Author Topic: Ascorbic acid  (Read 4367 times)

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Offline Randy

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Ascorbic acid
« on: January 11, 2004, 07:41:02 AM »
Ascorbic acid, a dough conditioner, is added to help dough stretch easily.  I noticed Papa John uses Ascorbic acid in their pizza dough.  Bread machine yeast in the jars contain Ascorbic acid.  I tried them and it does seem to help.  The Baker's and Chefs Bread flour has it also I think.

Randy


Offline Steve

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2004, 08:16:31 AM »
My latest issue of Pizza Today magazine says to add L-cysteine to create a more relaxed dough (L-cysteine is sold to the pizza industry as PZ-44 or glutathione, which is basically dead yeast).

Anyone know where to buy this stuff?  ???
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Offline Steve

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2004, 08:21:49 AM »
Here's an excerpt from Tom Lehman (the "Dough Doctor"):
http://www.pmq.com/lehmann_winter-97-98.shtml

There are a number of different types of "conditioners" which can be used in making pizza dough, but for this article we will limit our discussion to reducing agents, the most commonly encountered type of conditioner used in pizza dough production at the pizzeria.  These are products, which by nature of their effect upon the flour proteins result in a softer, more extensible dough.  The active ingredient of these products will usually be one of the following: L-cysteine, sulfate, or glutathione (dead yeast).

As I've mentioned previously, these products can be used in making short time doughs, but where they really shine is in helping to achieve a slightly modified dough, or finished crust characteristic.  As an example, if your doughs are exhibiting a little too much shrinkage after forming, the addition of a small amount of one of these products to your formula can correct the problem without having to make any other changes to the formula or procedure.  Will the use of these products be perceived in any way by my customers?  No, not if they're used correctly.  Again, using L-cysteine as an example, when products containing this material are used within the manufacturer's recommendations, the effects are very predictable upon the dough handling properties, and there is no flavor or mouth-feel issue in the finished crust.  However, at higher levels, beyond the manufacture's recommendations, this material can impart a slight burning sensation to the lips and leave the customer with a sensation of being thirsty.
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Offline Steve

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2004, 08:35:35 AM »
Ascorbic acid, a dough conditioner, is added to help dough stretch easily.  I noticed Papa John uses Ascorbic acid in their pizza dough.  Bread machine yeast in the jars contain Ascorbic acid.  I tried them and it does seem to help.  The Baker's and Chefs Bread flour has it also I think.

According to Tom Lehmann, ascorbic acid (AA) is an "oxidizer" which is a dough strengthener, not a relaxer. Other oxidizers generally include products such as potassium bromate, azodicarbonamide (ADA). These products are all very functional at very low use levels, measured in parts per million (PPM), based on the flour weight.

I also found an article that states: "The addition of a small amount of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) eliminates the need for the first rising of the dough. Ascorbic acid / vitamin C (make sure they are not flavored) tablets are obtainable from the [drug store] in 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg sizes. The ascorbic acid is dissolved in the warm yeast liquid."

« Last Edit: January 11, 2004, 08:37:40 AM by Steve »
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Offline Randy

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2004, 09:27:59 AM »
First yes I have used "Dead Yeast"  It is available from King Arthur from time to time.  I have tried it and found no noticeable difference beyond a small change in crumb structure.  Papa Johns uses dead yeast also.
The term ď.. stretch easier.Ē comes from the improved gluten development therefore making it easier to stretch without tearing not that it made it relax.
A poor choice of words on my part.
 8)
Randy

Offline Steve

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2004, 10:26:41 AM »
A poor choice of words on my part.

Whoops... sorry!   ;D

I thought by "stretch easier" you meant a relaxed dough.

But you meant "stretch easier" as in holding together and not tearing (or "stronger").

My bad!
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Offline Randy

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2004, 10:56:33 AM »
No problem, my explanation of ascorbic acidís(vitamin C) function was a poor one and very misleading.

The usefulness of ascorbic acid might be better interrupted by its use in both SAF and Flesichmannís breadmachine yeast in the jar.

I looked on King Arthurís site and I did not find the dead yeast.  I bought some over a year ago.  It might be in the home catalog.  I will check.


Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Ascorbic acid
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2004, 03:07:09 PM »
I have used bread machine yeast with asorbic acid before, and while I have noticed a difference it wasn't a big one.

DKM
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