Author Topic: How to clean and/or season steel plates  (Read 2022 times)

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Offline dbarneschi

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How to clean and/or season steel plates
« on: May 13, 2012, 12:19:39 PM »
So I finally pulled the trigger and bought a steel plate - 18" X 22" and 1/2" thick. $70 plus tax. A bit pricey, I know, but oh well. The plate looks to be in good shape. However, when I rub my finger across it, an oily black soot rubs off. Does the plate need to be cleaned prior to use and, if so, how should I go about doing so? Also, should it be seasoned? Thanks in advance for the tips!


buceriasdon

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2012, 12:43:39 PM »
In extreme cases I've used a paint solvent and rags followed up with a scrubbing with a grease cutting soap and rinsed well and dryed with rags. Soap and water then rinsed well, dried should do it. There is no need to season it unless you live in the rust belt or by salt air, which i do so I always season my plates but if kept dry rust shouldn't be a problem. Pizza baking is quite different than frying in say a cast iron skillet or a carbon steel wok, the seasoning creates a nonstick surface.
Don

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2012, 01:00:20 PM »
In extreme cases I've used a paint solvent and rags followed up with a scrubbing with a grease cutting soap and rinsed well and dryed with rags. Soap and water then rinsed well, dried should do it. There is no need to season it unless you live in the rust belt or by salt air, which i do so I always season my plates but if kept dry rust shouldn't be a problem. Pizza baking is quite different than frying in say a cast iron skillet or a carbon steel wok, the seasoning creates a nonstick surface.
Don

Sound advice. Thanks. I think I'll skip the paint solvent and proceed right to the grease cutting soap.

Offline getchai

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2012, 01:49:05 PM »
I picked up a plate today and have the same problem. I've been washing it for a bit and it never seems to end. There is a layer of silver at the bottom which I can see because there are some scratches. Should the entire plate be that silver? I was already worried about the safety of cooking on it and now that I can't seem to get all the black stuff off I am even more worried. I don't want that "stuff" getting into my food.

:edit: I've read the black is black oxide. The best way to remove it is using diluted muriatic acid (HCl). Though I have some of that about 20 miles away, I'd rather find an alternative.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2012, 02:26:14 PM by getchai »

scott123

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2012, 03:19:19 PM »
Sand it.  An orbital sander would work, but if the layer is thin, sand it by hand.  Just be careful to apply even pressure so the plate stays flat.

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2012, 11:14:48 AM »
I've been reading more about black oxide and I need to ask the question: Did anybody SERIOUSLY look into the safety of working with a plate that has (had) been coated in black oxide? I know now that the black oxide is supposed to be removed from the plate prior to use, but the possibility of even having trace amounts of this stuff left over on the plate when baking really scares me (especially when working at the temps that we do). http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20111207133758AAJGlUe

buceriasdon

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2012, 12:11:08 PM »
First off, it is not black oxide, technically speaking it is blue oxide and except for any loose scale hot rolled blue oxide is inert. The hot roll process exposes the surface to oxygen in the air creating an oxide layer that is pressed into the surface. It can only be removed through either mechanical abrasion or acid stripping. Many on this forum use blued mild steel pans with no ill effects. The truth is blued mild steel is a temporary manufacturing process to reduce the chance of rust, iron oxide forming on the surface.
Don

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: How to clean and/or season steel plates
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2012, 08:12:09 PM »
First off, it is not black oxide, technically speaking it is blue oxide and except for any loose scale hot rolled blue oxide is inert. The hot roll process exposes the surface to oxygen in the air creating an oxide layer that is pressed into the surface. It can only be removed through either mechanical abrasion or acid stripping. Many on this forum use blued mild steel pans with no ill effects. The truth is blued mild steel is a temporary manufacturing process to reduce the chance of rust, iron oxide forming on the surface.
Don

Ah, I see. Thanks for the clarification.


 

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