective is to replicate the RT dough and pizza, which I assume it is, then I would try to follow the regimen previously described by ThatOneGuy.  That is, I would make the dough, put it into the refrigerator for 8-12 hours, but no longer than 2 days, and then form the skin(s), which can then go back into the refrigerator until ready to use, but be used the same day. I would form the skins along the lines originally described by ThatOneGuy and as I transformed the sequence into a single dough ball format at Reply 82 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg33883.html#msg33883. Since you will be using a rolling pin, I would undermix the dough since the rolling pin will contribute to the dough development. To make it easier to roll out the dough using a rolling pin, I would be inclined to form the dough (whether for a single dough piece or in bulk if you are making more than one skin) into the shape of a long rectangular log about 2” high, and put that log into a suitably shaped storage container to go into the refrigerator. That way, you won’t overwork the dough trying to get it into a rectangular shape to roll out when you remove it from the refrigerator.

As far as salt is concerned, it doesn’t matter whether you are using ordinary table salt or sea salt. The dough calculating tools use the same conversion data for converting from weight to volume measurements. I personally prefer sea salt and that is what I normally use for all my doughs unless I am trying a new recipe for the first time that calls for ordinary table salt.

If you can tell me what size pizza you would like to make, and what ingredients you will be using (for example, will you be using Carnation’s dry milk powder or baker’s grade?), maybe I can help you with the dough formulation. At the time I posted the various iterations of the RT clone dough, I was using a spreadsheet to come up with all the required quantities of ingredients. With the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, which was designed quite a bit later, we now have greater flexibility and perhaps greater accuracy. For example, I would be inclined to make enough dough for a rectangular sheet from which the skin can be easily cut while leaving a modest amount of scrap. Hopefully, the skin will be of the correct weight and thickness factor. 

One point that I would like to make is that a possible disconnect between a pizza prepared at an RT operation and one prepared at home as a clone is the protocol used to bake the pizzas. For example, ThatOneGuy originally said that it took 2-4 minutes to bake a standard RT pizza (4 minutes normally but 2 minutes at slam time). There is no way that I can do that in my oven, whether I am using a screen, a disk, a pizza stone, a cutter pan, or whatever. It will take me about 4 minutes in my home oven just to pre-bake a skin. So, I think that measures that we have not previously considered, or adequately considered, will have to be taken to convert an RT clone made in the home to approach a typical RT pizza as prepared by an RT operation.

Examples of what I have in mind have been given by elsegundo (with his particular pasta roller method), by member fazzari (with the method he described in Reply 221 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg50196.html#msg50196), or by member BTB (with the method he described at Reply 234 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg50365.html#msg50365).  I am also thinking that the dough-warming method as described in the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.0.html might have some merit. I haven’t tried that method with a medium-hydration dough (which is how I characterize the RT clone dough) but my recollection is that the RT clone doughs I made were on the stiff side. If the dough warming method has merit with the RT clone, it might be possible to eliminate the rolling steps altogether, or at least make them easier to do, although pre-baking the skin may still be necessary. Then, the remaining issue would be how to bake the pizzas, that is, using a disk, stone, cutter pan, etc.

I’d like to explore a few possibilities along the above lines, possibly when I have finished my series of experiments with the cracker style. Maybe DNADan has already tried some of the possibilities noted above and has some comments or guidance to offer.

Peter


Peter,

Thanks for the helpful reply. Here is the plan, feel free to comment:

I'm going to make two 16" pizzas using the recipe listed in reply #111 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg34088.html#msg34088). I will be following the formula exactly, down to the brand of ingredients. The Carnation dry milk will be scalded according to reply #20 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg17795.html#msg17795). Since I'll be using a rolling pin, the dough will be under-mixed (just enough to combine the ingredients). The dough for the first one will be put into the refrigerator immediately after it's formed, where it will stay for about 20 hours. The dough for the second will be allowed to ferment at room temperature (around 70 F) for six hours then it will be refrigerated for about 14 hours. Both pizzas will be allowed to warm up at room temperature for 1 hour before cooking (this includes the rolling time).

The dough for both pizzas will be prepared according to reply #82 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg33883.html#msg33883) since it follows ThatOneGuy's recommendations (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg17492.html#msg17492). Both pizzas will be baked on a stone at 500 degrees for 6 to 8 minutes.

So essentially, the variable will be the room temperature fermentation time. We'll see who wins.

Dave
« Last Edit: December 18, 2007, 10:20:43 PM by dland »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #246 on: December 19, 2007, 10:47:10 AM »
Dave,

Your plan looks fine. As noted previously (see Reply 11 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5609.msg47786.html#msg47786), it is not necessary to reconstitute the Carnation dry milk and scald and cool it before using based on the small percent of dry milk you will be using. However, if you want to do a more exact comparison with the prior efforts of others, then feel free to do so.

I ran the percents for the dough formulation you will be using through the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, and using a thickness factor of 0.081, I established that it would take a square sheet of about 18.09” by 18.09” to get the total dough weight of about 751.41 oz. So, that will be an inch to spare on each side of the 16” pizzas you plan to make. The output of the tool using the above inputs is as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (48.3%):
IDY (0.40%):
Salt (2.08%):
Sugar (2.08%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (1.25%):
Shortening (2.08%):
Total (156.19%):
481.13 g  |  16.97 oz | 1.06 lbs
232.39 g  |  8.2 oz | 0.51 lbs
1.92 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.64 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
10.01 g | 0.35 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.79 tsp | 0.6 tbsp
10.01 g | 0.35 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.51 tsp | 0.84 tbsp
6.01 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.18 tsp | 1.39 tbsp
10.01 g | 0.35 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.5 tsp | 0.83 tbsp
751.48 g | 26.51 oz | 1.66 lbs | TF = 0.081

If you’d like, you can add a bowl residue compensation factor to compensate for minor dough losses in the bowl. For example, if you use 1.5% in the expanded dough calculating tool, you will get the following:

Flour (100%):
Water (48.3%):
IDY (0.40%):
Salt (2.08%):
Sugar (2.08%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (1.25%):
Shortening (2.08%):
Total (156.19%):
488.35 g  |  17.23 oz | 1.08 lbs
235.87 g  |  8.32 oz | 0.52 lbs
1.95 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.65 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
10.16 g | 0.36 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.82 tsp | 0.61 tbsp
10.16 g | 0.36 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.55 tsp | 0.85 tbsp
6.1 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.25 tsp | 1.42 tbsp
10.16 g | 0.36 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.54 tsp | 0.85 tbsp
762.75 g | 26.9 oz | 1.68 lbs | TF = 0.082215

If it turns out that your dough weigh ends up a bit too high, you can always trim it back to the amount indicated in the first table (751.48 g.).

Good luck. I look forward to your results, especially any problems you encounter and any suggestions for improvement.

Peter

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #247 on: December 19, 2007, 04:03:12 PM »
Dave,

To me the biggest variables in this clone which are difficult to reproduce in the home environment are 1) The sheeter 2) The oven and 3) The sauce. In regard to #1, using a rolling pin will get you very little with respect to the texture you see in the restaurant. I have even tried rolling it out super duper thin, then just folding it and pressing the layers together. The problem with the rolling pin is that you just need to make too many passes to get it thin enough, whereas with a sheeter you can be thinned out in just a few passes. The constant back and fourth movement on the rolling pin just develops the gluten structure too much. You can get "better" results by using the warm dough ball method as others have done, but it's still not quite the same. Regarding #2, the pizza in the store is almost "fried" in the pan from the grease and heat from the oven. If you look at a single topping pizza, the toppings are virtually singed. This tells me that they are cooking from the top and the bottom simultaneously, perhaps even broiling the pizza. This has me perplexed somewhat because RT never used to use conveyor ovens. In the past they used a rotating stone type oven. Regarding #3, well I think Lydia has made the most progress here. I tend to focus on crust structure and texture before taking on the beast of cloning the sauce. In terms of taste, the sauce is probably the biggest contributor to your palette though.

I tried Lydia's cheater recipe but I wasn't faithful to the recipe. I did more of a merge between what Peter put forward but spiked the flour with Harina preparada mix. The results were just okay, nothing to write home about. I will try it again with the subconscious notes that Lydia added. The nice thing about her approach is she doesn't bother with the in-home sheeting dilemma. So you can get the bubbly crust without the pain of making the layers or owning a sheeter. Peter's recipe is pretty close in flavor to the real deal. This is somewhat qualitative because I dont' have a clone of the sauce, but it was my closest attempt yet. For that one the preparation was much more involved using the Elsegundo sheeting method.

Whatever you do, don't roll it too much of you will end up with a hockey puck.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2007, 04:16:19 PM by DNA Dan »

Offline dland

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #248 on: December 19, 2007, 08:44:48 PM »
Peter,

Thanks for the helpful reply. Here is the plan, feel free to comment:

I'm going to make two 16" pizzas using the recipe listed in reply #111 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg34088.html#msg34088). I will be following the formula exactly, down to the brand of ingredients. The Carnation dry milk will be scalded according to reply #20 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg17795.html#msg17795). Since I'll be using a rolling pin, the dough will be under-mixed (just enough to combine the ingredients). The dough for the first one will be put into the refrigerator immediately after it's formed, where it will stay for about 20 hours. The dough for the second will be allowed to ferment at room temperature (around 70 F) for six hours then it will be refrigerated for about 14 hours. Both pizzas will be allowed to warm up at room temperature for 1 hour before cooking (this includes the rolling time).

The dough for both pizzas will be prepared according to reply #82 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg33883.html#msg33883) since it follows ThatOneGuy's recommendations (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg17492.html#msg17492). Both pizzas will be baked on a stone at 500 degrees for 6 to 8 minutes.

So essentially, the variable will be the room temperature fermentation time. We'll see who wins.

Dave

Okay, so experiment over and here are the results:

The first pizza (I'll call it P1) was fermented totally in the refrigerator for 19 hours. I did not notice any significant rising in the dough during fermentation. The dough retained its mealy quality until I rolled it. And it was not easy to roll. Especially when I folded it back onto itself and re-rolled it. I was pushing down so hard on my rolling pin that I could hear and feel the metal bar inside grinding on the sleeve it sits in. It took a *lot* of rolling, but when I was done, it was generally smooth with a few areas on the surface that were still gritty. I did not dock the dough. It sat at room temperature for about 1 hour before being cooked.

P1 cooked in a little less than 6 minutes. There were small to medium sized bubbles. The bottom was very crisp and crackery. The inside did have some layering and bisquity qualities, though probably not as much as an RT pizza. The dough wasn't quite moist or chewy enough either. The flavor wasn't exactly right, though not way off. It was a little salty and bready tasting. In general, P1 was a fair approximation--maybe 75%.

The second pizza (P2) was fermented at room temperature for 6 hours then set in the fridge for another 13. This dough did not rise significantly either. In fact, it appeared exactly like P1's dough. It was also quite difficult to roll. I had a lot of trouble getting the dough to elongate as I rolled it. It seemed to want to only widen. In fact, after I had already performed the "tri-fold", I was forced to fold it again (this time in half) in order to get anything resembling a square.

P2 cooked in just under 6 minutes. This pizza had many large bubbles. P2 had similar layering to P1 but was softer and more airy. It was also a bit chewier and in general, closer to RT crust. The flavor was less salty but it had a definite yeasty smell to it. The bottom was similar to P1 in crispness but had another very interesting feature--blisters. There was pronounced blistering on the bottom of P2. There was even a little on the sides. This pizza was probably about 85%-90% of a RT pizza.

P2 was the definite winner. The crust had closer flavor, texture, and appearance of RT pizza, plus blisters. To be fair, I kind of screwed up the baking of P1 because I had inadvertently turned the oven off and didn't realize it until P1 was already on the stone. So I had to take it off the stone, wait for the oven and stone to heat back up (about 5 minutes), then bake it. It was only initially on the stone for maybe 30 seconds, but this could have adversely affected blistering (or any number of things I suppose).

So I guess the findings are that room temperature fermentation makes for a pizza closer to RT, provided my gaffe with P1 didn't alter it too much. I'd be very interested to see how the user of a sheeter would alter the quality of this recipe. I have a feeling it might just close the gap and get us very close to an RT clone.

The first two pics are P2 dough, the next three are P1, and the last three are P2.

Dave
« Last Edit: December 20, 2007, 01:29:00 AM by dland »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #249 on: December 23, 2007, 12:47:17 PM »
After conducting many experiments recently with thin-crust pizzas, from which I learned a lot about that style and the principles involved, I decided to take another stab at an RT clone. The area that I most wanted to explore with that clone was the dough-rolling problem. So, after giving that problem some thought, I decided to take one of the earlier RT clone recipes (the one at Reply 82 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg33883.html#msg33883) and to modify it in two significant ways: to increase the hydration, and to use the “dough warming” method using a proofing box as described at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.0.html. I elected to use the abovementioned recipe mainly because I wanted to keep the salt level at a value (1.75%) that I have found to be workable for my palate for most pizza styles. Since I had a baker’s grade dry milk powder on hand, I also used that in lieu of the Carnation’s dry milk powder I last used. Using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, the dough formulation I ended up with was as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (52%):
IDY (0.40%):
Salt (1.75%):
Sugar (1.5%):
Baker's Non-Fat Dry Milk (1.25%):
Shortening (1.75%):
Total (158.65%):
371.46 g  |  13.1 oz | 0.82 lbs
193.16 g  |  6.81 oz | 0.43 lbs
1.49 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.49 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
6.5 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.16 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
5.57 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.4 tsp | 0.47 tbsp
4.64 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.19 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
6.5 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.63 tsp | 0.54 tbsp
589.32 g | 20.79 oz | 1.3 lbs | TF = 0.0812
Note: Harvest King flour used; nominal thickness factor = 0.08; 1.5% bowl residue compensation

As will be noted from the above formulation, the major change from the earlier formulation was in the hydration. I somewhat arbitrarily increased it from 48.3% to 52%. I wanted the change to be dramatic enough so that the changes would be pronounced and possibly point me in a better, or right, direction the next time. For purposes of using the tool, I had decided on a 14” pizza size and a thickness factor of 0.08. To get a 14” skin, I used the tool to specify the ingredients I would need to make a sheet of dough that was 16” by 16”. From that sheet, I would cut out a 14” skin, leaving about an inch on each side as scrap. I used a bowl residue compensation of 1.5% just to keep the numbers in line even though I knew I would end up with some scrap.

To prepare the dough, I put the formula water into the bowl of my KitchenAid stand mixer (with a C-hook), and I combined all of the dry ingredients in a separate bowl. The temperature of the water I used was about 100 degrees F, which I estimated would produce a finished dough temperature of around 80-85 degrees F, as specified on the bag of pizza mix that elsegundo showed in a post early on in this thread. I gradually added the dry ingredients to the mixer bowl and mixed them using the C-hook at the stir speed. I used a long, thin plastic spatula to help move the ingredients into the path of the dough hook. After about a minute or two, I added the shortening (Crisco) and incorporated that into the rest of the mix. I then kneaded the dough, at speeds 1 and 2, for about 5 minutes. Twice during the knead period, I found it necessary to stop the machine and help combine the ingredients into a cohesive ball by hand. At the end of the 5-minute knead time, I hand kneaded the dough for about another minute to get it into a smooth, round shape. The finished dough weight was 20.90 ounces, which was 0.42 ounces more than I wanted based on a 16” square sheet with a thickness factor of 0.08. So I simply trimmed away 0.42 ounces. The finished dough temperature was 81 degrees F.

At this point, I decided on another important change. Instead of forming the dough ball into a rectangular log to then go into the refrigerator, I decided to form it into a square shape. I concluded that possibly a rectangular shape would work for a large amount of dough (e.g., 25 pounds in the case of ThatOneGuy) but that the dimensions were not right for a small amount of dough. Also, since I wanted to ultimately end up with a square sheet of dough (16” by 16”), I thought it made more sense to work exclusively with a square shape and, by so doing, make the rolling out process more symmetrical. So, after placing the dough ball into a generally square-shaped plastic storage container and lightly coating it with shortening, I flattened the dough ball to conform to the shape of the storage container. I would say that the dough piece was about 2” thick. The dough at this stage can be seen in the first photo below. The dough went into the refrigerator, where it stayed for just short of two days, which is the maximum mentioned by ThatOneGuy.

Upon removing the dough piece from the refrigerator, I placed it into my proofing box. A photo of that proofing box is shown at Reply 69 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg49752.html#msg49752. I set the proofing box to about 115-120 degrees F (using the thermometer to tell me the temperature) and allowed the dough, still within its container, to warm up for about two hours.

Whereas the dough had not risen noticeably while in the refrigerator (as ThatOneGuy said would be the case), it rose by about 15% while in the proofing box. I gently removed the dough piece from its container so that it would retain its square shape and put it onto my well-floured work surface. I pressed the dough with my fingers to flatten it as much as possible and, using my tapered wood rolling pin dusted with flour, I then rolled out the dough to a 16” square—rolling from top to bottom and side to side with smooth rhythmic actions so that the skin would have a uniform thickness. I had no problems whatsoever rolling out the skin to this point since the dough was warm and soft. I then dusted the top surface of the skin with a small amount of bench flour and folded the right side of the skin to the center of the skin, which was followed by folding over the left half of the skin over the other half. This is the 1/3-2/3 method previously described by ThatOneGuy and, I believe, is similar to what elsegundo uses. After dusting the exposed surfaces with more bench flour, I repeated this 1/3-2/3 sequence but in the other direction—vertically from top to bottom (i.e., from top to center and bottom to center). This left me with a square piece of dough with multiple layers—more, I believe, than what ThatOneGuy described.  The dough at this point had a shape like the dough piece shown in the first photo but it was in layers, not a single unitary piece. 

I then rolled out this new square piece of dough. This time, the rolling out process was more labored because the dough was fairly stiff and the layers wanted to slide rather than roll out. However, I found that letting the dough rest from time to time--for even a few seconds--made it easier to roll out. As an extemporaneous experiment, I also found that docking the dough piece as I rolled it out seemed to make the dough easier to roll out. I didn’t want to overuse this method and possibly alter the final outcome of the dough in an unintended way, but it occurred to me that it might be something to explore more fully in a future experiment. I also found that when the dough got to about 12” square, the rest of the rolling process went more smoothly and more quickly. The second photo below (without the flash) shows the rolled out dough. From the 16” square sheet of dough, which I first docked using my dough docker, I used my cutter pan as a template to cut out a skin of 14”. Based on the weight of the 14” skin (13.80 ounces), I calculated that its thickness factor was 0.089524. The third photo below (without flash) shows the docked 14” skin.

I decided at this point to put the skin back into the refrigerator (as ThatOneGuy mentioned as one of the alternatives), with the intention of using it later in the day. To prepare the skin for the refrigerator, I dusted both sides of the skin with bench flour and folded it into quarters, which I then encased in plastic wrap before putting it into the refrigerator. This is a method I used successfully with the cracker-style skins I made in recent weeks. The fourth photo below shows the skin as it went back into the refrigerator. The skin remained in the refrigerator for 4 hours. When I removed the skin from the refrigerator, I saw that it had shrunk a bit (which is something I had also experienced with the cracker-style doughs). So, I rolled it out a bit and, to be on the safe side, I re-docked it. I decided not to let the skin warm up before using. The skin went directly into my 14” dark, anodized perforated cutter pan from pizzatools.com that I had lightly brushed with a light olive oil (in lieu of a spray that ThatOneGuy mentioned). I have a dark, anodized perforated disk that I could have used in lieu of the cutter pan, and I might try using that disk sometime, but I wanted to see if I could place the cheeses and toppings out to the edge without their falling off, and the side edges of the cutter pan appeared to offer that possibility. To carry out this objective, I pushed the dough up the sides of the cutter pan so that it would form a rim. Doing this had the effect of reducing the thickness factor to a bit over 0.08, which was the initial targeted number. The fifth photo below shows the perforated cutter pan I used. 

I dressed the skin in the cutter pan using a 3:1:1 ratio of shredded mozzarella cheese (Best Choice low-moisture, part-skim), Provolone cheese (Stella), and medium cheddar cheese (Kraft); a 6-in-1 sauce with a wide variety of herbs and spices chosen more or less at random from my spice rack and microwaved using November’s microwave-assisted extraction method; partially-cooked hot Italian sausage (Safeway house sausage); diced green peppers; sliced raw onion; and Hormel pepperoni slices. I baked the pizza on the lowest oven rack position of my oven that I had preheated to 500 degrees F. After about 8 or 9 minutes, I moved the pizza (still in the cutter pan) to the uppermost oven rack position for an additional 2 minutes, also at 500 degrees F.

The photos in the next post show the finished pizza. I thought that it was exceptional. It wasn’t especially cracker-like and it wasn’t overly crispy, but the crust was crispy at the edges and randomly elsewhere. The center was soft and a bit chewy, and I could see distinct layers when I tried to peel back the crust. I tried to show this--but not particularly artfully--in one of the photos below. The crust coloration was good and there were bubbles here and there but not big enough to constitute eruptions.

Since I have never had an RT pizza, I have no idea of what I created. However, I would be hard pressed to imagine how an authentic RT pizza could be much better than the one I made. It was a great pizza.

Peter
« Last Edit: December 23, 2007, 07:58:22 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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