Author Topic: Traveling with dough  (Read 871 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sum1else

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 91
  • Location: NYC
Traveling with dough
« on: June 15, 2012, 02:32:23 PM »
I need to travel next weekend with some pizza dough, I'm looking for some tips. I am leaving on Friday, but won't need it until Saturday. A short rise is OK, the crowd will be impressed regardless.

I am contemplating pre-mixing the flour, water, oil at home on Friday, and then adding the yeast when I arrive. Figure the dough will sit for 5-8 hours before the yeast gets added. Will this hurt me? I've never done an autolyse this long.

I'm afraid of adding the yeast initially, because the trip will be totally unpredictable. There will probably be tons of traffic, and the car will be very hot for the yeast.


Offline pizzaneer

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1476
  • Location: Nirvana
  • Pizza and zen more pizza
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2012, 03:05:21 PM »
No cooler available?  Even without the yeast, you will probably see some activity you don't want if the car is very hot.  :(
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22453
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2012, 03:11:19 PM »
Tyler,

You aren't the first one to have that problem. See, for example, the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11463.msg104700.html#msg104700.

In your case, I think you can get away with the protocol you mentioned. Normally, an autolyse is fairly brief but there are instances where it can be fairly long. I don't know if you have been following the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19129.0.html, but there is something called a soaker that comprises just flour and water and can be held for long periods of time, typically in the refrigerator for many hours. The soaker is usually combined with some of the remaining formula flour and water (the part not used in the soaker) as part of the final mix, in addition to the yeast, salt and sugar, if used. In your case, adding the oil to the flour/water mix should not be a problem, and I think your dough should survive 5-8 hours of travel time. To be on the safe side, you might put the autolysed dough with the oil in it in a cooler for the duration of the trip, maybe with some ice. At your destination, you can transfer the autolysed dough to a refrigerator. You didn't say anything about salt, which I assume you would be using, but the salt can also be added at the time of the final mix. En route, without yeast in the dough, it will not ferment and it will not rise. The amylase and protease enzymes will still be at work but if you keep the dough cool, the enzymes will not work as fast as at ambient temperature.

Another alternative is to prepare the dough as you would normally and freeze it, letting it slowly defrost in the cooler en route to your destination. You might add a bit more yeast to the dough since freezing will kill some of it. I discussed this possibility in the abovereferenced thread at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11463.msg104732.html#msg104732. Both Norma and I have made several frozen doughs, as discussed most recently over at the Mellow Mushroom thread, and they work out really well for short term (one or two days) freezing regimens.

I might also add that in my travels I will often find a mozzarella cheese that I would like to try at home. I typically freeze the mozzarella and pack it in an insulated carrier that I put into my suitcase. I remove the mozzarella cheese from the freezer and put it in the insulated carrier just as I am heading to the airport for the trip home. The travel time from that point to home can be five or six hours. But, by the time I get back home, the mozzarella cheese is largely defrosted, but not completly. I then put it in the refrigerator or freezer until I am ready to use it. I would think that a frozen dough should behave similarly.

Good luck. Whatever you decide to do, let us know what you did and how things turned out.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 15, 2012, 03:20:38 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline weemis

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 589
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Columbus, OH
    • My Pizza Web Blog
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2012, 04:06:45 PM »
i second the frozen dough method. my practice is to make the dough, ball it, brush with oil and individually wrap in plastic wrap. then into the freezer. keep it out of the sun and direct heat and it'll stay mostly frozen for several hours.
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline sum1else

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 91
  • Location: NYC
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2012, 05:02:39 PM »
Thanks so much for the tips and the links. I will surely write back. Luckily the hosts are providing sauce and cheese. 

I won't have a cooler available, so I may try freezing it ahead of time. I assume I should ball the doughs then, instead of freezing a huge mass of it.

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22453
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2012, 05:05:00 PM »
I won't have a cooler available, so I may try freezing it ahead of time. I assume I should ball the doughs then, instead of freezing a huge mass of it.

Tyler,

Yes, that is correct.

Peter

Offline pizzaneer

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1476
  • Location: Nirvana
  • Pizza and zen more pizza
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2012, 05:31:25 PM »
Freeze the balls in individual bags, and wrap the mass of them in every blanket you have.  If you can get to a camping store, get the foil survival blanket.   Use that as the outside layer, and basically you made a cooler.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Online theppgcowboy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 172
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2012, 08:26:19 PM »
Make your dough as normal, ball, then freeze.  When you are on the road, you can pack them with some cool packs to help if a cooler is not available, then set em out to rise and impress the crowd.  Good luck

Offline sum1else

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 91
  • Location: NYC
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2012, 11:17:10 AM »
Unfortunately I won't be doing this on this weekend. Plans changed and the  timing just won't work out. Hopefully in the next week or two I'll get to try travelling with frozen dough, and will let you all know how it works.