Author Topic: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza  (Read 35491 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline frasier

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #40 on: January 25, 2006, 09:33:08 PM »
Les,

You said you have a dedicated pizza oven that reaches 650 degrees F. Can I ask what make and model it is? And would you recommend it?
I'm going to Publix tomorrow to look for grape tomatoes!

Thanks


Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2006, 03:13:43 AM »
Hi Frasier,

I have a Bakers Pride 16 inch oven.  I can recommend it, highly.  You can see it here: http://www.valiantequipment.com/mopxhe3elcod1.html

The only "catch" is, you need to put a pizza stone on the wire bake deck to get that charred crust we all love.  The best solution is to get the thinnest pizza stone you find and have it  custom cut for your oven, such as you see here:  http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php

Good luck!

Offline Hi Gluten

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 48
  • This is how you make Swiss Cheese, not Mozz!
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2006, 05:51:29 PM »
Les,

I have the same oven. Only it's brand name is Wisco. When I need to use a stone, I use the ubiquitous unglazed red quarry tiles from Home Depot. For under $10 you have enough to do two or more ovens. They're quite thin. The only drawback is that you have to be careful when taking the pie off the rack. You wouldn't want any of those hot tiles to fall off.  >:D

Generally, I use a pan or screen with the oven and get very good results.

Offline Perk

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Jacksonville
  • Dreams of Pizza!
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2006, 11:02:25 AM »
A very good detailed tutorial on your pizza.
It looks superb!
The time you spend on your pizza is amazing.
I also read recently in a book a recipe for using really cold water.
I think it was the 60 pizza recipe book.
your pizza looks very good indeed!

One thing about your dough, did you try and make both honey doughs again?
If so did you get the same results.

The reason I ask, is you never know something could go wrong in your dough and when you compare doughs
you have to get a even median. That way 2 times is more of a test.

I have not tried honey in the dough yet. I like my dough a little sweet so I may have too soon.





« Last Edit: January 30, 2006, 11:04:41 AM by Perk »
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #44 on: January 31, 2006, 11:27:06 AM »
The time you spend on your pizza is amazing.

The sauce is the biggest time-effort hog, but to be accurate, I make enough for 20 pizzas in one weekend afternoon. So given the number of pizzas I get out of the effort I don't think it is really as bad as it might seem.  The dough too mostly sits around for two days; the extra time required for using ice to make it is only slightly more than normal dough.


One thing about your dough, did you try and make both honey doughs again?
If so did you get the same results.  The reason I ask, is you never know something could go wrong in your dough and when you compare doughs
you have to get a even median. That way 2 times is more of a test.

I tried it twice only, with just my wife and I tasting, and we thought we could tell the difference.  As you (and Peter) point out, that is not the best science (even if I think the idea of using enzymatic action for pizza dough is theoretically sound, and certainly well-proven in bread making).  I did, however, experiment with many doughs striving for certain qualities.  As I argued to Peter (in a PM), my taste buds became very sensitive to subtle changes.  I noticed, for example, that adding over 5% honey really did (just as Peter predicted) make the dough's added sweetness noticeable (something I didn't want). 

Right now, after using this recipe many times, I am not even close to being ready to try something new.  I totally love it and am not the slightest bit tired of it.

Offline thatonegirl

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 30
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #45 on: June 06, 2008, 01:04:22 PM »
Hi Les!

Not sure if you're still around on the forum, but just wanted to give you a shout out! Sebastopol is my hometown and I thank you for the beautiful pictures of the fog and vineyards you posted! *sigh*  :)
Your pizza looks amazing too!

One question; my favorite pizzeria in Sebastopol is Mary's Pizza Shack on Gravenstein Highway. I remember sitting at the counter and watching them twirl the dough high in the air in anticipation for our pizza. Have you ever tried to duplicate their dough or happened to run across a copycat form of it? I would LOVE it!!!

Thanks!

Online Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3065
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #46 on: August 24, 2010, 10:54:35 PM »
To answer some questions on this old thread.  The amount of water that is capable of being absorbed as well as the amount of heat that it is capable of generating is directly related to the surface area of the materials being mixed.  A high surface area material, like finely milled flour, has an immense amount of surface area.  This will both allow it to absorb a high amount of water relative to it's volume, and will also increase the amount of heat it can absorb as well as decrease the time it takes to do so.

For a given volume of material then, you get the following:

The higher the surface area, the more liquid it can absorb.
The higher the surface area, the quicker it will hydrate, given sufficient liquid to do so.
The higher the surface area, the more heat can be generated per unit of volume.
The higher the surface area, the more heat can be absorbed per unit of volume.

I do not know the specific surface area of any particular flour, but iron oxide pigments fall into the same approximate range of 20-80 nanometers particle size.  Iron oxides in this range have a surface area around 6-12 square meters per gram, so a typical 300 gram amount of flour would have a median of around 6/10ths of an ACRE of surface area in that little ball of dough you mash out into an 11" round pizza crust.

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20251
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #47 on: August 26, 2010, 12:19:48 PM »
Les,

I wanted to let you know I think your Sebastopol Sweet Sauce is the best I have ever tasted, with your recipe found at Reply #5 and continuing from there. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1931.msg17063.html#msg17063

I have tried you recipe with 6 in 1 sauce, my regular sauce I use for my small market pizza stand and now with Great Value crushed tomatoes.  I am growing my tomatoes and have used all kinds of varieties in making your sauce.  I think it comes out great each time. 

Thanks for taking the time to post your recipe.  :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #48 on: December 05, 2010, 01:48:59 PM »
Les,

I wanted to let you know I think your Sebastopol Sweet Sauce is the best I have ever tasted, with your recipe found at Reply #5 and continuing from there. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1931.msg17063.html#msg17063

I have tried you recipe with 6 in 1 sauce, my regular sauce I use for my small market pizza stand and now with Great Value crushed tomatoes.  I am growing my tomatoes and have used all kinds of varieties in making your sauce.  I think it comes out great each time. 

Thanks for taking the time to post your recipe.  :)

Norma


Thank you for the kind words, I am happy someone gave it a try.  Pete predicted it was too labor intensive for most to attempt, but I've since found ways to do the same thing much more efficiently.  I will try to post those amendments.

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3263
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #49 on: December 05, 2010, 02:09:11 PM »
Les,

I just came across this thread and must say that it is most impressive. I admire your diligence and comprehensive approach with a specific goal in mind.

I live in Sausalito, my girlfriend in Santa Rosa so I am very familiar with Sebastopol and Sonoma County itself. It's a great place.

I will have to try your recipe and see how it turns out for me. Thanks for a great post!
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20251
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #50 on: December 05, 2010, 02:10:21 PM »
Thank you for the kind words, I am happy someone gave it a try.  Pete predicted it was too labor intensive for most to attempt, but I've since found ways to do the same thing much more efficiently.  I will try to post those amendments.

Les,

I have made your sauce so many times with my tomatoes from my garden this past summer.  I would rate your sauce as the very best, whether for pizza, pasta, or even a sauce for sausage or meatballs.  I congratulate you on your posting this fine sauce!  ;D  Even when your sauce is defrosted from the freezer, it still tastes great.

I don't think your method is hard at all.  

I will be anxious to see your new amendments, when you have time to post them.  :)

Thanks,

Norma
« Last Edit: December 05, 2010, 02:12:13 PM by norma427 »
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline fireman117

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 63
  • Location: Milwaukee, WI
Re: Les' Sebastopol "Sweet" Pizza
« Reply #51 on: January 13, 2011, 06:20:47 PM »
Les,

Just found this thread while looking for a sauce recipie. So much to explore here!

Your sauce looks incredible, and I'm going to give it a try. It's been a real weak spot for me. I can't seem to get right. But, I've suspected there is anise, or maybe fennel? in some of the local pizza joints sauce that I like around here. THAT, might be the missing link!

I don't have a food mill, is there another common kitchen utensil like a colander that might work for straining?

I'll let you all know how it comes out. And when I get a little better at this I'll try the crust. Your whole pie looks great but one thing at a time.

Thanks,
Eric


 

pizzapan