Author Topic: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven  (Read 10503 times)

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Offline CaliforniaPizzaGuy

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2005, 12:20:39 PM »
Steve in my neighborhood we have 3 phase power running through to feed a school located in my subdivision. But calipizza guy refered to his oven as having 3 phases. I dont think he understands what 3 phase electical service is. Johnstone supply will be able to order any part thats needed to repair this oven.


Im a idiot after doing research i found out i do not have 3 phases i only have 1 phase, so i might as well try to convert the oven to single phase, this is a dumb question but what would be the difference ?


Offline dmun

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2005, 02:48:46 PM »

I do not have 3 phases i only have 1 phase, so i might as well try to convert the oven to single phase, this is a dumb question but what would be the difference ?

No dumb questions, just dumb mistakes.  You know that alternating current changes polarity 60 times per second.  It doesn't just jump from positive to negative, but is a wave form.  The standard 240 volt power in households consists of two of the three phases, or waves, of the current: To add the third phase, you either have to get (and get billed for) commercial three phase from the power company,  (They usually won't do this unless you use a LOT of electricity.  I run a little machine shop, and have three phase right across the street, but I can't get it at my usage levels),  or the alternative,  to make your own third phase with a rotary generator.  These make a lot of noise but they work fine.  The solid state three phase converters just fool motors into thinking they have the third phase, and you don't get the benefits like instant reversing, and they run on partial horsepower.  I assume on a heating appliance they would be worthless.

It might be cheaper to convert to single phase heating elements if they are available.

David

Offline CaliforniaPizzaGuy

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2005, 04:30:12 PM »
im going to be bumed out if i cant convert this oven, wish me luck my fellow pizzagoers !!!

Offline Steve

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2005, 08:27:01 PM »
No dumb questions, just dumb mistakes.  You know that alternating current changes polarity 60 times per second.  It doesn't just jump from positive to negative, but is a wave form.  The standard 240 volt power in households consists of two of the three phases, or waves, of the current: To add the third phase, you either have to get (and get billed for) commercial three phase from the power company,  (They usually won't do this unless you use a LOT of electricity. 

David, I believe that you are mistaken. Household current is single-phase (split-phase is a more accurate term). There is no such thing as "two phase" current. Power is dirtributed as either single (split) phase or three phase.

Steve
« Last Edit: November 03, 2005, 08:29:02 PM by Steve »
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Offline myxsix

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2006, 12:25:49 AM »
Ovens are all different but I've heard the hotter the better - any comments. How about an electric oven that maxes at about 750 degrees F?

Offline slam

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Re: Few Questions About A Pizza Oven
« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2012, 10:47:53 PM »
do you have any prints for your oven. I need to get some for an electrical problem.
Thanks


 

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