Author Topic: Success  (Read 1778 times)

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Offline JF_Aidan_Pryde

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Success
« on: October 05, 2005, 01:23:02 PM »
Finally I've overcome the browning issues. Didn't add sugar or oil. I think this pizza complies to DOP!

Specification:
62.5% hydration
11.9% gluten bread flour
Hand mixed and kneaded using 'add flour gradually' method
Autolyse + overnight rise

230gram dough ball
12" pizza




Offline JF_Aidan_Pryde

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Re: Success
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2005, 01:24:49 PM »
Dual stone method still works wonders. This is a 4min pie: 2min on lower stone, 2 min on upper with broil.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Success
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2005, 01:48:26 PM »
James,

Congratulations. I'm glad to see that you stuck with it and didn't give up :).

From what you said in your posts, I calculate that your thickness factor was around 0.07 [(230/28.35)/(3.14 x 6 x 6) = 0.072]. From the standpoint of crust thickness, that would put your pizza in the same camp as pftaylor's Raquel or Sophia recipe or maybe one of Jeff's recipes. Were you using a particular dough recipe?

Peter

Offline rscox62

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Re: Success
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2005, 03:55:07 PM »
was this a overnight rise in the fridge or the counter. Did you fight with the dough

Offline JF_Aidan_Pryde

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Re: Success
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2005, 10:59:47 PM »
Hi Peter,

Thanks for the kind words. :)

I have made quite a few pies with both Jeff's and pftaylor's recipe. After a while I realised they weren't quite different. The theme of both recipes is the use of rest periods during the mixing stage; both call for a 20min autolyse at batter stage and another rest period further on. The recipe I used didn't follow either of them to the word but definitely followed both in spirit! I would say the above pie is reproducible using either recipe.

I was aiming for a 240g dough ball but ended up 10g less due to losing some dough on the mixing bowl. I also read that Marco uses 250g for a 12", which gave me doubts about whether I can stretch mine to 12". It came out okay, a little transparent at certain places. I think I'll up it to 250g next time.

rscox62,
I read your post about your troubles with refrigerated dough. The problem is that you re-kneaded the dough ball after it came out. For the longest time, this whole 'punch down / re-form dough ball' thing has given me trouble too. Here's how it works with respect to elasticity.

After a dough ball is just formed, it will behave as a super elastic mass. The second you try to stretch, it will shrink back; it has a huuuuge pullback force. If you leave this ball untouched and as time goes on, two factors will improve: extensibility and hydration. In other words, the dough gets much easier to spread, the fighting force subsides and the wetness of the dough becomes more uniform. After two hours of rest, the initial "impossible dough ball" would be somewhat possible, but still fairly difficult. But overnight refrigeration gives the dough a 10 hour+ rest and puts it into a super relaxed state. If you take it out of the fridge, bring it to room temperature and work it, the dough will be so relaxed it will drip. That's how the above pizza was made.

However, if you re-form the dough ball once it comes out of the fridge, you end up back in square one -- a super elastic dough ball. It doesn't matter where it's been before, in the fridge for 2 hours or 2 days, it will still be super elastic. It's still possible to make a pizza with it though, just wait for a few good hours. But of course it's easier to just not punch it down to begin with. :)

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Success
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2005, 08:19:07 AM »
JF_Aidan_Pryde,
I am truly happy for you. You have made significant progress and in a shorter period of time than most. In your case, the visual improvement is undeniable. You also had more constraints than most with the lack of quality ingredients issue you previously described. It doesn't seem to have hurt you now which is why we all know just how important the skills of a pizzaiolo really are. You have just proven that notion.

I just hope you enjoy the fruits of your labor for the rest of your life. For me, home pizza making is an analog for golf (my other passion and hobby), in that, it is a game for life. Funny how I'm attracted to hobbies where you never know what to expect on a daily basis, you can learn something new everytime you participate, practice really does improve your game, and you get to see the tangible results of your work immediately.

From here, you can still improve but the "mule" work is primarily done. Let us know how we can all help.
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Success
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2005, 08:41:41 AM »
James,

I echo pftaylor's sentiments, except for the golf part. Unlike pftaylor, I don't have the capacity to handle more than one passion at a time :).

Peter

Offline JF_Aidan_Pryde

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Re: Success
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2005, 11:09:19 AM »
Thanks guys, your help and encourangement is what made this possible. :)

With that said, I am not about to sit still.  I've already taken the next step and ordered the Italian starters along with "Classic Sourdoughs" from sourdo.com. I can't wait to taste crisceto leavened pizza! ;D