Author Topic: Solid Fat  (Read 4439 times)

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Offline charbo

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2012, 05:34:01 PM »
I mix by hand, and I was thinking that I might not be getting a good mix of the lard into the dough.  Then I ran across an article called “Cereal Lipids” by W. R. Morrison, found in Advances in Cereal Science and Technology Vol II, ed. Pomeranz 1978. 

Morrison states “Loaf volume, texture, and crumb are improved if high-melting-point fat is included in mechanically developed doughs; but the effect is not observed in doughs mixed at lower work levels.”  “Improvement occurs only if there is enough free lipid and if the high-melting-point fat is adequately dispersed.”

So there is a dilemma.  Mixing solid fat into the dough by hand is likely to be inadequate for the best rise.  On the other hand, significant oil should be added only after most or all the flour is wet, which is a hassle.

Experiments continue.


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2012, 06:39:19 PM »
WE always whisked the lard into the flour FIRST thing and then changed to the hook for rest of mix. That takes care of your disbursement issue.
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Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2012, 09:57:18 PM »
Since you are hand mixing, here is a pointer for lard whisking by hand.

"The best alternative to a weak mixer is not a spoon, but your bare hand. Whip and beat the lard with a rapid folding motion until you feel the lard is fluffy and full of air. It should be as light as butter creamed for the lightest butter cake."




I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2012, 10:05:23 PM »
Since you are hand mixing, here is a pointer for lard whisking by hand.

"The best alternative to a weak mixer is not a spoon, but your bare hand. Whip and beat the lard with a rapid folding motion until you feel the lard is fluffy and full of air. It should be as light as butter creamed for the lightest butter cake."





We are talking about a very small amount here...certainly not enough to slap around in a bowl with your hand/fingers...jus get in there with one of those small/baby whisks and git er done man!  ;) ;D  It won't take long and you will see nice little pelletized flour granuals...
« Last Edit: October 13, 2012, 10:07:28 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2012, 09:24:26 AM »
Please not that all of that work was done on bread doughs, using pan bread, not pizza dough using pizzas as the end product. There is a huge difference in how a dough responds when being pushed to a height of 4 to 5-inches as opposed to a maximum height of maybe 1.5 or 2-inches as is the case with a pizza crust. When making pan pizzas we have seen a slight improvement in proofing time when a solid fat is used over oil, but I sure wouldn't think that in a home setting 5-minutes in proof time would make a big difference, especially when we typically see greater differences than that due to differences in finished dough temperature, gluten development, and scaling accuracy of the ingredients. What I'm saying is I wouldn't sweat it. If you want to add a solid fat/plastic fat, just heat it slightly to soften it, then work it in right behind the water. I make dough by hand all the time at home and I find it pretty easy to work it in as I stir and knead the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline charbo

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Re: Solid Fat
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2012, 06:01:46 PM »
I devised a way to get a pretty good distribution of 3% lard into the dough, but the process, from set-up to clean-up, adds 10 minutes.   On the other hand, I seem to get just as good a rise with 3% oil, incorporated as follows:  Wait until 85% of the flour is wet, and then add the oil 1% at a time.  The oil process takes less time, gives a little more open crumb, is cheaper, and is healthier.   


 

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