Author Topic: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum  (Read 430 times)

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Offline Morudy

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Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« on: August 03, 2016, 04:01:33 AM »
Not posted pics for ages so thought I'd share my latest creations as I'm quite pleased with them. 20 RT, somewhere between 63-65% hydro

Chewing gum! (Gummy pizza) It's been discussed here numourous times but I want to bring it up again. On another thread there were pics of Ciro salvos pizza and the thought that they were gummy that day. So it happens to everyone. What the hell is it? When it happens it's so unpleasant to eat. Surely there is a technical reason for it. I've been feeling like it may be due to over fermentation in the first rise... Or possibly just not getting everything aligned properly in the mix?

Thoughts?

Offline italdream

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Re: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2016, 09:49:17 AM »
Chewing gum! (Gummy pizza)
Thoughts?

Beautiful Pizzas!!!

I probably wrote the comment about 50 Kalo that you were referring to. I am not even sure that "gummy" was the best way to describe it since I have seen the term often used by detractors of the Neapolitan style criticizing the characteristic tenderness that we all love.

In the case of Salvo'S pizzas, it was especially odd. The baking was fine, they showed decent leoparding, an even underskirt and other features (suggesting proper rise and baking) but then when you cut the pies, and eat them, they seemed undercooked inside, sort of doughy.

I could not point the finger to what caused it (perhaps it is more common with excessive oven temperature to accommodate heavy demand) but it was definitely a defect. Too put it mildly, my sister who still leaves in Naples and eats pizza from lots of different places, thought that it was inedible. That is an exaggeration but I could not hide some disappointment.

Looking forward for others to chime in on what may cause the issue.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2016, 09:53:25 AM by italdream »

Offline Morudy

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Re: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2016, 12:43:31 PM »
Yes... Sorry italdreams. It was your comment. Certainly got me thinking. If the pizza is cooked too fast in a hot oven then it's sure to have that stodgy (and kind of gummy) texture no doubt. Not pleasant to eat at all. There is also another texture I'm referring to (which may have been it at 50 Kalo also) where the pizza appears cooked (even once cut inside to check crumb), but holds a chewy, gummy quality. The reason I re-brought it up is that I've had it in my dough a couple of times recently, and this corresponded to some unusally hot weather here so thought it could be linked more with fermentation process than the cooking. Possibly flour was too hot pre mixing? Bad batch of flour? Too much strength or elastic after mixing? Very hard to experiment with it... As it only appears once in a blue moon.

Online The Dough Doctor

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Re: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2016, 03:33:35 PM »
There can be a major issue with what is referred to as the "dreaded gum line". This is easily identified if you turn a slice over (top down) and use a razor blade or very sharp serrated knife t cut through the crust, then separate the cut slice and look at the cut side, if you see a well defined gray area immediately under the sauce, congratulations, you have a gum line. To further confirm the gum line take another slice, turn it upside down and beginning at the edge tear the slice apart in the middle as best you can, watch as the crust cleaves apart, if you see a web of dough being stretched (called feathering) between the two pieces as they are pulled apart this is confirmation of a gum line. There are about seven different issues that can cause the gum line (thoroughly discussed in one of my articles in PMQ Magazine) and until you identify the correct cause the gum line just won't go away, this is why it is called the dreaded gum line. Some causes: Dough stretched too thin; too much sauce; pre-saucing; baking at excessively high temperature; poor or incorrect dough management procedure or parameters; insufficient yeast level (generally correlates to poor dough management).
In any case the presence of a gum line results in a tough, very chewy eating characteristic.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


Offline Morudy

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Re: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2016, 06:36:58 PM »
I thank you greatly for your input and feel a little stupid that I had not seen all this before. Absolutely intriguing. Thank you...

I feel the phrase "dreaded gum line" is going to start becoming a hot topic where we are. Let the dissecting begin  :-D

Offline schold

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Re: Latest pizzas and... Chewing gum
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2016, 04:58:57 AM »
I thought that I had experienced gummy pizza because the the last pieces of cornicione on some of my pies become somewhat chewy near the end of eating. It was much more of a problem before than now. Anyway, in Italy this summer, I had a pizza which literally felt like chewing gum in consistency. It was terrible and I didn't even know it could get that bad.
Cooking is not a recipe, it's a philosophy - unless it's pastry, then it's chemistry.

- Marco Pierre White