Author Topic: Ischia starter?  (Read 9234 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tory

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 85
Ischia starter?
« on: June 28, 2012, 11:21:09 AM »
Can someone here please explain to me what an Ischia culture/starter is, and maybe how to make one?

I've seen info about it, but never heard of it before that. I've tried googling it, but searching just bring me back to this forum.

I did find a video on youtube, but it seems like they're starting in the middle of the process and adding to it without explaining what they've done or what they're doing.
Kind of annoying. :(

Thanks in advance for any help.

Tory


Offline anton-luigi

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 159
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2012, 11:33:23 AM »
the "Ischia" starter is a dry packet sourdough starter that is purchased from Sourdo.com as a part of their Italian starters along with the Camaldoli starter( a natural yeast that was wild-caught on Camaldoli hill),  it is a specific starter that comes from the Ischia Islands off the coast of Italy.  You cannot make or create one of these.  This particular yeast(Ischia) is a culture that has been in use there for 250 years as I understand it,  so you are buying a piece of history as well.  :)
« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 11:35:26 AM by anton-luigi »

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 26118
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2012, 11:50:11 AM »
Tory,

I tried to detail as much as I could of the process when I was learning how to activate the Ischia starter.  This is the thread where I activated the Ischia starter if you are interested.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11578.0.html

Other members helped me in the process of understanding.

Norma

Offline dwighttsharpe

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 97
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2012, 07:27:49 PM »
With a short search, this is the only source I could find:

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/ischia-sourdough-starter.html
Dwight

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19014
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2012, 08:17:05 PM »
I think most folks get it here: www.sourdo.com.

It's one of the two you get when you buy the Italian cultures.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Tory

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 85
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2012, 09:23:03 AM »
Thank you, everyone who answered my question. I've gone ahead and ordered some of that Ischia culture.

Does anyone know about that "Revised Classic Sourdough" book that is advertised on that same sourdo site?  Is it a good book?

-Tory

Offline akuban

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 172
  • Location: Astoria, Queens, NYC
  • Crusty, saucy, cheesy
    • Margot's Pizza
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2013, 09:51:30 PM »
I'm in the same boat OP was. I have always just cultured my own starter. But now I am curious about the sourdo.com Italian pack. For those of you who have done both, what advantages, if any, do you feel you've gotten from Ischia and/or Camaldoli?
¡Hasta la pizza!

Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 4736
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2013, 10:32:20 PM »
I'm in the same boat OP was. I have always just cultured my own starter. But now I am curious about the sourdo.com Italian pack. For those of you who have done both, what advantages, if any, do you feel you've gotten from Ischia and/or Camaldoli?


Adam,


Are you asking about advantages of sourdo.com vs. captured cultures or are you asking about Ischia vs. Camaldoli?

Offline carl333

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 465
  • Location: Montreal
  • Quest for a great dough! I found it, I found it!!
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2014, 12:57:53 PM »
Bill, looks like Adam disapeared. I'd like to hear from you egarding the difference in the 2 if you habe an opinion. I am looking to use a starter but don't know what direction to take

tks
Carl

Offline David Esq.

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1243
  • Location: New York
  • Making pizza since 2013
    • Eating With David
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2014, 09:56:24 PM »
It is all fine and dandy to buy a starter from someone who wants to make a buck selling it to you, but your Ischia starter will not perform any differently than a starter made at home or given to you by another baker who made it at home. Your starter's characteristics are determined by what you feed it, when you feed it, the temperature it is kept at, its hydration and other factors having nothing to do with where the original yeast and bacteria came from.


Offline szmulik

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2016, 04:48:07 PM »
What is the difference in the taste,  between Ischia starter and classic Sourdough which can be easy made from flour and water?
Does Ischia has sour taste?


Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 19014
  • Location: Houston, TX
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2016, 05:02:33 PM »
What is the difference in the taste,  between Ischia starter and classic Sourdough which can be easy made from flour and water?
Does Ischia has sour taste?

A sourdough made from flour and water may be very sour, or it may have no sourness at all. It depends on what strains of yeast and LAB happen to be there and take hold.

Ischia can have a sour taste, but you would have to work for it. I use 2% culture and ferment 48 hours at 64F, and the pizza will have virtually no sourness.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage


Offline szmulik

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2016, 05:40:29 PM »
Thanks TXCraig1

Offline paulraphael

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13
  • Location: Brooklyn
    • underbelly
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2016, 12:07:48 AM »
A sourdough made from flour and water may be very sour, or it may have no sourness at all. It depends on what strains of yeast and LAB happen to be there and take hold.

Ischia can have a sour taste, but you would have to work for it. I use 2% culture and ferment 48 hours at 64F, and the pizza will have virtually no sourness.

How would you work this culture for deliberate sourness?

Offline chrisf

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 37
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2016, 11:05:20 AM »
It is all fine and dandy to buy a starter from someone who wants to make a buck selling it to you, but your Ischia starter will not perform any differently than a starter made at home or given to you by another baker who made it at home. Your starter's characteristics are determined by what you feed it, when you feed it, the temperature it is kept at, its hydration and other factors having nothing to do with where the original yeast and bacteria came from.
I would disagree that different starters will not perform any differently. I've never used an Ischia but I've seen the photos of "lift" people get in canning jars. Whatever strain I bought from Monica Spillar back in the early '90's doesn't perform like the Iscia. It works quite well for my whole grain breads and even pizza but when I tried refreshments in a canning jar to see if it triples in 4 hours, I couldn't get there. At 82 degrees the most I got was a double.

I would like to try my hand at a Panettone but the directions say it's important to have the starter triple in 4 hours at 82 F. If someone here wants to trade some starter, mine for Ischia/Camaldoli let me know.

Online tinroofrusted

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1601
  • Location: OC, CA
  • Experimenting....
Re: Ischia starter?
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2016, 12:41:56 AM »
Thank you, everyone who answered my question. I've gone ahead and ordered some of that Ischia culture.

Does anyone know about that "Revised Classic Sourdough" book that is advertised on that same sourdo site?  Is it a good book?

-Tory
I don't know about that book.  I recommend "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast" by Ken Forkish. Very clear instructions and good photos. Good for both bread and pizza.