Author Topic: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe  (Read 4208 times)

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Offline cchalmers

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Hello All,

I wanted to give this recipe I saw for New York Style Pizza on America's Test Kitchen a try.  You can watch the vid here if you'd like:

http://www.americastestkitchen.com/episodes/detail.php?docid=35172

And the recipe is at the bottom of this post.

My concern is this-  I have made pizza before, with not so consistent results.  I wanted to give this ATK recipe a try, but they use a food processor to make the dough, which I don't have.  I myself have a Kitchenaid 5.5qt stand mixer with a spiral dough hook.  I had planned on making one recipe's worth of dough (Two 13-inch pies, as detailed below).  The point of ATK, to me, is to follow the recipe, at least the first time if you want to get their "tested results".  So my question is, how can I make this recipe work using my stand mixer?  I am not sure how long I would have to knead it.  Also, is this too small an amount of dough for my stand mixer?  Sometimes when I make dough in my stand mixer I feel like I have a pool of dough sitting at the bottom of the bowl, and and "arm" of the dough grabbing the hook, just twisting in circles.  I really appreciate any help you guys can provide. Thanks!




Makes two 13-inch pizzas

Our preferred brand of whole-milk mozzarella is Dragone. You can shape the second dough ball while the first pizza bakes, but don't top the pizza until right before you bake it. If you don't have a baking stone, bake the pizzas on an overturned and preheated rimmed baking sheet. It is important to use ice water in the dough to prevent overheating the dough while in the food processor. Semolina flour is ideal for dusting the peel; use it in place of bread flour if you have it. The sauce will yield more than needed in the recipe; extra sauce can be refrigerated for up to a week or frozen for up to a month.

Ingredients
Dough
3 cups (16 1/2 ounces) bread flour , plus more for work surface (see note)
2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon instant or rapid-rise yeast 1 1/3 cups ice water (about 10 1/2 ounces) (see note)
1 tablespoon vegetable oil , plus more for work surface
1 1/2 teaspoons table salt Sauce
1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, drained and liquid discarded
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil1 teaspoon red wine vinegar2 medium garlic cloves, minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon table salt1 teaspoon dried oregano1/4 teaspoon ground black pepperCheese
1 ounce finely grated Parmesan cheese(about 1/2 cup)
8 ounces whole milk mozzarella, shredded (about 2 cups) (see note)
Instructions
1. FOR THE DOUGH: In food processor fitted with metal blade, process flour, sugar, and yeast until combined, about 2 seconds. With machine running, slowly add water through feed tube; process until dough is just combined and no dry flour remains, about 10 seconds. Let dough stand 10 minutes.

2. Add oil and salt to dough and process until dough forms satiny, sticky ball that clears sides of workbowl, 30 to 60 seconds. Remove dough from bowl and knead briefly on lightly oiled countertop until smooth, about 1 minute. Shape dough into tight ball and place in large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 24 hours and up to 3 days.

3. FOR THE SAUCE: Process all ingredients in food processor until smooth, about 30 seconds. Transfer to medium bowl or container and refrigerate until ready to use.

4. TO BAKE THE PIZZA: One hour before baking pizza, adjust oven rack to second highest position (rack should be about 4 to 5 inches below broiler), set pizza stone on rack, and heat oven to 500 degrees. Remove dough from refrigerator and divide in half. Shape each half into smooth, tight ball. Place on lightly oiled baking sheet, spacing them at least 3 inches apart; cover loosely with plastic wrap coated with nonstick cooking spray; let stand for 1 hour.

5. Coat 1 ball of dough generously with flour and place on well-floured countertop. Using fingertips, gently flatten into 8-inch disk, leaving 1 inch of outer edge slightly thicker than center. Using hands, gently stretch disk into 12-inch round, working along edges and giving disk quarter turns as you stretch. Transfer dough to well-floured peel and stretch into 13-inch round. Using back of spoon or ladle, spread 1/2 cup tomato sauce in thin layer over surface of dough, leaving 1/4-inch border around edge. Sprinkle 1/4 cup Parmesan evenly over sauce, followed by 1 cup mozzarella. Slide pizza carefully onto stone and bake until crust is well browned and cheese is bubbly and beginning to brown, 10 to 12 minutes, rotating pizza halfway through. Remove pizza and place on wire rack for 5 minutes before slicing and serving. Repeat step 5 to shape, top, and bake second pizza.


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2012, 03:27:47 PM »
You should be fine. My normal dough batch uses a pound of flour, and my KA mixer has no problem mixing it (except for the fact that the gears are currently toast).

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2012, 03:34:35 PM »
I forgot to add that I think you should mix the dough for 8 to 10 minutes. Since you're using IDY, just add all ingredients to the bowl and mix. Or mix everything except oil for about a minute, then add oil and continue mixing.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2012, 03:46:29 PM »
Also, since it says "New York style," I would divide the dough and form the pieces into dough balls immediately after mixing the dough. Then I'd store the dough balls in a bag or covered bowls or plastic wrap.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2012, 05:08:28 PM »
I don't want to get to technical and nerdy here, but  mixing a dough in a food processor and mixing the exact same dough in a KA will not yield two identical results. The procedures and the recipe were formulated for being made in a food processor. This is actually a recipe from several years back which CI published in many publications. The combo of instant yeast, cold water and processor speed produce a dough which will be different in some respects than what you would produce using the same ingredients in a KA mixer. Since you don't have a food processor you can't compare the two side by side, but if you did you would see a faster and higher rise from the processor dough than you would from the mixer dough. The difference in the final finished pizza may not be noticable, the these doughs will not be identical in the timing and volume of the rise.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2012, 07:00:01 PM »
Here's a link to a very good article from Kenji that was done over as SLICE a few years back   http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/10/the-pizza-lab-how-to-make-great-new-york-style-pizza.html?ref=search

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2012, 07:24:11 PM »
cchalmers,

Dave raises a good point about the differences between using a stand mixer instead of a food processor. In my experience, for small amounts of dough, a food processor does a better job of making the dough than my basic KitchenAid stand mixer with a C hook. However, my recollection is that Kenji neglected to mention that a food processor can impart much more heat to the dough than a stand mixer. And that heat can result is faster fermentation of the dough and a bigger rise, even the next day after being refrigerated. That is why your recipe calls for using ice cold water. That ice cold water will offset the heat imparted to the dough by the food processor.

In your case using the stand mixer, my advice is to use the formula water at a temperature that will result in a finished dough temperature of around 75-80 degrees F. If you use ice cold water, the fermentation will be retarded and your dough might not be quite ready when you are ready to use it. The delayed fermentation might push the window of usability out a day or more.

Peter


Offline cchalmers

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2012, 08:58:57 PM »
I really appreciate everyone's input.  If I were to double the recipe (I am thinking I may now have to do this anyway to have enough for everyone), I am guessing that would be a job better suited for the KA?...  If I were to double, does anyone have suggestions for the starting temp of the water and the amount of time needed in the KA?  Is there anything else I need to keep in mind when doubling a dough recipe?  I am not serving this Pizza until Friday, and I could make the dough as early as Tuesday evening...  Regarding my water temp/knead time Q's, if there is some technique I should know for figuring this out I'd love to learn, rather than just asking people to give me answers all the time  :)  Thanks!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Some guidance for New York Style America's Test Kitchen Recipe
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2012, 09:29:45 PM »
cchalmers,

The main point to keep in mind when doubling the dough batch is whether your particular model of KitchenAid stand mixer can handle about 3 1/2 pounds of dough and properly knead that amount of dough to the desired condition. Ideally, you want to knead the dough to the point where it is slightly under kneaded--not to the point where there is full gluten development. The dough doesn't have to pass the windowpane test at this stage. It is hard to specify a knead time because each situation is different.

On the matter of finished dough temperature and water temperature, you might want to read the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14376.msg143632.html#msg143632.

Peter


 

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