Author Topic: Pizza Inn style  (Read 7954 times)

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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2012, 05:06:50 PM »
I'd love for you to.  Deep, deep, inside I am a cracker crust addict.
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Offline aawshads

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2012, 09:25:05 AM »
Then I can buy you lunch at Pie Five sometime  :)
I always laugh as I deliver a few homemade pizzas over to my wife at Orthofix next door.
My wife says thanks for the Pizza Inn pizza, like I said she is a big fan. :chef:

That is funny, when we were in the concept testing phase with Pie Five we had Orthofix employees come over to lunch every day for a week and order from our mock line to test how it would work.  I probably fed her and did not even know it. 

Offline DocSpine

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2012, 12:26:32 PM »
Yep she went over for that. I think its funny Google shows a restaurant at that location. How many people knock on the door looking for it?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2012, 12:43:24 PM »


The Thin crust is distintive, and I know of no products that duplicate it on the market.  I have seen several recipes that come out similar though.  


OK, would you mind pointing me in the direction of the recipe you feel comes out most similar? Thank you!
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline aawshads

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #24 on: June 29, 2012, 04:07:16 PM »
The recipes will never be quite the same because the flours you can buy in stores are different than what most chain pizza places use, plus there are ingredients you cannot buy anywhere (I have tried).  When you have the flour blended for you you can get very specific with protein and moisture content and many other specs depending on the type of crust desired.  

Try the Dough doctors Recipe you see on here, increase the oil to 6%, add .05 % sugar and mix.  It will be fairly dry slightly crumbly.   Don't refrigerate it, put it in a bowl or small bucket with plenty of room and seal for 6 hours at room temp.  When you open it it will smell of yeast and slight alcohol. form some into a hockey puck and Roll it out to not quite 1/8th of an inch and put it in your pan. Cover and Let it proof for 30 minutes.  top and bake in oven as hot as you can get it until top is brown and crust is crispy.  We all know every oven is different so you will have to experiment to find the temp/time that works.
 Should yield a very usable product.

Dough Dr recipe

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17996.0.html


« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 04:10:30 PM by aawshads »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #25 on: June 29, 2012, 04:29:36 PM »
aawshads,

Very nice, thank you sir.

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #26 on: June 29, 2012, 04:37:10 PM »
aawshads,

Very nice, thank you sir.

Bob
+1
Helluva nice thing to do.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline DocSpine

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #27 on: June 29, 2012, 07:18:41 PM »
Way nice thanks!
"plus there are ingredients you cannot buy anywhere"  my mind just screams, so many questions.......


I am stuck on trying the pretzel crust challenge from  a while back, you ever try to dip a pizza crust into lye? You ever seen what it does to your trays lol.
Thanks for the hints on the crusts. Trying it this weekend.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 07:23:31 PM by DocSpine »

Offline Zing

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #28 on: June 29, 2012, 08:10:00 PM »
Doc,

I presume the "ingredients you cannot buy anywhere" are those made by industrial food ingredient manufacturers and only sold in large quantities business-to-business. I am working to clone Shakey's Pizza  and have become convinced the dough mix contain ingredients that do not have to be declared on the label just like pink slime does not have to be declared on the labels of beef products.

Once restaurants start using ingredients you can't buy from a supermarket or foodservice distributor, it presents new challenges that I still have not figured out how to overcome.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #29 on: June 29, 2012, 09:22:49 PM »
Quit trying to imitate factory food.....I am only kidding a little bit.


Offline DocSpine

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2012, 12:35:26 PM »
Not trying to recreate "factory food". Trying to recreate memories.  We are all trying to recreate something on this board be it Pizza Inn or a small villa in Tuscany's neo pizza.
Some days I would rather have a cracker thin Pizza Inn pizza than a (putting on flame suit) wood fired Neo pizza. But I grew up on Pizza Inn and Marrians Pizza in Ohio.
Guess I will never be admitted to the pizza snob society meetings now. :-D :angel: >:D

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #31 on: June 30, 2012, 04:43:40 PM »
Pizza Inn in the 1970s wasn't factory food, it was dough made with flour, water, salt, yeast, and oil. It was commissary but not pre-mixed.  It was the best crust there is, and my uncle makes it still  (and I try).

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2012, 04:54:08 PM »
If you ever find yourself in Lafayette Louisiana, visit his restaurant and enjoy some 1970's Pizza Inn thin crust.  He cooks it in a WFO at low temps and the toppings are more Roman than American, but the crust is exactly as he has been making it for the last 40 years.


Offline account

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2012, 06:10:35 PM »
Pizza Inn in the 1970s wasn't factory food, it was dough made with flour, water, salt, yeast, and oil. It was commissary but not pre-mixed.  It was the best crust there is, and my uncle makes it still  (and I try).

Do you have a recipe you can share?

Offline sotaboy

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Re: Pizza Inn style
« Reply #34 on: July 01, 2012, 08:39:39 PM »
ok, tried a combo of dr dough and aawshads.

Dough
Flour (100%):    170.66 g  |  6.02 oz | 0.38 lbs
Water (45%):    76.8 g  |  2.71 oz | 0.17 lbs
IDY (.6%):    1.02 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.34 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):    2.99 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
Olive Oil (6%):    10.24 g | 0.36 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.28 tsp | 0.76 tbsp
Honey (1%):    1.71 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.24 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
Total (154.35%):   263.41 g | 9.29 oz | 0.58 lbs | TF = 0.07
This is for a 13 inch pizza, but I crimped the edges to make it 12 inch.

Mixing:  I did it by hand, put water, honey. and IDY in a mixing bowl, waited 10 minutes, then added salt and oil. Added flour ( I used GM Better for Bread) about a half cup at a time, stirring with spoon, until the dough became too dense. Put the rest of the flour in, and  hand kneaded for about 6 minutes, til the flour was incorporated.
Put a little oil in a plastic container, covered ball in oil, covered container and let rise for 6 hours at room temp.

Baking:  Rolled to size I wanted, with a rolling pin. Used a little semolina flour while rolling.
Used a perforated anodized pan. Oven @ 450, pizza on bottom shelf. Rotated, of course.

This may not be a truly cracker style, because of the thickness. But this is the best thincrust I've ever made.


 

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