Author Topic: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.  (Read 295 times)

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Offline Ogwoodfire

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To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« on: May 19, 2015, 08:09:56 PM »
I know there has been quite a bit of talk on this forum about the autolyse method and I'm not sure if someone has done it but u would like to conduct a trial and was hoping to set the parameters of the expirament. I was thinking something to the tune of 30 minute autolyse vs standard incorporation with 63% hydration 2% starter 3% salt with 24 hour bulk ferment than 24 hour balled. I will take feedback and conduct the expirament within the next 2 weeks (would do sooner but Iam in the process of moving). I think it will be interesting to see if this method has any effect if any on the final product. I have been using this process for years but have had good results with and without, but have never conducted a side by side comparison. Thoughts?


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2015, 08:20:54 PM »
Rather than to simply test a hypothesis that there is a difference between a dough that incorporates autolyse and an otherwise similar dough that does not, I think it would be much more interesting if you would define exactly what you think will be the differences and test that more detailed hypothesis.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2015, 12:42:08 AM »
Sure why not. I would suspect (if any) the differences will be in gluten development (supposedly autolyse produces more orderly gluten development) texture, and possibly color and crumb due to different levels of oxidation from kneeling.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2015, 08:50:54 AM »
I was thinking you should be even more specific than that and describe what you expect to experience in both pizzas - basically describe what you think it is doing for your pizza - describe the specific differences you expect in taste, texture, tenderness, oven spring, color, browning, leoparding, etc.
Pizza is not bread. Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline David Esq.

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2015, 10:59:58 AM »
Also, include a double blind taste test with a statistically significant pool of subjects who will respond to questions regarding digestibility of the final product. It would be great to have a large enough pool of subjects to include those with and without known difficulties digesting wheat while being cognizant of the fact that those who suffer greatly from gluten intolerance ought to be compensated for their participation in the study.

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2015, 07:23:54 PM »
I have an event in July I can possibly test this with. I'm moving this week and have no access to my oven so it may have to wait a few weeks.

Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: To autolyse or not to autolyse, that is the question.
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2015, 07:25:20 PM »
I could create a scorecard where guest rated each of the mentioned categories by Craig.


 

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