Author Topic: cookware  (Read 4860 times)

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Offline apizza

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cookware
« on: September 25, 2005, 04:53:13 PM »
I'm looking for some help selecting a brand of cookware that is not at the upper end. All Clad is out of my reach. The last 8 qt Farberware stockpot we bought is not flat on the bottom and takes forever to heat on our electric stove. The only contact with the electric element is the outer edge. Bottom concave when checked with a straight edge.  OK for gas not electric.

So any suggestions on something decent at a reasonable price? I'm sure you all have your favorites and I'm looking for comments.


Offline scott r

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Re: cookware
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2005, 02:05:17 AM »
Apizza,  Although I am a big fan of my Calphalon and Circulon pieces, they are right up there in the All Clad price range.   I can say that all of my cookware by these company's has seen constant use for 12 years and is still are going strong!  I use my nonstick (Circulon) and my stick resistant, or simply annodised aluminum (Calphalon) pieces about 50/50. 

I have seen a budget line of cookware at Costco under the Kirkland name that is obviously a copy of Calphalon but with a true non stick coating like Circulon.   I think they also have a copy of All Clad that they call Tri Clad or something.  I have not used these pieces, but they appear to be made just like the real thing.  You can get a whole set for $200 or less.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: cookware
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2005, 04:39:42 AM »

I use my nonstick (Circulon) and my stick resistant, or simply annodised aluminum (Calphalon) pieces about 50/50. 


Scott brings up a really important point: non-stick vs. uncoated. For many years I bought into the Dupont marketing hype and owned entire sets of Teflon-coated pots and pans. Only recently did I come to the conclusion that it is very easy to cook on high-quality stainless steel without things sticking, it is easy to clean up, and it lasts forever as opposed to non-stick coatings which, without fail, begin to chip off over time. There are some studies that show that Teflon at high-temp releases gases which aren't healthy.

But more importantly, food just comes out better in stainless steel, from fried eggs to seared meats. Frond is a magical thing. I still keep a few Teflon pieces for things like crepes, but use my All-Clad for just about everything else. Oh, I do have a cheap 18" carbon-steel wok that gets used more than any other piece, buts that's another story.

I haven't tried cooking on annodized aluminum.

Bill/SFNM

« Last Edit: September 26, 2005, 04:41:25 AM by Bill/SFNM »

Offline naschol

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Re: cookware
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2006, 02:36:22 PM »
I bought some All-Clad and then I bought some Wolfgang Puck Bistro.  To me, they are identical in performance and cleanability.  Since WP is much less expensive, I bought more of that.  You can get nice sets and open stock at www.hsn.com and also, sets can be picked up at Sam's Club.

I really prefer the stainless to Teflon in everything, except scrambled eggs...

Nancy

Offline mmarston

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Re: cookware
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2006, 03:51:10 PM »
Try Amazon.com for ocassional sales on brand names. I recently got a huge Calphalon anodized saucier for $30!!! The anodized aluminum browns better than stainless but you have to treat it more gently. The Williams Sonoma Outlet stores can have good deals as well. Last year I got a Calphalon stainless stock pot with pasta and steamer inserts for $60. The good brands have lifetime warrrenties. I have returned 2 pans after long and hard use to Calphalon and had them replaced no questions. Same thing for knives. I dropped a Wustof knife and the tip broke. Replaced!! and they even sent the broken one back with the replacment.  I was able to grind a new tip on it and make it useful again.

Michael
« Last Edit: January 03, 2006, 04:05:11 PM by mmarston »
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Offline PizzaDanPizzaMan

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Re: cookware
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2006, 11:42:19 PM »
apizza,
We have/use both stainless steel and coated cookware. I agree with Bill, I would much rather cook on good stainless than anything else. Our coated stuff is Millenium and we have had it for about 10-12 years and it is still useable. But about 5 years ago we bought a set of stainless from Sams of all places. It is an Italian make branded Tramontina. It is excellent quality, very heavy and durable. It is also quite attractive with a brilliant mirror finish on the outside. If you have access to a Sams Club I would highly suggest you have a look at these. They were also quite reasonably priced. I believe we got a complete set for somewhere around $300.00.

This link shows the set we bought at Sams. I don't know however if they still carry them.

http://www.125west.com/Tramontina_Kitchen_Cookware_Professional_Gourmet_Stainless_Steel_Cookware_Sets_cookware.html

Offline apizza

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Re: cookware
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2006, 08:03:35 PM »
Well I thank you for all the replies. Let me give you an update on my Farberware.
 
When I posted in late September I also emailed Farberware with my problem. Then I forgot about it. Much to my surprise I received a reply in mid December. They offered suggestions, or I could send the pot back for evaluation. I sent it back with a letter and drawing explaining the concave bottom. I also include an article about saving energy from the local paper. Flat bottom pots were mentioned as a way to cut costs.
This week I received a new Farberware Classic 8qt stockpot. A straightedge test showed the same concave bottom. So I guess that's how they are designed. Believe me they are not for a traditional electric stove. I don't care how much aluminum you encase in stainless, it's got to hit the element.

So off I go with your suggestions in mind and a straight edge in my pocket.

Offline buzz

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Re: cookware
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2006, 11:19:04 AM »
I would get 18/10 stainless steel. You might want to try an Ultrex pan from HSN (catch the chanell when the owner is demonstrating cookware)--they manufacture cookware for a lot of the biggies and sell the Ultrex name at greatly reduced prices.

Meijer sells their own line of 18/10 pans, if you have one in your area.

I can't recommned the Kirkland brand of non-stick--the pans warp and the coating wears out too fast.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2006, 11:20:48 AM by buzz »

Offline SouthernPete

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Re: cookware
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2006, 06:45:12 PM »
If you cook on a electric range do not get all-clad, when you cook with high heat the pans tend to warp....all in all I say they are to expensive and overrated.

Offline scott r

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Re: cookware
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2006, 08:31:13 PM »
Calphalon can hold up to the highest heat I can muster out of my home stove/oven.  The added bonus is the cast iron handles that let you go from stovetop to oven.  I often use this technique to pan sear meats, then bake.


Offline beckysuea

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Re: cookware
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2006, 08:41:44 PM »
I use QVC Techniques/Cooks Essentials hard anodized cookware.   I use their grill pan to fry steaks, sear both sides at high heat and then put everything in a 450 degree oven that has been preheating for about an hour and finish cooking the steaks.   These cookware is rated up to 500 degree oven.   I have used this grill pan for at least a year, about 3 times a month, in the oven at this degrees.   So far no damage.    I also put the pan in the dishwasher to clean which is not recommended on a lot of the nonstick pans.

Offline Les

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Re: cookware
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2006, 11:04:35 AM »
I use QVC Techniques/Cooks Essentials hard anodized cookware.   I use their grill pan to fry steaks, sear both sides at high heat and then put everything in a 450 degree oven that has been preheating for about an hour and finish cooking the steaks.   These cookware is rated up to 500 degree oven.   I have used this grill pan for at least a year, about 3 times a month, in the oven at this degrees.   So far no damage.    I also put the pan in the dishwasher to clean which is not recommended on a lot of the nonstick pans.


I am devoted All Clad stainless man myself, but like you I am a fan of anodized aluminum, especially grill pans.  One of the best All Clad bargains around is their 12 inch grill pan at $50 seen here:  http://www.cutleryandmore.com/details.asp?SKU=556  It's one of my favorite pans.


 

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