Author Topic: Prosciutto Di Parma.  (Read 268 times)

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Offline Gosseni

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Prosciutto Di Parma.
« on: July 14, 2014, 12:33:37 PM »
Nice to be able to import higher quality Prosciutto from Italy.
Kicks up that Prosciutto and Arugula technique a notch.



Online Donjo911

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 03:47:56 PM »
I viewed it just after you posted it.  I thought I'd wait to see what others would say first.


I'll just come right out with it:  Jealous of not only the Prosciutto Di Parma whole IN YOUR KITCHEN.  That's awesome in, and of itself.  But sakes man! You have the proper stand/cutter too.  Like I said - jealous. :o
Few great accomplishments are achieved single-handedly, Most have their Norgays.
How do you spot a Norgay?
You start with the people with the funny names.

Offline Gosseni

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 06:27:51 PM »
The USA finally eliminated the ban on importing these products. So getting them here affordably has never been easier. Salumeria.... Prosciutto.... All of it is a phone call or website away. That ham came in about 1/2  what you would pay per pound for equivalent quality. All good. So no need to be jealous. If I can do it anyone can. I hauled the holder back from Carrera. It took a while to get the slicing technique down. But it is worth it now. Thanks Donjo. Cheers.

Online Donjo911

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 11:43:10 AM »
The USA finally eliminated the ban on importing these products. So getting them here affordably has never been easier. Salumeria.... Prosciutto.... All of it is a phone call or website away. That ham came in about 1/2  what you would pay per pound for equivalent quality. All good. So no need to be jealous. If I can do it anyone can. I hauled the holder back from Carrera. It took a while to get the slicing technique down. But it is worth it now. Thanks Donjo. Cheers.


Thank you for your reply. I'm sorry my follow up is delayed - I neglected to "follow this topic" after sending the message - which now I am.  I am curious if you need to take any special care in storage (climate/temp/humidity) once at your home. Perhaps especially in the summer months.  Any advice you may have would be appreciated!
Few great accomplishments are achieved single-handedly, Most have their Norgays.
How do you spot a Norgay?
You start with the people with the funny names.

Offline Gosseni

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 05:02:52 PM »
Absolutely. Simple refrigeration works just fine. I wrap the ham with plastic wrap then a layer of foil. I have a party fridge out in the garage that has a produce drawer that will hold the leftover product. Keep that drawer at the driest setting. I bring the ham out a few hours before serving to get it to room temp. Slices better. Further... The top part of the ham that you last cut will be a little dry. So I level it back out to get to the good stuff just under that area. Keeps for months. Does not last that long though. Party on!

Online Donjo911

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #5 on: Today at 12:46:20 AM »
Fantastic!  Thanks for the guidance! Yum!
Few great accomplishments are achieved single-handedly, Most have their Norgays.
How do you spot a Norgay?
You start with the people with the funny names.

Offline apizza

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #6 on: Today at 08:28:28 AM »
There is an article in my local paper today about the over trimming of prosciutto. I found a copy here.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/food/sc-food-0620-prosciutto-20140621,0,6371920.story

I have not seen this at my local Italian deli but wonder if the big stores do this. I wish other people would stop making my health decisions.
Marty
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #7 on: Today at 08:37:10 AM »
Interesting. At my local store, they act all put out when you ask them to trim off the inedible rind. Needless to say, leaving the fat is not a problem.  :-D
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline jeff v

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #8 on: Today at 11:52:39 AM »
Interesting. At my local store, they act all put out when you ask them to trim off the inedible rind. Needless to say, leaving the fat is not a problem.  :-D

It's too bad it's so hard to find a deli that understands and treats the food right. There is a new chain of "high end" grocery stores near me so in the name of convenience I strayed and bought some prosciutto. 18.99/lb and she shoved in a plastic deli bag. I refused it. My local Italian specialty store knows how to slice and wrap gently in paper. My son loves mortadella and while it's not prosciutto expensive they still slice and wrap it correctly.

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #9 on: Today at 12:08:06 PM »
It's too bad it's so hard to find a deli that understands and treats the food right. There is a new chain of "high end" grocery stores near me so in the name of convenience I strayed and bought some prosciutto. 18.99/lb and she shoved in a plastic deli bag. I refused it. My local Italian specialty store knows how to slice and wrap gently in paper. My son loves mortadella and while it's not prosciutto expensive they still slice and wrap it correctly.
They`re jus jealous because in order for them to eat $18/lb deli meats they have to steal it!   >:D
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Online shuboyje

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #10 on: Today at 12:09:55 PM »
Mine is about to come out of the curing chamber.  I need to find a slicing setup like that.
-Jeff

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #11 on: Today at 12:38:03 PM »
Jeff, did you build your curing chamber with a fan? If so, do you keep it running all the time or shut it off from time-to-time. Do you change direction of flow? I'm wondering if simulating natural wind conditions experienced over a lengthy open-air curing process in beneficial?
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Online stonecutter

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Online Donjo911

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Re: Prosciutto Di Parma.
« Reply #13 on: Today at 04:30:09 PM »
Mine is about to come out of the curing chamber.  I need to find a slicing setup like that.



This company seems to have a few nice options.  http://www.costanteimports.com.au/category/butcher-supplies/prosciutto-holders/186
Few great accomplishments are achieved single-handedly, Most have their Norgays.
How do you spot a Norgay?
You start with the people with the funny names.


 

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