Author Topic: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana  (Read 547 times)

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Offline jomo_eng

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Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« on: January 22, 2015, 04:42:57 PM »
I am in the early design process of making my pizza oven.  I got a little ahead of myself as you can see in the picture and started digging out some dirt to frame up.  Even after I started digging my plan changed.  I went from a square base to a round base design in my mind. 

The overall plan is for a Neapolitan style pizza oven.  I have taken design ideas from a few threads.  I am thinking about a base similar to the one found in this thread:
http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/8/42-pompeii-s-louisiana-18910-19.html

The idea would be to replace the round metal stand used by most Neapolitan oven builders, with a concrete and brick round base.  I am mainly looking at using the rounded part of the brick base, in the above thread, without the square front.

For the Oven itself I am inspired by the following thread:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22618.200.html

I never saw any finished pictures of the Swedish oven but the design and building pictures were great.

My current design plans are fluid but are coming together.  I am looking at a 42" cooking floor.  I am planning for 4.5" (x2) of soldier bricks.  This will be buttressed by 4"(x2) of refractory insulating concrete. The insulating concrete will be covered with 2" (x2) of ceramic insulating blanket.  I will cover the insulating blanket with another 1" (x2) of refractory insulating concrete.  Finally there will be 1" (x2) of stucco and then tiles.  All the numbers here besides the floor must be doubled to cover each side.  This gives us a total diameter of roughly 68.5 inches (including a small allowance for tile). 

With a 68.5" oven width I am figuring I want a base supporting diameter of 70" which will then have another couple of inches of finishing brick. 

If someone could review my math and the planned size of my round base, it would be appreciated.

I have really enjoyed reading a number of threads here and hope to be a part of the brick oven community in the next 6-9 months.

I am planning to use Whitacre Greer Light Duty Fire Brick.  This seems to be the best available in the Monroe, Louisiana area.  I have not found a medium duty Alsey here.  The only other choice seems to be Elgin and they do not get good reviews from what I see here and on other forums.  I am looking at ordering my Ceramic Fiber Blanket and boards from either Forno Bravo or McGill's Warehouse.  I may have a local source but we have not come to an agreement on price as they are not a wholesaler and are more of a company that installs refractory material.  I am looking at using heat stop 50 or forno bravo refractory mortar.  I will likely make my own refractory insulating concrete using vermiculite.

I am open to suggestions on anything from design to materials.  I have a bunch of other home projects that will be intertwined in this build.  Its a new home so I need to lay about 20 pallets of sod.  I also need to install a fence and gate on my paver patio to protect the kids from going in the water and I need to hang curtains and rods on my overhanging patio.  Needless to say, this will be a busy spring/summer.

Thanks for any advice in advance.

Thanks,
Joe



Online TXCraig1

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2015, 04:52:13 PM »
I never saw any finished pictures of the Swedish oven but the design and building pictures were great.

Here you go: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,30398.msg316853.html#msg316853
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline jomo_eng

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2015, 05:36:39 PM »
Here you go: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,30398.msg316853.html#msg316853

That came out great. I have already been using my limited geometry skills to extrapolate your oven opening, flue dimensions to my oven based on both oven floor size difference and outside oven diameter differences. No need to make final decisions on that this early but I am looking at it.

I used the following thread to get your dimensions. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26441.40.html

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2015, 05:43:54 PM »
That is an amazingly important thread.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2015, 10:55:36 PM »
It is, but there are some peccadilloes that need to be noted.  They still use salt as an insulator/leveler in some of those ovens for example, and they do not in general apply modern insulating concepts for an episodic use oven.

Assuming this is for your home, 8-1/2" of mass is a lot for the walls.  Consider sailoring the brick (2.5"), plus 2-3" of cladding instead.  If money is an object, ditch the blanket and do 3-4" of perlite or vermiculite concrete instead.

Offline jomo_eng

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2015, 08:00:57 AM »
I would be fine with 2.5" of sailor bricks. I had seen it done both ways. My understanding is that Craig's oven has his bricks faced in the thinner manner.   

I had to go look up cladding. In the roughly 100 threads I have looked at it was never mentioned. The idea of using cladding is interesting. My first thought is that we are getting the same thickness but lowering the mass. I wonder if using left over firebrick cut down to 1/4 or 1/2" and mortared in place would not give the same thermal mass in a smaller form.

I am planning to order the insulation today. I am torn between 2" and 4" of ceramic foam board for the floor. Would appreciate your thoughts there. Roughly cost me an extra $150 to go to 4" from 2".

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2015, 08:56:39 AM »
If you can get Foamglas, you could put 3-4" of it under your (2") ceramic board for the same money. It's got a better R-value, but it's pretty tender, and it tops out at 900F so you want something between it and the floor brick.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2015, 09:26:11 AM »
I would be fine with 2.5" of sailor bricks. I had seen it done both ways. My understanding is that Craig's oven has his bricks faced in the thinner manner.   

I had to go look up cladding. In the roughly 100 threads I have looked at it was never mentioned. The idea of using cladding is interesting. My first thought is that we are getting the same thickness but lowering the mass. I wonder if using left over firebrick cut down to 1/4 or 1/2" and mortared in place would not give the same thermal mass in a smaller form.

I am planning to order the insulation today. I am torn between 2" and 4" of ceramic foam board for the floor. Would appreciate your thoughts there. Roughly cost me an extra $150 to go to 4" from 2".

Cladding is mentioned plenty in the forum. Search Cladding> Entire Forum.

4"-6" of insulating concrete ( perlcrete/vermicrete) will cost you less than $50 and you will get excellent performance out of it.

If you're applying a cladding layer to the sailor course, make sure you add some reinforcing to it.....either welded mesh or something like stainless refractory needles to maintain its dual purpose as a structural/mass component.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2015, 09:28:35 AM by stonecutter »
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Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2015, 09:55:52 AM »
I do not like the cost of ceramic board, as noted, perlite or vermiculite concrete is much less expensive and works well.

Offline jomo_eng

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2015, 09:48:09 PM »
Thanks for the information. I was planning to use insulating concrete on top of the insulating blankets. I was thinking the board and blankets would cut weeks off my time by not having to mix up more insulating concrete. I guess I am overthinking the extra time involved to make insulating concrete.


Offline jomo_eng

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Re: Planning a pizza oven build in N. Louisiana
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2015, 03:09:46 PM »
Does anyone have recommendation on the steel thickness for the flat disc that will support the concrete and the round band that will hold the concrete on the stand?  I am planning to call some metal shops and ask someone to cut me a round disk of the right diameter but I wasn't sure on the recommended thickness.  The diameter looks like it will be approximately 64-68 inches.  This project gives me a good excuse to get a welder and start learning.  I do not have any prior experience with metal work as is apparent from this post.

Thanks,
Joe


 

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