Author Topic: Help! My dough keeps tearing.  (Read 501 times)

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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2014, 01:38:27 PM »
Craig (and anyone else who always leaves their starter out at room temp), do you find that leaving the starter out produces a less acidic starter? Approximately what ratio of starter to flour and water do you use? I'm assuming it's not 1:1:1, or the starter would become very acidic very quickly, right?

Probably - but because you feed (and dilute the acidity) more often when it's at room temp. I do the feeding by sight. I don't measure anything My normal feeding routine is to add some water - maybe 50% of the starter volume, mix it up, dump half out, and add enough flour to reach a thick batter-like consistency. That's it.

Your problem really surprises me. I've never had anything like it when using such small quantities of starter.

If I had to guess, I'd say it enzyme related more so than acid. If it was acid breakdown, surely you would have a strongly detectable acid bite in the dough.
Pizza is not bread.


Online TXCraig1

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2014, 01:39:33 PM »
How much salt (%) are you using?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2014, 04:11:16 PM »
How much salt (%) are you using?
A 250g dough ball is comprised of the following:

150g 00 flour (100%)
93.5g water (62.5%)
4.5g salt (3%)
2g Ischia starter (1.3%)


Online TXCraig1

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #23 on: September 16, 2014, 04:32:42 PM »
I don't know what to tell you. I'm surprised you are having this problem. It will be interesting to see what happens with IDY.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2014, 04:45:30 PM »
I don't know what to tell you. I'm surprised you are having this problem. It will be interesting to see what happens with IDY.
Thanks for the tips. I'll keep you updated.

Perhaps one other thing to note is that I'm not very consistent with my starter feeding regimen prior to "activating" the dough. Sometime it's at it's peak, sometime it's a number of hours after it peaks, sometime I'll pull it straight from the fridge and let it warm to room temp. I've been more consistent lately, but this last time the starter had deflated for a number of hours (probably between 4-6) before using.

Offline dineomite

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #25 on: September 16, 2014, 07:20:02 PM »
If they collapse that soon after you're done cooking I'd try reducing the percentage of Ischia.

I think the bigger issue is the feeding schedule. I find it very difficult to anticipate what my fermentation is going to be like if the starter is jumping all over the place due to sporadic feeding. My biggest successes seem to come when the starter is rising and falling predictably and I begin mixing the dough just as it's starting to recede. A regular feeding regimen certainly informs you on how active [or inactive] your yeast is behaving.

Try lowering the yeast percentage and see what happens.

Offline dbarneschi

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Re: Help! My dough keeps tearing.
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2014, 11:42:30 PM »
If they collapse that soon after you're done cooking I'd try reducing the percentage of Ischia.

I think the bigger issue is the feeding schedule. I find it very difficult to anticipate what my fermentation is going to be like if the starter is jumping all over the place due to sporadic feeding. My biggest successes seem to come when the starter is rising and falling predictably and I begin mixing the dough just as it's starting to recede. A regular feeding regimen certainly informs you on how active [or inactive] your yeast is behaving.

Try lowering the yeast percentage and see what happens.
Good advice. I'll experiment with this.