Author Topic: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar  (Read 1944 times)

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Online jsaras

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I really wish that I had read this recipe when I got started on this journey.  Everything that a person needs to know about making pizza well right out of the gate is here; ingredients by weight, cold water, high hydration, stretch & fold, steel plate, etc., and you don't have to scan through 90 posts in a single thread that has 12 variations of a single recipe!

The recipe comes from Jeff Mahin, the chef at Stella Rossa Pizza Bar in Santa Monica, CA ("yuppie" neo-Neapolitan pizzas).

Here's the background info:
http://www.thedailymeal.com/tips-making-perfect-pizza-dough

Here's the recipe:
http://www.thedailymeal.com/pizza-dough-recipe
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Online jsaras

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2012, 05:30:15 PM »
I've converted the recipe to baker's percentages:

(100%) preferably King Arthur organic all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting.
(2.6%) 1.1 ounces sea salt
(1.375%) instant dry yeast, preferably SAF instant yeast
(75%) filtered water, chilled below 65 degrees

The yeast seems unusually high to me. My calculations assume that a teaspoon of yeast weighs 0.0966 oz.

Thoughts?

 
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2012, 07:23:23 PM »
Jonas,

A lot of people mistakingly think that this forum is a recipe forum, or should be--with recipes that are standalone, completely self contained and complete in every detail as one might find in a cookbook. That perception is fully understandable since there are literally hundreds of dough recipes and formulations on this forum. That said, it would be nice and convenient to have recipes and formulations that are like those that might be found in cookbooks but that is not the mission of this forum. A lot of the work and the recipes and formulations on this forum represents original work and has an evolutionary aspect. That is one of the reasons you will find many versions and forms of many of the recipes. 

Now, turning to the recipe you cited, I have taken the liberty of using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html to come up with a baker's percent version of the recipe. It is as follows:

King Arthur Organic All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (75%):
IDY (1.5061%):
Sea Salt (2.5%):
Total (179.0061%):
1200 g  |  42.33 oz | 2.65 lbs
900 g  |  31.75 oz | 1.98 lbs
18.07 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 6 tsp | 2 tbsp
30 g | 1.06 oz | 0.07 lbs | 5.37 tsp | 1.79 tbsp
2148.07 g | 75.77 oz | 4.74 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Dough is for seven dough balls, each weighing 300 grams (10.58 ounces); no bowl residue compensation

One of the pieces of information that would have been useful but that I could not find in the two articles referenced is the size of pizzas that are to be made from the 300-gram dough balls. Maybe I missed it, but to me that is an important piece of information to be included in the instructions for making the pizzas. If I knew the pizza size, I would have been able to calculate the thickness factor for the pizzas.

I also note that the recipe is intended to use IDY in lieu of a starter. In the background article you referenced, it says that Jeff Mahin uses a natural starter in his restaurant, maybe in the form of a natural poolish, biga, or some other form of natural preferment. You are correct that the amount of IDY is high. In fact, I estimate that if one were to convert the roughly 1.5% IDY to a natural preferment, it would take roughly 2.56 cups of natural preferment. Whether that is the amount of preferment that Jeff uses in his restaurant is hard to say since the articles do not say. But, by my estimation, 2.56 cups of a typical poolish or sponge preferment would be equal to over 54% of the formula flour or around 73% of the formula water. Both of those values are high values. That makes it difficult to say whether an IDY version is equivalent to what Jeff produces in his restaurant. In my experience, professionals are reluctant to disclose what they do in their own establishments. As a result, they suggest something different for home pizza makers. Invariably, the recipes for the home pizza makers come up short and might even be seriously flawed.

In situations like this, the best thing to do is to try out the recipe and see how it works out for you. If you do decide to try it out, please come back and tell us how things worked out.

Peter


Online jsaras

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2012, 08:15:57 PM »
Thanks Peter,

The pizzas at his restaurant are 12-13 inches in size.  Assuming it's a 13-inch pizza(because I like it thin), the thickness factor is .07971   
« Last Edit: July 11, 2012, 08:34:07 PM by jsaras »
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Offline scott123

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2012, 08:17:38 PM »
1/2" steel being recommended for home bakers by a professional pizzeria owner?!?! :o

That's a first.

While I'm happy that there's someone out there recommending steel (and in the right thickness), I think it's essential to remember that steel is not a one size fits all solution, and, that, for quite a few ovens, it works beautifully, but, for ovens without a broiler in the main compartment, it's an especially poor choice.

buceriasdon

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2012, 05:23:21 PM »
Jonas, Please do try this 75% hydration dough and post your findings. I have seen so many postings concerning problems with handling 65% doughs I question whether 75% is a good recipe for beginners.
Don

Online jsaras

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Re: Terrific info for beginners by Jeff Mahin - Stella Rosa Pizza Bar
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2012, 08:18:01 PM »
I won't be able to play with this until I get back from vacation next week. That said, high hydration doughs haven't been that troublesome. I just use an oiled baking sheet and wet hands. Several stretch and folds with 5 minute rests in-between and you're ready for the fridge. There's a YouTube video of Peter Reinhart demonstrating the stretch and fold technique that was very helpful to me.
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