Author Topic: dough containers  (Read 3637 times)

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Offline art.vandelay

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dough containers
« on: June 24, 2012, 03:14:09 AM »
hello all,
what have you all found as the best container to use when doing a cold rise in the fridge?
currently, I am using a large zip lock bag but feel there are probably better options.
thanks for any help.
best-
Art


Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2012, 08:30:11 AM »
I like plastic bowls, Glad are popular but a lot of companies make suitable versions. I like the dough being in a round configuration while it proofs, it make it easier to make a nice round pie. Make sure that whatever you use is large enough to allow for the dough to rise once it warms out of the fridge.

Offline moose13

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2012, 10:35:25 AM »
I bought some of these stackable metal proofing containers. They do the job and take up less space. Cheap too.
I have 3 containers with one lid.
I agree with the round containers, i was having trouble getting a round pie. Proof your dough in a round shape, it will make it much easier to finish with a round product.
http://www.katom.com/166-DRPS5725.html

Offline bfguilford

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2012, 11:36:23 AM »
+1 on the round containers making it easier to create a round pie. I actually came to that conclusion a different way. Because of my rectangular 12x20 stone, I make oval pies (around 16x11). I had a heck of a time at first when proofing in a round container. When I switched to an oval container... easy as pie.  ;)

Barry
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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2012, 11:58:21 AM »
Barry

The same goes for doing square or rectangular pies. Whenever I'm doing Sicilian style I try to remember to proof the dough in a square or rectangular container. Believe it or not, it makes shaping a lot easier.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2012, 01:05:35 PM »
Art,

Over the years I think that I have tried just about all kinds of containers for storing dough, from glass, plastic and metal container (round are best for round pizzas as the others have noted), empty bread bags, plastic restaurant containers, and zip-type storage bags. I currently use mostly glass, like Pyrex glass containers (which member November suggested to me), or plastic containers. The best type of plastic container is one that you can see through, much like glass containers, to observe the performance of the dough, especially at the sides and at the bottom. For my glass and plastic containers, I drill a small hole in the middle of the lids. That allows the gases of fermentation to escape while retaining condensation in the containers. The holes in the lids are most beneficial if a fair amount of yeast is to be used. But if too much yeast is used, the forces of fermentation can be powerful enough to cause the lid to pop off. In cases like this, it might be preferable to cover the storage container with a hotel shower cap or a piece of plastic wrap.

For some other related tips that I have used over the years in relation to storage containers, see Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1508.msg13777.html#msg13777.

Peter

Offline scott123

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2012, 08:31:37 PM »
I use these:

http://www.bakedeco.com/detail.asp?id=12232&categoryid=149#.T-ewQmroozM

I am to a point where I don't need to see the bottom of my dough.

I'm just about ready to graduate up to trays.  A tray minimizes the amount of dough contacting plastic, which makes for easier removal and less oiling. It also, imo, makes for a prettier rim, because the non contacting part of the dough is smooth, while the contacting area has pits and craters. In tupperware, where the dough goes up the side, you have a lot of pitted area.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2012, 08:51:29 PM by scott123 »

Offline anton-luigi

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2012, 01:40:43 PM »
I use these:

http://www.bakedeco.com/detail.asp?id=12232&categoryid=149#.T-ewQmroozM

I am to a point where I don't need to see the bottom of my dough.

I'm just about ready to graduate up to trays.  A tray minimizes the amount of dough contacting plastic, which makes for easier removal and less oiling. It also, imo, makes for a prettier rim, because the non contacting part of the dough is smooth, while the contacting area has pits and craters. In tupperware, where the dough goes up the side, you have a lot of pitted area.
  this is good info,  makes perfect sense,  I seem to have a lot of issues with the fermented ball sticking to the rubbermaid bowl,  and I fight the urge to oil the bowl more.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #8 on: June 25, 2012, 02:14:53 PM »
Those look like nice containers, may have to look into purchasing a few of those.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2012, 02:21:45 PM »
Damn, 2 plastic bowls with 1 lid = $30.54 including shipping. I'll stick with the cheapo Glads for next to nothing from a store near you with no shipping charge. :o


Offline anton-luigi

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2012, 02:30:12 PM »
they're 6.95 a piece    ???

Offline scott123

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2012, 03:20:00 PM »
Dave, the shipping really drives up the price. If you ever make it down to NJ, they have these plastic proofing pans at Corrado's in Clifton. That's where I got mine.  I think I paid $5 each.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2012, 03:27:28 PM »
Thanks for that heads up Scott. My son lived in Jersey City for a while as a student at NYU, and I used to drive by Clifton on my way to visit my daughter at U Delaware. Both are now done in those locations so my trips down that way will be limited. Someday though, I will be in the area and get my hands on a couple.

Offline bfguilford

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2012, 03:32:31 PM »
I currently use mostly glass, like Pyrex glass containers (which member November suggested to me), or plastic containers.

Peter: I bought some 4.5 cup pyrex containers, because I liked the way the flatter shape fits into my fridge space. I've used them twice, and both times, even though I oiled them, I found the dough stuck quite a bit more than when I used Glad containers. I would prefer to use the pyrex, and am wondering what your experience has been?

Barry
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2012, 04:16:11 PM »
Peter: I bought some 4.5 cup pyrex containers, because I liked the way the flatter shape fits into my fridge space. I've used them twice, and both times, even though I oiled them, I found the dough stuck quite a bit more than when I used Glad containers. I would prefer to use the pyrex, and am wondering what your experience has been.

Barry,

I oil my dough balls pretty well before putting them into my Pyrex glass containers and have had no real sticking problems. When ready to use the dough balls, I just turn the containers upside down and let gravity help release the dough balls while, at the same time, I ease the dough balls out of the containers using my hand.

Peter

Offline patnugent

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2012, 03:53:32 PM »
I do our initial bulk rise in a metal mixing bowl covered with plastic wrap.  After balling the dough I put it into glad tupperware with a little oil and plastic wrap over the top again(the gas from the dough expanding pops the fitted lids off.)

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #16 on: August 27, 2012, 11:47:24 PM »
I use the cheapo plastics when I make more than four doughs, but I always use these metal proofing pans first (I only have 5).  They are bigger which allows the balls to grow without contacting the side, stack which takes less room, and need only one lid per stack which makes cleanup easier.

http://www.acitydiscount.com/Adcraft-1-Dozen-48oz-Dough-Retarding-Proofing-Pan-Aluminum-PZ-DRPE800.0.74502.1.1.htm

Offline JConk007

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2012, 01:08:00 AM »
 for balled fridgerise www.doughmate.com they fit in standard fridge I can get em or call madan plastics
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2012, 01:32:27 AM »
If I were to go pro, I'd use the trays for sure. At home, with 8-20 balls. The individual gladware-type containers can't be beat.
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Offline JConk007

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Re: dough containers
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2012, 01:38:56 AM »
No not more tupperware everytime I open the cabinet those plastic storage containers  seem to have doubled in volume again!!! Like rabbits! and I just dont like cleaning all those little devils but yes for 5-10 they work great!
John
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